Definition of bloop in English:

bloop

verb

North American
informal
  • 1no object (of an electronic device) emit a short low-pitched noise.

    ‘a fruit machine blooping in the corner’
    • ‘And I'll tell you right now, that bleeping and blooping gets under your skin really fast.’
    • ‘Moments later, the two legendary white paddles appeared onscreen, blipping and blooping the single pixel ball between them.’
    • ‘You'd be at a party, and there would be a lava lamp blooping away, and a record playing (a ‘record’ was a primitive compact disc that operated by static electricity).’
    • ‘He swung his bar-code reader like some kind of ray gun, the tiny machine bleeping and blooping as it scanned bar codes printed and pasted across the counter in front of him.’
    • ‘Alongside picked acoustic guitar, occasional keyboard blooping and a drum machine, his boy-next-door growl hammers it home.’
  • 2no object Make a mistake.

    ‘the company admitted it had blooped’
    • ‘I guess we blooped together as I have some very similar shots.’
    • ‘No offense, but I believe you blooped on this movie.’
    • ‘We blooped up a couple of times before we got our final copy.’
    • ‘But this is essentially the bit where you blooped up.’
    • ‘I blooped and I'm so ashamed.’
    perpetrate, commit, be responsible for, be guilty of, be to blame for
    View synonyms
  • 3Baseball
    with object Hit (a ball) weakly or make (a hit) that lands just beyond the reach of the infielders.

    ‘he blooped a single over the fielder in the third inning’
    • ‘Whenever a hitter bloops a ball into the outfield during the day or at twilight, Wilson has a tough time picking it up.’
    • ‘He has shown great hands this spring and can bloop hits to the opposite field seemingly at will.’
    • ‘Jenkins broke up the no-hit bid with one out in the seventh when he blooped a double that barely stayed fair down the left-field line.’
    • ‘Oliver then blooped a fly ball into short center field.’
    • ‘The time and work paid off when LaRue blooped a single into short center field.’

noun

North American
informal
  • 1A short low-pitched noise emitted by an electronic device.

    ‘a few bleeps and bloops’
    • ‘Besides the original look and feel, each of the games also features the original bleeps and bloops from its heyday.’
    • ‘Of all the beeps and bloops in your home, you're still likely able to pick out your telephone.’
    • ‘Instrumental experiments with strings, bells, glitches and bloops also mesh with late-night folk, and fusion never felt so smooth.’
    • ‘Everything turns to love and good feeling good, this album's bleeps, bloops, and 70's funk sounds get all your parts moving and swaying.’
    • ‘Response is a return to the synth sounds of the '80s, toying with all the bleeps, bloops and digitally modified voices that were our soundtrack for arcades and roller rinks.’
    • ‘It's unsurprising that the modern age hasn't given rise to many more unidentified bleeps and bloops, but perhaps we've become inured to the crackle of unwanted aural static.’
    • ‘I'm banned from anywhere for life, and my computer shuts down with a bloop.’
    • ‘The final highlight is a song which contains perhaps the finest breakdown of the disc, utilizing bleeps and bloops intercut with sumptuous vocals to hypnotic effect.’
    • ‘The convoluted storyline disappears into long stretches of guitar-play, synths, bleeps and bloops.’
    • ‘The album's major flaw is that 15 tracks of repetitive bloops and beeps is simply too long.’
    • ‘One part loopy, dissonant, wrenching guitars, one part playful synth bleeps and bloops, one part punky, four on the floor drumming and shouted female vocals all generously sprinkled with raw disco energy and a refreshing sense of humour.’
    • ‘After all, what would a festival in Canada's electronic capital be without a few nights of bleeps, bloops and bumps?’
    • ‘I was raised on flashing lights and sounds effects that ranged from bloops all the way to bleeps.’
    • ‘These were songs composed almost entirely of a few beeps, a few bloops and a few whistles.’
    • ‘Today the bleeps, bloops, and blats just sound quaint.’
    • ‘‘Fun noises’ seems to be the name of the game for a certain brand of IDM, the notion that the more clicks and pops and beeps and bloops a song has the better, despite whether or not they actually belong.’
    • ‘He pulls out the original drum track, throws in a turgid approximation of the live drums with a drum machine and a stiff boom-kick, adds some bloops, bleeps, and squiggles (because, hey, it's a remix), and cashes his paycheck.’
    • ‘Rumours of him communicating in bleeps, bloops and squelches are greatly exaggerated.’
    • ‘The aggressive bleeps and bloops and the potent rhymes create cool juxtaposition, with past glories and modern technology not simply clashing but lending each other some legitimacy as well.’
    • ‘The usual Gomez sound, a psychedelic blend of blues-rock and electronic bleeps and bloops was unique enough to satisfy multiple listenings on previous albums.’
  • 2A mistake.

    ‘a typical beginner's bloop’
    • ‘He's rid the White House of all the people who are likely to leak his bloops to the world.’
    • ‘Although I never use it to make projects it has been great fixing up my bloops.’
    • ‘Maybe they want to see if I can make all the little bloops and dollops around my edges look even.’
    • ‘So, it's my responsibility to show myself unretouched, to come out on my talk show with my face washed, to show my cellulite, to show my bloops -- you know, my back fat on my bra.’
    • ‘In the midst of editing my website I think I made a bloop and can't fix it.’
    mistake, error, blunder, fault, gaffe, slip, slip of the pen
    View synonyms
  • 3Baseball

    ‘seven hits which were bloops for the most part’
    another term for blooper (sense 2)
    as modifier ‘a bloop single’
    • ‘He allowed only one homer but can be victimized by bloops and broken-bat hits.’
    • ‘In theory, pulling in the fences would cut down on the area that outfielders have to cover, thereby reducing the number of bloop hits that fall in.’
    • ‘You know a pitcher's stuff is shaky when in just six pitches he has given up two singles and a bloop double on a 3-0 count.’
    • ‘He was a bloop hitter to right field, but he got around on a high fastball, and it jumped out of the ballpark.’
    • ‘A bloop single, with two outs in the ninth inning, had determined the outcome.’

Origin

1920s: imitative.

Pronunciation

bloop

/bluːp/