Main definitions of bloomer in English

: bloomer1bloomer2bloomer3

bloomer1

noun

  • 1[usually in combination] A plant that produces flowers at a specified time:

    ‘fragrant night-bloomers such as nicotiana’
    • ‘But if you see a new scape rising at the base of a blooming plant, the plant is a repeat bloomer.’
    • ‘The following list is by no means exhaustive, but will give you ideas for some early bloomers that are good bets for producing flowers in late winter and early spring.’
    • ‘A few will describe certain plants as continuous bloomers, but even these usually have a period of peak bloom.’
    • ‘Lightly prune midseason bloomers in late winter or early spring.’
    • ‘Or you can stagger the bloom time by planting mid- and late-season bloomers together, creating a spring display that blooms in succession, for a whole season of color!’
    • ‘To encourage growth and additional flushes of flowers, feed repeat bloomers with a complete fertilizer.’
    • ‘They are found throughout the Northern Hemisphere from the Arctic to the Tropics and, as a group, tend to be early bloomers that put out masses of flowers that turn into masses of hips (good bird food).’
    • ‘From now through mid-March, deciduous trees show off their elegant forms, primroses are in flower, and winter bloomers such as witch hazel and sarcococca are perfuming the air.’
    • ‘Rather than planting everything that blooms at the same time in close proximity, distribute the groups of early-, mid-, and late-season bloomers around the garden.’
    • ‘The flat, strappy foliage of the exotic night bloomer contrasts texturally with a bed companion, the enormous, finely cut fronds of an Australian tree fern.’
    • ‘Evening bloomers, daylily cultivars that flower in the evening and remain open until the following day, also are available.’
    • ‘When blossoms of early bloomers wither, she removes them by hand, leaving areas of green leaves between the remaining areas of color.’
    • ‘The white bird may flower anytime but tends to be more of a winter bloomer.’
    • ‘This early summer bloomer native to Tibet is like no other.’
    • ‘Purchase this type of shrub rose, and you'll have a recurrent bloomer that will flower profusely several times a year.’
    • ‘An old classic June bloomer in cooler areas, ‘Lord of June’ tall bearded iris, may open in April or May in the South.’
    • ‘Prune spring bloomers in early summer, right after they finish flowering.’
    • ‘An early season bloomer, about 18-inches tall, its subtle fragrance has been described as elegant, sweet, and tartly fruity.’
    • ‘Most of the small Dahlias are early and profuse bloomers, starting to flower in July and continuing right through till frost.’
    • ‘This repeat bloomer also can be trained into intricate shapes.’
    1. 1.1[with adjective] A person who matures or flourishes at a specified time:
      ‘he was a late bloomer’
      • ‘Rivas considers herself a late bloomer in the art form, though.’
      • ‘At 30, he is a rarity - a late bloomer who only began to make his mark at an age when most of his contemporaries have had enough of chalk dust and limb stretching.’
      • ‘So, if your daughter is a ‘late bloomer,’ it doesn't necessarily mean there's something wrong with her.’
      • ‘Sure, I was a late bloomer compared to all those other people who were born with a tennis racket in hand.’
      • ‘I came to many things late in life, and am something of a late bloomer, if you will.’
      • ‘Indeed, Moliere was such a late bloomer as a writer that we don't even know what questions to ask.’
      • ‘I was your classic 90-pound weakling and, worse, a late bloomer.’
      • ‘So if you're a late bloomer, it's not too late, it may take you longer to accomplish some goals if you wait too long into your final semester, but the resources at your school are there for you when you're ready, not the other way around.’
      • ‘I'd prefer to think of Maggie as a late bloomer, one of those bored, too-bright-for-their-own-good students so advanced that their minds wander to loftier thoughts.’
      • ‘By modern, cult-of-youth standards, Burgess was a late bloomer as a writer, not getting published until he was 35.’
      • ‘What can I say; I'm a late bloomer in many things.’
      • ‘My mom said I was a late bloomer because I didn't start actually ‘liking’ boys till I was in 7th grade.’
      • ‘As a brother who considers himself a late bloomer, I did not achieve my bachelor's degree until I was 32 in January 1995.’
      • ‘I was, obviously, a late bloomer, and I thought I would never change.’
      • ‘‘I'm a late bloomer, that's for sure,’ he says with a laugh.’
      • ‘Lives do not always proceed in predictable patterns, and we may have a choice between a classic late bloomer who has just reached his powers, and a morning glory, who hit his peak early and has not matched it since.’
      • ‘As for you being a late bloomer, it's more significant that you've accomplished the first step toward a potentially rewarding career - once you figure out what it is.’
      • ‘A late bloomer, the diminutive Pompey took up track for the first time after her family migrated to the US in 1992, following in the footsteps of her younger sister Allison.’
      • ‘See, I was not just a late bloomer, I was a very late bloomer.’
      • ‘The 23-year-old has been on the circuit for nearly a decade but was a late bloomer.’

Pronunciation:

bloomer

/ˈbluːmə/

Main definitions of bloomer in English

: bloomer1bloomer2bloomer3

bloomer2

noun

British
informal, dated
  • A serious or stupid mistake:

    ‘he never committed a bloomer’
    • ‘Recently our bickering politicians committed a bloomer.’
    • ‘To doubt this fact is to commit a bloomer.’
    • ‘But the government has its pride; it is yet to admit that it had committed a bloomer which needs to be rectified posthaste.’
    • ‘About 45 minutes later, he committed his bloomer, and there is no doubt in my mind that the champion jockey made the elementary mistake of thinking that he had the race won aboard the second - favourite.’
    • ‘He has made some bloomers in his time, from the failed bid for American General to his company's attempts to ratchet up his pay just as policyholders' bonuses were going in the other direction.’
    error, mistake, miscalculation, fallacy, slip, oversight, fault, blunder, gaffe, defect, flaw
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 19th century: equivalent to blooming error.

Pronunciation:

bloomer

/ˈbluːmə/

Main definitions of bloomer in English

: bloomer1bloomer2bloomer3

bloomer3

noun

British
  • A large loaf with diagonal slashes on a rounded top.

    • ‘These include Cottage Loaves, Rye bread, Multi-seed, the classic Bloomer as well as finger rolls, torpedoes and much more.’
    • ‘More crumb less crust, we use artisan baguette dough, baked as a pointy bloomer, and top with poppy seeds.’
    • ‘I had visions of running over to the fresh bread counter, ripping the crust off a large bloomer and burying my face in the soft, warm expanse of white loaf.’

Origin

1930s: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

bloomer

/ˈbluːmə/