Definition of blithely in English:

blithely

adverb

  • 1In a way that shows a casual and cheerful indifference considered to be callous or improper.

    ‘her arrest order was blithely ignored by the police chief’
    • ‘Like just about everyone else in the film, she is hedonistic and blithely self-involved.’
    • ‘Having blithely assumed they were all automatons, she is upset to see a bloody corpse inside.’
    • ‘He puts blinders on and sees nothing but the flaws, while blithely overlooking the soul of the message, and the innocence of the delivery.’
    • ‘He fails to grasp the structural teleology of a composition, blithely ignoring any real legato.’
    • ‘His family is blithely unaware of his nature.’
    • ‘Indeed, the fiction of an Australia blithely indifferent to America is the single-most unrealistic aspect of the film.’
    • ‘Throughout his reign, he blithely ruled as he thought right and did little to explain himself.’
    • ‘Most animals blithely ignore the dead bodies of other members of their pack or herd.’
    • ‘There is hardly a trace of social realism in this concerto, which seems blithely unconcerned about the world around it.’
    • ‘The Times columnist was blithely condescending to the songwriting team's canon.’
    1. 1.1literary In a happy or carefree manner.
      ‘the prince was wandering blithely out into the courtyard’
      • ‘The cook is as blithely eccentric as a good neighbor.’
      • ‘The family's younger son blithely tools around rural Shropshire in his natty two-seater.’
      • ‘These white wines, from here and abroad, sail blithely across your taste buds, wake them up, and then gracefully depart.’
      • ‘If he guards his food bowl, blithely walk by his bowl and drop in some terrific treats.’
      • ‘They were padding along, toasty as English muffins, as blithely as if they were at home in their bedroom slippers.’

Pronunciation

blithely

/ˈblʌɪðli/