Main definitions of blaze in English

: blaze1blaze2blaze3

blaze1

noun

  • 1A very large or fiercely burning fire:

    ‘twenty firemen fought the blaze’
    • ‘In July and early August, firefighting crews have battled blazes in nearly every Western state.’
    • ‘The smoke began to pour out of it as the sudden blaze died down.’
    • ‘As the threat began to diminish, authorities also began to make plans to send home some of thousands of firefighters battling blazes scattered from San Diego County to Los Angeles suburbs.’
    • ‘Hundreds of firefighters yesterday battled about 70 blazes across New South Wales, as strong winds and unusually warm spring weather fed the flames.’
    • ‘Nineteen firefighters from both district and city fire departments fought the blaze with six trucks and high pressure hoses.’
    • ‘Police suspect arsonists lit about half the blazes and six people have been arrested.’
    • ‘In the middle of that rooftop blaze, the scene turned into slow motion for him.’
    • ‘There's already six aircraft that have been battling this blaze for the last few hours.’
    • ‘Three fire engines attended the blaze, described by firemen as ‘very serious’, just before midday.’
    • ‘A rookie firefighter who was on his first day's duty with Keighley's Blue Watch has been praised for his actions when he was called to an horrific death blaze.’
    • ‘Despite the warnings, fires have begun raging again in the center of Suva and the fire department has called back all firefighters on leave to help battle the blazes.’
    • ‘The biggest trouble is in the northern part of the state, this blaze about 150 miles north of San Francisco.’
    • ‘A boy seriously burned in a fire that killed his older brother eight years ago has saved his younger brother and sister from another blaze at their Bradford home.’
    • ‘Authorities are anxious to douse this blaze and begin dealing with its aftermath.’
    • ‘The 7,500-acre blaze is only half contained and may pick up as the day gets warmer.’
    • ‘Supposedly this ultra-intense blaze was caused by a man with a cigarette lighter and a ‘carton of flammable liquid’.’
    • ‘Authorities say this blaze ignited after construction workers hit a gas line.’
    • ‘Paul last found himself in America three years ago, when he was part of an 11,000-man team put together to tackle a major forest blaze.’
    • ‘Three perished in house blazes and one was killed when two vehicles crashed and burst into flames.’
    • ‘In August of that year, there were 10,000 firefighters and operations people battling blazes in Region One alone.’
    fire, flames, conflagration, inferno, holocaust, firestorm
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[in singular] A very bright display of light or colour:
      ‘the gardens in summer are a blaze of colour’
      • ‘It is breathtaking, and brings the city into a blaze of colour on a cold winter's night.’
      • ‘As my eyes adjusted, to the new world around me, everything was a glare then a blaze of ambers.’
      • ‘The fun will culminate once again in a blaze of colour with an Atlantis carnival parade through the town centre from 10.30 am on Saturday.’
      • ‘I recently visited Doncaster and their floral displays were a blaze of colour.’
      • ‘Prime times to visit the county are without doubt during the Spring, when the blossoming apple orchards are a blaze of colour, or in the Autumn, during the harvest.’
      • ‘In the spring the rhododendrons and azaleas offer a blaze of colour.’
      • ‘The girls arrived into school in a blaze of colour wearing football, hurling, soccer and rugby jerseys and helped to raise a terrific 500.’
      • ‘His wings were the vivid colors of fire, his head-feathers an equally bright blaze of mingled orange and red.’
      • ‘The bulbs were sponsored by local business people and everyone is looking forward to Spring when the road sides should be a blaze of colour.’
      • ‘Hanging baskets, flower tubs and borders are now a blaze of colour.’
      • ‘During the warm and shining spring flower blossoming season, you can enjoy a blaze of colour here, with lovely flowers everywhere.’
      • ‘Blackpool will erupt in a blaze of colour tonight when the town's world-famous Illuminations blossom into life.’
      • ‘Grass, ivy, and nearly 150 trees connect and soften the campus' blaze of white and concrete.’
      • ‘Hector shut his eyes, to see his inner world, a blaze of swirling pearly colours.’
      • ‘Central London became a blaze of colour as thousands of people from all walks of life joined a massive parade in a spectacular finale to the Jubilee celebrations.’
      • ‘But there's an irony and self-awareness at work in some of these books, hiding inside a blaze of pink.’
      • ‘At the moment the course is a blaze of colour and it is a privilege to tread the lush fairways and lightning fast greens.’
      • ‘All these combined with seasonal foliage and exotic flowers enable superb arrangements to be created, which filled the stage with a blaze of colour.’
      • ‘The lonely front door comes alive in a red and yellow blaze, the reflection of a gas station sign.’
      • ‘The sun setting in the far north west went down in a blaze of red and blended so gently into a moonlit night that it seemed as if it hadn't set at all.’
      glare, gleam, flash, burst, flare, dazzle, streak, radiance, brilliance, beam, glitter
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2[in singular] A conspicuous display or outburst of something:
      ‘White ended the season in a blaze of glory, with seven goals in as many games’
      ‘their relationship broke up in a blaze of publicity’
      • ‘An urgent week-long White House effort to stop the blaze of anger has had some success.’
      • ‘This is where my last vestiges of immaturity come out in final blaze of glory.’
      • ‘Long and bitter patent actions brought against him by the Wright brothers have only provided tinder for this blaze of confusion.’
      • ‘Lin had scarcely been released in a blaze of unfavorable publicity when the Immigration Department was at it again.’
      • ‘In each case, however, the concern was expressed with care and knowledge, rather than being sublimated in a blaze of polemic.’
      • ‘The festival was launched in a blaze of music, singing and dancing in Riverstown on Friday night last, August 2.’
      • ‘Debates help them break through the blaze of hyperbolic attacks and confusing countercharges.’
      • ‘He burst onto the scene in a blaze of very quick and intimidatory bowling.’
      • ‘Sumner's eight phone extensions lit up as a blaze of incoming phone calls fought their way to his attention all with orders for him to execute.’
      • ‘It was a three-day-long blaze of celebration and enjoyment.’
      • ‘This is a classic lightning blaze of good-times rock 'n' roll.’
      • ‘What we have, then, is a career that appeared to become arrested in mid-flow, which subsequently recovered in a blaze of congratulation.’
      • ‘Since the currency was launched in a blaze of euphoria it has failed dismally to realise the potential which its supporters claimed it offered.’
      • ‘The poky Austrian farm building is filled with a blaze of noise, colour and light.’
      • ‘One must prolong the periods between productivity so that each complete Work can be released upon the unsuspecting public in a blaze of sycophantic publicity.’
      • ‘But - and here's the surprising bit - it failed to provoke me into a blaze of mouth-frothing, righteous anger.’
      • ‘I was too much at risk from the smoulder of his irritability, sudden blazes of rage, to see his deep disappointment with life.’
      • ‘She screamed, and went into a fanatical frenzy, pushing aside her weariness for one last blaze of glory.’
      • ‘There was less enthusiasm from her school, where this sudden blaze of publicity was seen as no more than an embarrassment.’
      • ‘With the release of the new movie The Lord of the Rings, there'll be a blaze of T-shirts, caps, all the usual commercial hoo-ha.’
      outburst, burst, eruption, flare-up, explosion, outbreak, blow-up
      View synonyms
  • 2blazesinformal Used in various expressions of anger, bewilderment, or surprise as a euphemism for ‘hell’:

    ‘‘Go to blazes!’ he shouted’
    ‘what the blazes are you all talking about?’
    • ‘And, because there was something slightly supercilious in his voice, I almost told him to go to blazes, and then I thought, hold on: he's right.’
    • ‘How in blue blazes am I to know where this program gets its data from?’
    • ‘How in blue blazes did that kid manage to tame the untamable?’
    • ‘The only problem is, how in blue blazes do I wait so long for the movie to be showing somewhere near me?’
    • ‘What the blue blazes is throat-singing?’
    • ‘How in blue blazes were you supposed to know you'd end up on the wrong side of a Mafia don?’
    • ‘In fact, it hurt like the bloody blue blazes, which was not a great surprise, considering that I thought I was dying.’
    outburst, burst, eruption, flare-up, explosion, outbreak, blow-up
    View synonyms

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Burn fiercely or brightly:

    ‘the fire blazed merrily’
    • ‘She was almost off her feet as she was watching the rocket rising into the sky with orange flames blazing.’
    • ‘Two flatbed military trucks were abandoned with their cabs blazing fiercely as dozens of townspeople converged to loot tires and other vehicle parts.’
    • ‘Also notable are the fire barrels that blaze brightly during the nocturnal hours.’
    • ‘The wagon began to blaze merrily in the morning light, and the driver barely escaped the inferno in time.’
    • ‘Stuffed into the neck of the bottle was a flame engulfed rag, blazing brightly.’
    • ‘A fire blazing brightly in the fireplace meant warmth and comfort but at a deeper level also meant survival and the perpetuation of life itself.’
    • ‘I got back this morning from a weekend away and the gas hob is still blazing away merrily to itself.’
    • ‘Fire still blazed fiercely in front of the small family, preventing any form of escape.’
    • ‘And once the fire was blazing away merrily, Sudarshan turned to his next course of action - clean away the cobwebs.’
    • ‘A wood burner will blaze merrily away through the coldest of the hours.’
    • ‘He said the fires had been blazing for so long that some of them had actually burned themselves out for lack of oxygen.’
    • ‘All around the room, brilliant flames leapt up, hot and cold by turns, blazing brightly in six niches set into the walls.’
    • ‘Soon he had a fire blazing away merrily and Krystal came over to stand next to him.’
    • ‘It's Sunday morning and after burning for three nights our straw-stack fire has stopped blazing.’
    • ‘About 5.00 am mark the Paschal Fire will be set alight and it will be blazing brightly in the sky as people file up for the 6.00 am Mass.’
    • ‘One by one the ten rings blazed brightly with orange and red flame, but Lauren still would not talk.’
    • ‘A fireplace set in one wall blazed fiercely, keeping the room and the food set on an iron grid before it, warm.’
    • ‘One more directed push and a fire was blazing merrily, filling the wet dark cave with flickering orange light.’
    • ‘The bright flame blazed in the open night, and over it roasted a skewered boar.’
    • ‘Enemy planes make daylight and night attacks on port, scoring a direct hit on supply ship which blazes fiercely till next morning when it is sunk.’
    burn, be ablaze, be alight, be on fire, be in flames, flame, be aflame, flare up
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1blaze up Burst into flame:
      ‘he attacked the fire with poker and tongs until it blazed up’
      • ‘Flames immediately blazed up and filled the den with warmth.’
      • ‘I turned and saw his outline, arms akimbo, with the fire blazing up behind him.’
      • ‘The inferno that now blazed up showed the whole camp what was happening.’
      • ‘The wall, the windows, and everything in the room, except the floors, blazed up.’
      • ‘The fire was brought under control only to blaze up again on Wednesday.’
      • ‘The fire blazed up, crackling, in the pit, and the torches shed their dancing light from their iron holders on the walls.’
      • ‘When a steady flame blazed up in the kerosene lantern James had been carrying, Pilate's strong hand shoved Ivan into the cool darkness.’
      • ‘Fire blazed up in fury and the girl ran outside and watched the house she once lived in go up in flames.’
      • ‘The firewood, soaked in oil, blazed up immediately, and his boat became a beacon of flame, drifting downstream towards Lake Tallian.’
      • ‘The horse trotted toward her, the fire blazed up, and Jill fainted.’
    2. 1.2 Shine brightly or powerfully:
      ‘the sun blazed down’
      figurative ‘Barbara's eyes were blazing with anger’
      • ‘The city of Tokyo was blazing with high flashing lights of red, blue, white, and yellow.’
      • ‘He turned to Ryan again, his eyes now blazing with anger.’
      • ‘She rolled her head to him, her neck blazing with instant pain.’
      • ‘In front of him, however, the screen was blazing with color, and the same boy was on the television, pushing his way through a dense forest.’
      • ‘The sun blazed down and my sunscreen dealer was calling me again.’
      • ‘Every day the hot sun blazed down upon the little village, and never not once in many months did a drop of rain fall.’
      • ‘This summer, the big screens are blazing with that favourite goose of the unimaginative exec: the comic-book adaptation.’
      • ‘Take a look: the hibiscus at the letterbox doesn't seem to think it's Winter, otherwise she wouldn't be blazing like a flame the size of a dinner plate.’
      • ‘Yesterday, the sun that has faded the Union Jack hanging from the church tower blazed down, and veterans who once had to fight their way in were welcomed as honoured friends.’
      • ‘There was a brilliant pattern of purples and oranges blazing across the sky, with a few small clouds blazing with the sun's reflection.’
      • ‘Suddenly, a light blazes forth from the center of the symbol on the table, shaped like an eye.’
      • ‘Telepathic communication was something that she had never thought to use and already her mind was blazing with the new avenues that it opened up.’
      • ‘Although it threatens to flicker out in spots, Pawn Shoppe Heart mostly blazes with an intensity that avoids sounding contrived or dated.’
      • ‘The central region of the small galaxy NGC 1705 blazes with the light of thousands of young and old stars.’
      • ‘Blinding white light shone into the room, silhouetting a tall figure standing in the doorway, hands blazing with power.’
      • ‘Outside, the sun blazed down from a shimmering sky, as it had for most of the day.’
      • ‘His blades, still blazing with a powerful energy, cut through Strife's scorching aura without the slightest resistance.’
      • ‘The Marine's eyes blazed fiercely, her lips set in a grim line as her hair drifted, hiding the bandages on her face.’
      • ‘Brand new floodlights blazed down on Parkside, but it was lights out for them as Workington Town gave them a lesson in teamwork and finishing.’
      • ‘Globes of light blazed up and down its length, and the white rectangles painted on asphalt glowed unearthly.’
      shine, beam, flash, flare, glare, gleam, glint, dazzle, glitter, glisten, be radiant, burn brightly
      View synonyms
  • 2Fire a gun repeatedly or indiscriminately:

    ‘they stormed with main entrance with guns blazing’
    • ‘Let me explain to the PM why he needs to take crash courses in combat and go out there in the field with guns blazing.’
    • ‘Repression has led to the emergence of a ‘suicide family’ in our midst, complete with women taking to the streets with guns blazing.’
    • ‘In some scenes Bond brazens it out, fists flailing or guns blazing, to pick off the enemy, but most of the time greater cunning is needed.’
    • ‘There are scenes that you've written of the captain ordering all the guns blazing from the ship up the river, out into the bushland.’
    • ‘Most likely we will see a lot of guns blazing, ridiculously incredible jumping stunts and other Hollywood's Best Stuntmen TV show fodder.’
    • ‘Because lasting solutions to longstanding conflicts demand dialogue and compromise - very hard to do with guns blazing in one's face.’
    • ‘They're always prepared to go in guns blazing but the job is best done if a shot is never fired.’
    • ‘Since you're on a timer to go from the insertion point to the extraction point, you have to run around with guns blazing.’
    • ‘Certainly no maverick hero is allowed to dash in just in time with guns blazing.’
    • ‘Then, in another few seconds, he was joined by the two agents that had come with the Lieutenant Governor, and they blazed away with their riot guns in the same direction.’
    • ‘The gunmen stormed the main entrance with guns blazing, and took several hundred shocked staff, visitors and patients hostage.’
    • ‘The 12 single-player missions require careful tactics: charge straight at the enemy, all guns blazing, and you will soon be dead.’
    • ‘A tank, guns blazing, fills the downtown of Jenin with a diesel smokescreen to enforce a curfew order.’
    • ‘They don't coordinate, they haven't blown the bridges, they just blaze away.’
    • ‘We're never less than, oh, perhaps 400 yards back from the first vehicle as it's blazing away with its guns.’
    • ‘If, on the other hand, you want to charge through, guns blazing, you will be punished by the game's insane scarcity of ammunition.’
    • ‘Scores of men and women, masked and wearing bomb belts, burst out of the vehicles, hijacked in neighbouring Ingushetia, and into the playground with guns blazing.’
    • ‘Even if Wayne's friend's wife had been able to come out of the room guns blazing, her husband would still in all likelihood have been shot.’
    • ‘Occasionally, on the outskirts of the isolated impact area, you could hear tanks firing machine guns and blazing their cannons.’
  • 3informal Achieve something in an impressive manner:

    ‘she blazed to a gold medal in the 200-metre sprint’
    • ‘Now blazing up the airwaves, the girls are preparing themselves for the deal that will take them through to the big time.’
    • ‘Truck owners may dig shots of pickups blazing up mountains, but they also want to know about things like horsepower and torque.’
    • ‘You should be able to check this game out rather cheap, it's not new and I don't think it blazed up the charts.’
    • ‘As a receiver, Berrian can leap over defenders to pull down a ball or he can blaze past them for a gamebreaking score with his incredible speed.’
    • ‘The blast of the starting gun seemed to still echo through the Alaskan countryside when the Navy team came blazing up to the first checkpoint.’
    1. 3.1[with object] Hit (a ball) with impressive strength:
      ‘he blazed a drive into the rough’
      • ‘He seemed a little surprised that the ball managed to find its way through and snatched at the chance as he blazed the ball over from eight yards.’
      • ‘The ball fell to Nakata who blazed the ball high into the night sky.’
      • ‘Pierce Power had a good chance on 10 minutes when he met a cross from Ian Ryan but he blazed the ball across the area with the goal at his mercy.’
      • ‘York had chances, the best coming with two minutes to go when Roz Ramli blazed the ball across the circle and Couttie calmly flicked it into the top corner of the net.’
      • ‘But a nightmarish shot at the 15th, where he blazed the ball into a water hazard, put the brakes on his charge and he stumbled home for nine-under.’
      • ‘He gathered a ball on the right of the goal, jinked inside two tackles and even though he was half-tripped he regained his feet to blaze the ball to the corner of the net.’
      • ‘Alas the old problems returned as the ball was blazed a yard over.’
      • ‘The former England skipper evoked memories of less happy days with the national side when he blazed an injury time spot-kick over the bar and at the same time passed up on the opportunity to end his career on 100 goals.’
      • ‘PJ was unlucky to miss a goal when he blazed the ball over the crossbar.’
      • ‘Less than 30 seconds later, Pires picks the ball up in the centre of the pitch, edges left to right slightly, leaves two Roma defenders sprawling on the floor, and blazes the ball over the bar.’
      • ‘He looked up, thought about it for a moment and then blazed the ball into the far corner beyond the despairing fingers of O'Malley.’
      • ‘Knight headed on to Cormack, who found himself free at the far post again, but he blazed the ball across goal from eight yards.’
      • ‘He beat two further defenders to work his way into the penalty area and just as everyone thought he was going to end his barren run in front of goal, he snatched at the opportunity and blazed the ball high and wide.’
      • ‘She collected a high centre from Caroline McGing, despite her two shadows, and blazed the ball to the roof of the net.’
      • ‘On the turnover, it was Tallow who made the impressive start as Colm Geary raced in only to blaze the ball over the bar with the goal at his mercy.’
      • ‘He straightens up into his delivery and blazes it into your glove so hard, dust rises, curling up like smoke.’
      • ‘Prior's job was simply to show promise, blaze one fastball, maybe win one game.’
      • ‘Justice was served as the spot kick was blazed over the bar.’
      • ‘The former Celtic striker picked himself up, dusted himself down, took a deep breath and blazed his spot-kick over the bar.’
      • ‘Very rarely do you see him blaze a chance high or wide.’
  • 4informal Smoke cannabis.

    • ‘I don't think they bargained for Twink hissing at Paddy O'Gorman or the post-Celebrity Farm hoo-ha about Kevin Sharkey blazing up a doobie in the loo as an example of Irish culture that should be shared with the wider world.’
    • ‘All of a sudden, it was OK to blaze chronic all day while being unemployed.’
    • ‘Leave the stoners alone to blaze some harmless weed and start doing something about real drugs!’
    • ‘When I blaze up a doobie, all that happens is I get extremely hungry and mostly sit around giggling at pretty much everything!’
    • ‘We are a nation of quiet stoners, blazing up and smoking out in peace and harmony.’

Phrases

  • like blazes

    • informal Very fast or forcefully:

      ‘I ran like blazes homewards’
      • ‘Cecil collapsed on a bed staring up at the ceiling; his entire body ached and his chest and arm still hurt like blazes.’
      • ‘A child plucks out a photo, then runs like blazes to it, tags it and returns.’
      • ‘They perform mundane services in much of the world, and make a ton of money in the process - and they are growing like blazes.’
      • ‘It hurts like blazes, and the whole hand swells up like a Porky Pig cartoon.’
      • ‘We would soon let him know what we thought, and argue like blazes about it.’
      • ‘It works like blazes, 'cause the energy in both songs is, amazingly, equivalent.’
      • ‘The fact that the car does not need to be revved like blazes to give it some ‘get up and go’ is an undoubted advantage in this area.’
  • with all guns blazing

    • informal With great but reckless determination and energy:

      ‘they went for him with all guns blazing’
      • ‘If Jackson's camp, operating from a hotel in Las Vegas, has come out with guns blazing, the prosecution remains convinced it has a firm case.’
      • ‘I'm sure they've taken that on board and they'll come out with all guns blazing.’
      • ‘With a very lackluster record of past accomplishment, Lam roared into town with guns blazing.’
      • ‘It's time we go to war against decrepitude with guns blazing.’
      • ‘‘The Stones were looking forward to opening in the UK - for their hometown audience - with all guns blazing,’ said Michael Cohl.’
      • ‘Brazil came out with all guns blazing and, as Scotland wilted in 90-degree heat, the fab four overran the dark-blue shirts with a masterful display of control, flair and power.’
      • ‘With everything I've done I've had to be guns blazing.’
      • ‘Whilst it is widely acknowledged that musicals need to be scrapped per se, I have been advised (appropriately, I believe) not to launch myself onto such a minefield with all guns blazing.’
      • ‘Again working with their long time friend and producer, the band embarked upon the recording of their album with all guns blazing, spending only a couple of weeks laying down the tracks.’
      • ‘His ‘better to be right and lose than wrong and win’ philosophy is the watchword of a man determined that if he is to go down, then he'll do so with all guns blazing.’
      • ‘But once they pick their target, they are likely to go in with guns blazing - and to expect their allies to give full approval.’
      • ‘We are not going to go in all guns blazing and say, take it or leave it.’
      • ‘Both teams will be fired up, and we expect Limerick to go into the game the same way they did against Cork - with all guns blazing.’
      • ‘I keep going at it with guns blazing, but I do wonder if my mock-buffoonery is just a cover to deflect accusations of real buffoonery.’
      • ‘Then it was the drum ‘n’ bass crew's turn, with their champion Packer coming out guns blazing.’
      • ‘In his current incarnation, Henman is determined to go down with all guns blazing.’
      • ‘There is consensus that it is preferable for one to go down with his guns blazing.’
      • ‘Brian will now have a high profile say in the council chamber while Oxford graduate Andy will be one of the national decision makers on crime and will be able to go in to Parliament all guns blazing for Leigh.’
      • ‘Well, the problem is they have gone in in some cases with guns blazing.’
      • ‘The first thing to remember is that most men are not used to women flirting with them and if you go in all guns blazing, they will run away like a sprinter at the Olympics.’

Origin

Old English blæse ‘torch, bright fire’, of Germanic origin; related ultimately to blaze.

Pronunciation:

blaze

/bleɪz/

Main definitions of blaze in English

: blaze1blaze2blaze3

blaze2

noun

  • 1A white spot or stripe on the face of a mammal or bird.

    • ‘I got quick looks at a yellowish honeyeater with a white blaze behind its face.’
    • ‘A white blaze adorns his muzzle and forehead, and it is highly desirable that the dog has white feet.’
    • ‘Many beagles have a white blaze on the face, but a solid tan face is common, too.’
    • ‘The white blaze had always been there, from the tip of her nose between her ears and down her back.’
    • ‘Blenheims are chestnut and white, with chestnut ears and a white blaze between the eyes and ears.’
    • ‘Flocki was a dark-brindle dog with a white chest, front legs and muzzle and a white stripe, known as a blaze, down the center of his face.’
    • ‘His wide, crooked blaze was unique, giving him a goofy, yet strangely appealing look.’
    1. 1.1 A broad white stripe running the length of a horse's face.
      • ‘He was a palomino with a golden coat, a white blaze, four white stockings, and a cream mane and tail.’
      • ‘Abby was lying down, softly nuzzling a brown filly with soft fur, a blaze like Abby's and a blanket on her rump.’
      • ‘The stallion was brought to the tent, a handsome bay with a white blaze and muscular loins.’
      • ‘She's a beauty too, all red with a black mane and tail and a white blaze.’
      • ‘As Johnson had said, there was another mage riding a black stallion with a white blaze on his nose.’
      • ‘He's absolutely beautiful: rich chocolate brown fur, a black mane and tail, plus a long white blaze on his nose.’
      • ‘She was totally black except for a white blaze and one white sock.’
  • 2A mark made on a tree by cutting the bark so as to mark a route.

    • ‘White, rectangular paint blazes mark the Appalachian Trail from Maine to Georgia.’
    • ‘He marked it with his blaze and registered it in his database.’
    • ‘The main difference is that the inscriptions on blazes in pine trees in Scandinavia have a longer duration than the inscriptions on the bark of deciduous trees by the Basque herders.’
    • ‘On a small section of the trail, which was not logged during the nineteenth century, eighty-five living trees and fifty-eight dead trees with blazes dating from 1644 to 1880 have been identified.’
    • ‘At this site, a line of single blue paint blazes showed the perimeters of the sale area.’

verb

  • 1Set an example by being the first to do something; pioneer:

    ‘small firms would set the pace, blazing a trail for others to follow’
    • ‘Britzolakis does not actually blaze a trail here but proceeds down a path cut by numerous critics before her.’
    • ‘Two Yorkshire cities were yesterday praised for spearheading the region's economic revival and blazing a trail for town planners across the country.’
    • ‘Furthermore, Johannesson seems to have blazed a trail for a string of other Icelandic raiders who are developing a taste for British companies.’
    • ‘Both he and Woods, who played in the same 1995 Walker Cup side, are blazing a trail for ethnic minorities on the US Tour, which is still dominated by golfers of a Waspish background.’
    • ‘The online book and music website, which blazed a trail in making consumers comfortable with the idea of buying goods over the internet, was for years dismissed by analysts as being incapable of generating profits.’
    • ‘These pioneers have blazed a trail for all who will follow.’
    • ‘These agents have blazed a trail in small savings, providing an example of enthusiasm to their counterparts elsewhere.’
    • ‘Town and district councillor Chris March said: ‘Warminster was ahead of the game when we introduced CCTV cameras and I believe the police are blazing a trail in community support once again.’’
    • ‘Since the early nineteenth century emigrants have been blazing a trail from the West-Mayo island to the Ohio city.’
    • ‘Her big breakthrough came in 1952, with one work, Mountains and Sea, which took the lessons of Pollock and blazed a trail for such colourfield painters as Kenneth Noland and Morris Louis.’
    • ‘Spearheaded by Bono, Jubilee 2000 is blazing a trail in attempting to offer debt relief to the crippled economies of Africa.’
    • ‘They are drawn by ideals of blazing a trail in China's fledgling biotech sector; the company's salaries and benefits can't compare with those in foreign ventures.’
    • ‘Our perseverance and pioneering spirit in blazing a trail nobody has ever trodden before is no doubt admirable.’
    • ‘Today, the onetime railroad lobbyist is blazing a trail to the solar system with a low-cost plan to launch manned expeditions to the moon and Mars.’
    • ‘It blazed a trail of such examples of suffering and sacrifice for public causes and this considerably helped accelerate the pace of the Indian nationalist struggle.’
    • ‘He visited most of the capitals of the continental countries and blazed a trail that was marked by some wild adventures.’
    • ‘Target has blazed a trail nationally in developing the role of Special Constables.’
    • ‘In a sense, Watkins's images blaze a trail for the tourist at the expense of the adventurer and hollow out the sublime, leaving only spectacle.’
    • ‘Let us show ingenuity, lateral thinking, and a dedication to the best outcome for all New Zealanders, because our forebears blazed a trail for us in creating a forum for the free exchange of ideas.’
    • ‘It brought art into everyday life from architecture to furniture design, blazing a trail in painting, glassware, graphic design, jewellery, pottery, metalwork, textiles and sculpture.’
  • 2Mark out a path or route:

    ‘tourists haven't blazed a trail to the top of this hill’
    • ‘It was all we could do to keep up on our laden-down mountain bikes as he blazed a trail and made pleasant conversation in return for which we replied with strained grunts and squeaks.’
    • ‘Nor is it about breaking new ground: No routes have been established since 1996, when a Russian team blazed a trail up the northern side of the Northeast Ridge.’
    • ‘A hare is be given a short head start to blaze a trail, marking his devious way with shreds of paper, soon to be pursued by a shouting pack of harriers.’
    • ‘In this game, a runner or group of runners blazed a trail and marked it by leaving paper markers, or anything else suitable, along the route.’
    • ‘U.S. and Iraqi forces drove south of that city's primary east-west highway, having blazed a trail with warplanes and distant artillery.’
    • ‘The North Sea Cycle Route officially opened yesterday as two German cyclists blazed a trail into the city, making the inaugural journey on the route.’
    • ‘Nothing is more adventurous and thrilling than blazing a trail across unmarked snow like a modern day pioneer exploring unknown lands, schussing into history.’
    • ‘Right now they're blazing a trail through the wilderness in South Carolina and ‘chopping up boulders.’’

Origin

Mid 17th century: ultimately of Germanic origin; related to German Blässe blaze and blass pale, also to blaze, and probably to blemish.

Pronunciation:

blaze

/bleɪz/

Main definitions of blaze in English

: blaze1blaze2blaze3

blaze3

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Present or proclaim (news) in a prominent, typically sensational, manner:

    ‘‘Pop stars and drugs’ blazed the headline’
    • ‘Meanwhile, the headlines in the newspapers blazed MUTILATOR STRIKES AGAIN.’
    • ‘Across the nation and around the free world this week the headlines blazed a New Year's warning to world Communism: the U.S. would tolerate no Communist move into any part of the Middle East, and would fight, if necessary, to prevent it.’
    • ‘On the day of his funeral, one of England’s best-read papers blazed forth these banner headlines: ‘Granite May Crumble, But This Is Living Stone!’’
    • ‘This week the headlines of all the major papers blazed, ‘NASDAQ tops 5000.’’
    • ‘Headlines blazed that the debt rose 36% in January, which was said to be evidence of rising consumer confidence.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘blow out on a trumpet’): from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch blāzen to blow; related to blow.

Pronunciation:

blaze

/bleɪz/