Definition of blatant in English:

blatant

adjective

  • 1(of bad behaviour) done openly and unashamedly.

    ‘blatant lies’
    • ‘They were content to overlook all but the most blatant infractions.’
    • ‘The leaders find themselves in more trouble than their predecessors faced over much more blatant war lies.’
    • ‘Generally the tradition is to tell lies so blatant that even small children spot them.’
    • ‘It was a blatant lie, and both men knew it, but neither cared all that much.’
    • ‘There's no blatant lie in that sentence but it's hardly the whole truth either is it?’
    • ‘To credit the newspaper, they did retract the quote once it was exposed as a blatant lie.’
    • ‘I'd just like to expose this statement as a blatant pack of lies.’
    • ‘Given the blatant bias in the reporting, the whole study has to be suspect.’
    • ‘It is amazing that we put up with such blatant rip-offs and someone suggested that we think with our feet and shop around.’
    • ‘It is nothing but a blatant act of unilateral intervention, outside the UN umbrella.’
    • ‘Challenge those responsible for this blatant neglect and the place instantly takes on the air of the confessional.’
    • ‘Magistrates described his driving record as horrendous and said he was in blatant breach of a court order.’
    • ‘Prejudice that blatant doesn't usually get aired outside the pub these days.’
    • ‘One of the soldiers responsible for this act of blatant provocation explained the rationale.’
    • ‘He told a blatant lie to all students last time round.’
    • ‘It may be that the source and schemes behind these blatant lies can be revealed by a court case.’
    • ‘He stands there, squinting his eyes and pursing his lips, going on and on with such blatant lies.’
    • ‘I think that we know that there are blatant lies that are being told by both camps.’
    • ‘Think of the company, and its blatant disregard for honesty, fair competition and legal strictures.’
    • ‘The abuse was very blatant and it shocked me that it could be so overt.’
    flagrant, glaring, obvious, undisguised, unconcealed, overt, open, transparent, patent, evident, manifest, palpable, unmistakable
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    1. 1.1 Completely lacking in subtlety; very obvious.
      ‘despite their blatant attraction to each other they try to stay just friends’
      ‘incredibly blatant product placement’
      • ‘His article was not only disappointing but appeared to be blatant propaganda.’
      • ‘He called the advertising a blatant attempt to buy votes for the coming election.’
      • ‘When blatant opportunities arose for commentary, the main issue was left out entirely.’
      • ‘Perhaps I'd just misunderstood, or squandered a blatant opportunity, I thought.’
      • ‘This is a good time to show off a bit of yourself - either as blatant or subtle as you wish.’
      • ‘Such a blatant lack of interest in her children's education was shocking - but sadly not exceptional.’
      • ‘What are hundreds of children going to ask or think when they see this blatant advertisement for sexual equipment?’
      • ‘In fact, I can't really think of any other blatant examples of this phenomenon right now.’
      • ‘It is, however, one of the most blatant examples of companies trying to pass off an advertisement as reality.’
      • ‘It is not too blatant and it might work as it allows people to move from one sphere to another without stepping into the rain.’
      • ‘This is no more blatant than anything that any other politician engages in on a daily basis.’
      • ‘The audience was not going to be satisfied with such a blatant appeal to sentimentality.’
      • ‘Many lecturers will drop hints, ranging from subtle to blatant, as to what will be in the exam.’
      • ‘The fact that such a detail stands out suggests the blatant lack of memorable songwriting and production on much of this album.’
      • ‘His action was too blatant, though still acceptable in the eyes of parliament.’
      • ‘This can be avoided by restricting blatant and misleading advertising in the media.’
      flagrant, glaring, obvious, overt, evident, conspicuous
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Origin

Late 16th century: perhaps an alteration of Scots blatand ‘bleating’. It was first used by Spenser as an epithet for a thousand-tongued monster produced by Cerberus and Chimaera, a symbol of calumny, which he called the blatant beast. It was subsequently used to mean ‘clamorous, offensive to the ear’, first of people (mid 17th century), later of things (late 18th century); the sense ‘unashamedly conspicuous’ arose in the late 19th century.

Pronunciation

blatant

/ˈbleɪt(ə)nt/