Definition of blast in English:

blast

noun

  • 1A destructive wave of highly compressed air spreading outwards from an explosion.

    ‘they were thrown backwards by the blast’
    • ‘Three other soldiers were wounded as the blast blew off the tanks turret, pinning them down.’
    • ‘They have described hearing a hissing noise like a giant pressure cooker letting off steam, seconds before a huge blast which blew one man 8ft into a locker.’
    • ‘The owner was not at home, but the blast blew out the front wall of his home and left him homeless.’
    • ‘The blast blew out windows in the room where the two met moments before.’
    • ‘The powerful blast blew pieces of the car five blocks away.’
    • ‘The blasts blew out the windows of nearby restaurants in the upscale neighbourhood.’
    • ‘Yesterday a fire service spokesman said: ‘The blast just blew the whole of the front of the shop off.’’
    • ‘The manager of the state fire investigations unit said the pressure wave from the blast was powerful enough to lift the roof off the building.’
    • ‘The blast caused a shock wave across the town, smashing windows and shaking houses.’
    • ‘The plane shuddered with shock waves from the blast.’
    • ‘As energy waves from the blasts travel through the ground they will be recorded by portable seismometers placed throughout the area.’
    • ‘The blast blew out windows and walls, overturned tables and cut electricity, plunging the hotel into eerie darkness.’
    • ‘The shock wave from the blast kills the majority of fish species on the reef and causes severe damage to its structure.’
    • ‘The blast blew the glass out of every apartment window in the block.’
    • ‘Nearly the entire ground floor had been blown out by the blast and what was left to support the building was burning.’
    • ‘He was in the kitchen of his home when the blast blew out the back door and demolished internal walls.’
    • ‘A concrete security barrier close to the embassy absorbed most of the blast and prevented further damage and injuries, officials said.’
    • ‘The lone human being in the area, a trapper living near the periphery of the blast, was blown off the porch of his shack, but survived.’
    • ‘The principal effect of a bomb is explosive blast, which may be combined with fragmentation or incendiary effects.’
    • ‘The resulting blast blew out all the windows, throwing debris up to 100 metres.’
    shock wave, pressure wave, bang, crash, crack
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An explosion or explosive firing.
      ‘a bomb blast’
      ‘a shotgun blast’
      • ‘In a land mine blast and a grenade attack on a camp, four security personnel died.’
      • ‘A spate of recent bomb blasts have scared people, maimed citizens, claimed hundreds of innocent lives and brought about suffering to the bereaved.’
      • ‘He had to fly in that cruel place, where the air is as destructive as a nuclear blast, for 4,000 miles.’
      • ‘Bomb attacks in London in 1992 resulted in guidance being published on how to design for bomb blasts.’
      • ‘Every now and then, we hear about daylight robberies, shootouts, murders and bomb blasts.’
      • ‘Later 20 people were wounded in a grenade blast which police said had been aimed at a security patrol but missed its target.’
      • ‘He swung the gun around, firing two sharp blasts at the other man.’
      • ‘They were accused of being the main conspirators and facilitators of the bomb blasts.’
      • ‘I was blissfully unaware of the bomb blasts until I got into office this morning.’
      • ‘Several tourists have been injured by bomb blasts in Spain in recent weeks.’
      • ‘A neighbor who heard the shotgun blasts went to investigate.’
      • ‘Small explosions and blasts spread through the sector, becoming larger along the way.’
      • ‘Between the energy wave and the rifle blasts, the door had become quite unstable.’
      • ‘The first man arrested by the police in connection with the latest bomb blasts turned out to have no connection with the suicide bombers.’
      • ‘Two bomb blasts and a bomb threat last week have caused tension and disturbance in the region.’
      • ‘Three police officers were wounded in a grenade blast earlier during the raid.’
      • ‘Many have expressed their pessimism over the police's ability to find the perpetrators in the latest bomb blasts.’
      • ‘The destructive blast impacted with the road to the left of the middle Jeep.’
      • ‘The shotgun blast was followed by a sharp percussive explosion as the entire hillside lit up in a white phosphorescent glare.’
      • ‘The race is on to save the lives of those injured by the bomb blasts; many tourists, however, are unaccounted for.’
      explosion, detonation, discharge, burst, eruption
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 A forceful attack or assault.
      ‘United's four-goal blast’
      barrage, cannonade, battery, bombardment, broadside, salvo, fusillade
      View synonyms
  • 2A strong gust of wind or air.

    ‘the icy blast hit them’
    • ‘Between the icy rain, the blasts of wind, and the crashing noise of the falls, the area seems desolate and terrible.’
    • ‘Suddenly a blast of wind rushed through the broken windows, pinning his hand to a wall.’
    • ‘Without warning, strong blasts of wind blew around them, ripping trees from their roots.’
    • ‘For once the weather bureau got it right and the predicted cold front arrived last night with a blast of icy wind.’
    • ‘They're going to take some getting used to, though at least the blast of fetid air from the tube station makes us feel right at home.’
    • ‘A blast of wind hit me but it was warm and sweet with the promise of Spring.’
    • ‘And then suddenly an icy blast of wind - she hadn't thought it was possible to get any colder - struck her body.’
    • ‘Their shapes were distorted by the howling blasts of icy wind.’
    • ‘The blast of cold wind almost hits me on the face, reminding of the real feel of Christmas in our place.’
    • ‘He pulled out his combat knife and punctured his air bag sending a blast of hot compressed air in his direction.’
    • ‘The machine injects a rod 15 inches into the ground before exploding a blast of compressed air to loosen the earth and help drainage.’
    • ‘As soon as she said that a blast of wind shot upward, making her hood fly off and her hair fly to the sky.’
    • ‘Right now the gutter looks good, warm somehow, perhaps half a degree safer than the blast of icy wind at head height.’
    • ‘Every time the doors of the tram opened a blast of icy wind came in.’
    • ‘The wind delivered consistent blasts in between gusts and gales.’
    • ‘She pulled her duster closer around her and shivered at the icy blast of wind Mother Nature sent her way.’
    • ‘I love winter, the chill in the air, how the fresh blast of wind brings colour to my cheeks.’
    • ‘When I stepped out of the car, I was hit with a blast of icy wind.’
    • ‘A blast of wind hit us in the face and the light blinded me temporarily.’
    • ‘I was suddenly hit by a sharp blast of cold wind; someone had opened the door.’
    gust, rush, blow, gale, squall, storm, wind, draught, waft, puff, flurry, breeze
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 A strong current of air used in smelting.
  • 3A single loud note of a horn, whistle, or similar.

    ‘a blast of the ship's siren’
    • ‘The album is studded throughout with glorious blasts of trumpet adding to the CD's general utter charm.’
    • ‘Entering the building, a blast of noise assaulted her ears.’
    • ‘In those days he didn't even have a police radio: three sharp blasts on a whistle was the only way to summon help.’
    • ‘Plumes of white vapor fill the air, and the blast of a steam whistle announces the train's departure.’
    • ‘Things make a rapid right turn with this song though - a blast of guitar bursts out unexpectedly.’
    • ‘The now familiar, spine chilling bugle gave a long blast and the enemy surged forward.’
    • ‘The air horn sounds a blast that can be heard over the roar of aircraft engines.’
    • ‘I was about to sob and lament to myself when I heard the loud blast of a horn.’
    • ‘From the edge of the field, the horns sounded a harsh blast.’
    • ‘Her mysterious silences and then her loud, abrupt blasts of sound had made him curious, so he walked to the door, and rested his had on the door knob.’
    • ‘After a forty-five minutes delay the lights came on and the familiar two blasts of the air horns sounded and we began to roll.’
    • ‘A blast of melody rang throughout the crowd, and immediately everyone began to dance around, grabbing the nearest person to be their partner.’
    • ‘As the runners were descending from England's highest mountain, they heard a scream and frantic blasts on an emergency whistle.’
    • ‘A trumpet blast echoed through his ears for a second time, announcing the start of the trek home.’
    • ‘He was awakened in the morning by a loud blast from an oxen horn.’
    • ‘The phrases noted above are like blasts from an air horn or plastic trumpet, blaring technical correctness.’
    • ‘If the animal is in your path, break firmly but avoid swerving and sound your horn in short blasts to frighten the animal away.’
    • ‘By 10 am a few sheets of lightening and blasts of thunder echoed throughout the valley.’
    • ‘Suddenly, a huge flash and a blast of thunder blew out of the forest, sending birds flapping away in torrents.’
    • ‘A screeching sound and the blast of a car horn told her that she had narrowly missed a collision with a fellow driver.’
    blare, blaring, honk, bellow, boom, roar, screech, wail
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  • 4informal A severe reprimand.

    ‘I braced myself for the inevitable blast’
    • ‘He retired after only a single appointed term, issuing a public blast against his own party and virtually inviting the opposition to take over his seat.’
    • ‘The tennis prodigy offers a refreshingly impolite blast to his critics from the US Open before heading home.’
    • ‘She gives the leftie columnist a big blast for the dishonesty of his criticisms.’
    • ‘So it is no mystery why my blast at the historian did not get the attention his did.’
    • ‘Another blast of criticism was aimed at the good lady wife of the rock musician.’
    reprimand, rebuke, reproof, admonishment, admonition, reproach, reproval, scolding, remonstration, upbraiding, castigation, lambasting, lecture, criticism, censure
    View synonyms
  • 5North American informal An enjoyable experience or lively party.

    ‘it could turn out to be a real blast’
    • ‘I had the greatest time, some of those rides are a real blast.’
    • ‘I can't wait to party and have a blast at your restaurant!’
    • ‘Dancing with my friends was a blast, dancing with strangers was too.’
    • ‘She seemed to enjoy the extra room, and she had a blast attacking me all evening.’
    • ‘I had a blast at the party, meeting with and flirting outrageously with all the lovely men there, but not in a rude way.’
    • ‘When it works out, it's a real blast to see all these people come there and have a good time.’
    • ‘It's a real blast, even for those who aren't hardcore fans of the series.’
    • ‘The food was certainly satisfying, wholesome and tasty and the experience was a blast.’
    • ‘For the most part, all the fans I spoke to were a real blast, and very good sports.’
    • ‘My first show was a blast - I took second in the novice lightweight class!’
    • ‘The party had been a blast, but the cleaning up was no fun.’
    • ‘The energy was fantastic and even the people backstage were having a blast.’
    • ‘As long as you know what to expect and are well prepared, drift diving can be a real blast!’
    • ‘And most importantly of all, these two-seater ragtops are a real blast to drive.’
    • ‘For instance, if a good friend of yours threw a party that was a blast (save for a few minor glitches), you'd commend her.’
    • ‘I went there last night for the first time - what a blast!’
    • ‘She had a blast at the post-concert party last Saturday.’
    • ‘Kids of all ages can have a blast on cross country skis.’
    • ‘The first time was a great time, the second time was a blast.’
    • ‘The crew, nerds given the opportunity to create worlds, are having a blast making the movie; and so are the stars.’
    social gathering, gathering, social occasion, social event, social function, function, get-together, celebration, reunion, festivity, jamboree, reception, at-home, soirée, social
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verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Blow up or break apart (something solid) with explosives.

    ‘the school was blasted by an explosion’
    • ‘From a safe distance, a disposal expert presses a button, triggering an explosion which blasts the mine to pieces.’
    • ‘We all knew we were off to a good start since no one was blown or blasted into smithereens from any explosions.’
    • ‘One tornado blasted apart a theatre just minutes after a movie ended.’
    • ‘The attacking vehicles had been blasted apart, so there wasn't much left to salvage from them.’
    • ‘He returned fire again, blasting a missile complex into atoms before moving back in the line to allow the undamaged ships access to the battle.’
    • ‘The bomb was used by the air force to blast helicopter landing zones in dense undergrowth.’
    • ‘A van filled with homemade explosives blasts the federal building in the city.’
    • ‘The explosion blasted the vessel into fragments, split the bed of the harbour and sent a mushroom cloud of smoke and debris surging three miles into the sky.’
    • ‘Actually, the present lava dome at Mount St Helens is the third dome to form since the 1980 eruption, the previous two having been blasted away by the subsequent eruptions.’
    • ‘You can see big chunks of this pillar have been blasted away by a bomb - and rather clumsily filled in with grey plaster later on.’
    • ‘The builders blasted out the foundations of the old property with dynamite in order to fit in the base of the new house.’
    • ‘As the doors were blasted away, an audible gasp was heard from within.’
    • ‘Explosions or collisions blast the objects into smaller pieces, increasing the number of objects further.’
    • ‘Trees were broken and cracked open, and buildings had been blasted apart as if by dynamite.’
    • ‘Several whole windows would have to be blasted out before a plane would depressurize enough to threaten life within the cabin.’
    • ‘A suicide car bomber blasted a crowd of police recruits in the small town.’
    • ‘The windows and doors were all blasted away, but the main structure stood solid, and they survived with but a few scratches.’
    • ‘Another explosion blasted the other end of the street apart.’
    • ‘The missiles struck her, blasting apart most of her engines and missile launchers.’
    • ‘Every piece of the hard rock had to be blasted out before being broken up with pick and shovel.’
    blow up, bomb, blow, blow to pieces, dynamite, explode
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    1. 1.1 Produce (damage) by means of an explosion.
      ‘the force of the collision blasted out a tremendous crater’
      • ‘With a dramatic swish of his cape, he ran out the hole he had blasted, jumping incredible distances just like the creatures they had faced.’
      • ‘Some of the dazed survivors, seeing a hole had been blasted in the wall, ran for it.’
      • ‘It took fifteen minutes in order to find an opening in the fortress, a large hole blasted in the side of it.’
      • ‘They had merrily managed to blast several large holes in the nearby walls, causing general mayhem.’
      • ‘Troops found the church with large holes blasted out of its cement walls and its tin roof collapsed.’
      • ‘She then flew up as his plasma canon blasted away a large crater.’
      • ‘They blast holes in the walls and enter through them from one home to the next.’
      • ‘The impact will blast a hole in the comet the size of a football stadium, officials say.’
      • ‘This allows the attacking soldiers access to the building through holes blasted in the walls.’
      • ‘It took eighteen months to blast out the first four tunnels which were within a mile and a half of the beginning.’
      • ‘Note the bullet holes in the wall, and the mortar hole blasted through the walls in the background.’
      • ‘The new pictures show that most of the moon is dark, but impacts have blasted holes in the surface to reveal much brighter material underneath.’
      • ‘A large hole has been blasted into the mountain, where cement, stones and steel bars pile high, destroying the greenland.’
      • ‘He leaped at her but she just kicked him away before blasting out an exit in the wall.’
      • ‘The raised cap of limestone has been blasted out.’
    2. 1.2with object and adverbial of direction Force or throw (something) in a specified direction by impact or explosion.
      ‘the car was blasted thirty feet into the sky’
      • ‘This video has something of the emotional effect you get when you see the video from the Saturn V launch that blasted the first humans at the moon.’
      • ‘Emergency workers blasted through solid rock from an adjacent mine to reach the miners.’
      • ‘A huge black blur struck the ground where he'd been standing scant instants ago, and a shower of dirt was blasted upwards from the impact.’
      • ‘The rocket launcher allows you to blast rockets in the air.’
      • ‘The impact blasted watermelons and oranges and tomatoes all over the sidewalk.’
      • ‘The explosion blasted her off the cliff, but she was holding herself up by a claw.’
      • ‘It blasts them three feet a second, in a soaring arc that carries them as far as two feet away.’
      • ‘The explosion then blasts the elements into interstellar space.’
      • ‘A fourth Army helicopter was blasted out of the sky by ground fire earlier this year during a raid on a suspected terrorist camp.’
      • ‘Explosion after explosion erupted, blasting dirt, mud and smoke high into the air.’
      • ‘The masked men attacking him turned to give me a startled look before they were blasted into the air by some invisible force that seemed to flow from inside of me.’
      propel, project, send forth, eject, deliver, discharge, spout, fire, shoot, catapult, launch, release, force, push, impel, ram
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    3. 1.3 Shoot with a gun.
      ‘Fowler was blasted with an air rifle’
      • ‘Before the stupid creature knew it, I had blasted several rounds of fire from my weapon.’
      • ‘He was able to bring up his gun quickly enough and started blasting at whoever or whatever was in that direction.’
      • ‘Thrill seekers who blasted a car dealership with BB guns came under fire from community leaders who are calling for the toy weapons to be outlawed.’
      • ‘His cruiser had blasted more holes into the starboard side of the alien mothership.’
      • ‘She fired a shot, blasting the hinge off the door.’
      • ‘In a separate incident, a woman was critically ill in hospital last night after she was blasted with a shotgun in her house.’
      • ‘The more unusual ways of scattering ashes include packing them into fireworks which are then fired into the sky and putting ashes in shotgun cartridges to be blasted away.’
      • ‘He was still firing at the control booth, blasting bigger holes in it than the pirates themselves had managed.’
      • ‘Before she could do too much damage, he used a hidden gun to blast her away.’
      • ‘She blasted him in the face with a shot of plasma, more than likely killing the pilot instantly.’
      • ‘He stood up from behind the couch and opened fire, blasting the doorframe next to his enemy's head.’
      • ‘A man was blasted in the foot by a gunman who fled the scene.’
      • ‘In his mind, he blasted six large holes in the blimp's gas cells.’
      • ‘Both of the metal slabs on his hips unfolded into their gun modes and began blasting away the enemy units two at a time.’
      • ‘Helicopter gunships blasted the town last week.’
      • ‘She blasted the ship with heavy cannon fire.’
      • ‘He brought the gun around and prepared himself to blast at anything that moved.’
      • ‘He turned and began to fire his machine gun wildly before he was blasted full of holes.’
      fire, fire away, shoot, shoot away, blaze, blaze away, let fly
      shoot, shoot down, gun down, mow down, cut down, put a bullet in, pick off, bag, fell, kill
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4no object, with adverbial of direction Move very quickly and loudly in a specified direction.
      ‘four low-flying jets blasted down the glen’
      • ‘Sitting in the carpark, watching the sheets of rain blasting across the tarmac, there really wasn't much else to do but go home.’
      • ‘From there the heat blasts right through the interior window shade and into your home.’
      • ‘The wind was blasting hard into my face and against my body.’
      • ‘I wrenched around, my blood pressure blasting into the stratosphere.’
      • ‘She blasted out of the blocks and immediately established her dominance over the other runners.’
      • ‘Heat blasted back into their faces from the barrage, yet still the armies advanced.’
      • ‘As the runner blasted out of the blocks in the 400 metres last week, it looked like she might make qualification.’
      • ‘An icy wind blasted down my street, funnelling and whipping wet hair across my face.’
      • ‘The blow dryer slipped out of his hands and I grimaced as the hot air blasted directly on my face.’
      • ‘Smoke blasts through chimneys and the odd crevice, as if to remind you that this machine belongs to the era of steam power.’
      • ‘She opened the nozzle and a powerful stream blasted out onto the hillside behind the house.’
      • ‘With gale-force winds blasting throughout the cabin, I concentrated on stabilizing the hose.’
      • ‘Rain came blasting down from the once-clear-of-clouds cloudy sky onto her face, trickling down her cheeks.’
      • ‘A wave of power blasted in the direction of the hunters, knocking them off their feet.’
      • ‘They blasted past the ship in one of the speedboats to quickly survey the reef's outer walls.’
      • ‘Bits of silver metal blasted in every direction.’
      • ‘Foot traffic blasted by him, men and women, in pairs, in groups, all alone.’
      • ‘The students began blasting past cars and began heading towards the airport entrance.’
      • ‘A gust of wind blasts against his face, carrying with it the scent of rot and decay and the suggestion of whispers.’
      • ‘The ramp extended and a frigid wind blasted through the opening.’
  • 2Produce or cause to produce loud continuous music or other noise.

    no object ‘music blasted out at full volume’
    with object ‘an impatient motorist blasted his horn’
    • ‘Hands wave madly in the air as the first grinding guitar riff blasts through the speakers.’
    • ‘I went straight into my room and started to sleep, only to be awoken by loud pop music blasting in my ears.’
    • ‘The workers customised the float with campaign slogans and blasted out classic tunes from popular bands.’
    • ‘I started the car and blasted the radio, as I put it in reverse and drove out.’
    • ‘As the singer's voice blasted across the stadium, I quickly became disenchanted with the bottled sound of the band.’
    • ‘So, if you like your country-ish rock complete with slide guitars and a little twang, feel free to blast it out your car stereo this summer.’
    • ‘The sweet sounds of the band blasted out of the speakers.’
    • ‘A supertanker, bulldozing down right behind us, blasted her bullhorn and sent us hightailing it back toward the shoreline.’
    • ‘Could someone indicate to the technicians that we are being blasted out by the sound system?’
    • ‘Extravagantly costumed masquerade troupes shimmied down the streets as trucks with speakers piled high blasted out calypso and soul.’
    • ‘Hundreds of other drinkers packed into the warren of rooms as the star's voice blasted out of the sound system.’
    • ‘The noise once again began blasting louder and louder.’
    • ‘Pupils aged between five and 18 blasted out renditions of well-known songs.’
    • ‘The stereo blasted loudly as the people on the streets flashed by the window at unreal speeds.’
    • ‘The stereo blasted out an endless stream of dance music as they swayed and sweated with the rest.’
    • ‘I heard the TV blasting loudly in the living room where she was and felt my blood boil.’
    • ‘The car behind you blasted its horn because you let a pedestrian finish crossing.’
    • ‘Whenever someone is out, the loudspeaker blasts out a 10 second clip of some corny but apt popular music tune.’
    • ‘The body beside him slumped forward onto the steering wheel and the horn blasted loudly through the silence.’
    • ‘In the last of a series of protests and parties by radical groups, youths drank and danced as a stereo system blasted out tunes.’
    honk, sound loudly, trumpet, blare, boom, roar
    blare, boom, roar, thunder, bellow, pump, shriek, screech
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  • 3Kick or strike (a ball) hard.

    ‘the striker blasted the free kick into the net’
    • ‘He chested the ball on to Robinson who blasted his 30 yard effort over the bar.’
    • ‘He stands over the free-kick and blasts the ball hopelessly at the US wall.’
    • ‘The young Motherwell striker managed to blast the ball into the side netting.’
    • ‘He blasted home the free kick as the game entered injury time.’
    • ‘Is it wise to just blast the ball as hard as possible or should the player take the more cultured approach and go for accuracy?’
    • ‘He blasted 17 fours and four sixes in an unbeaten 101, both reaching his ton and winning the match with his final six.’
    • ‘From the subsequent free kick, he blasted the ball just wide.’
    • ‘He blasted in a great ball that ricocheted against the post and rebounded back into play.’
    • ‘In one fluid movement, he flicks the ball from his left foot on to his right foot, then blasts a volley into the net.’
    • ‘In the first minute the Kendal striker blasted a shot just wide.’
    • ‘Within seconds all Jack's hard work looks wasted as Caniza wriggles free and blasts the ball past him.’
    • ‘His through ball put his teammate clear, but as the shot fell to him on his weaker left foot, he blasted his shot over.’
    • ‘I gave him another stare, did a bit of a dummy, and blasted the ball as hard as I could.’
    • ‘He made no mistake with the free kick, blasting the ball into the top left hand corner of the net.’
    • ‘His first action of the game is to hack down Frei and Hakan Yakin blasts the resulting free kick wide of the right upright.’
    • ‘Then, four minutes from time, the striker blasted the ball against the bar with an empty net in front of him.’
    • ‘He blasted a twenty yard free kick inches over the crossbar.’
    • ‘Aftab blasted Gillespie's first ball over mid-wicket for six and then scampered a single from the next ball to seal a win.’
    • ‘Instead of blasting the ball wide of Main, the striker elected to shoot straight at the keeper.’
    • ‘Which can you blast harder, a tennis serve or a slap shot?’
    • ‘Up stepped Parker to blast the ball past Marshall from the resultant kick.’
    • ‘He hit almost half his side's total of 269-6, blasting 19 fours and three sixes.’
  • 4informal Criticize fiercely.

    ‘the school was blasted by government inspectors’
    • ‘It was also a colossal failure, shunned by audiences and blasted by critics as ‘pretentious.’’
    • ‘I suppose that some people may blast me for these criticisms and claim that they found his adventures compelling.’
    • ‘Democrats are already blasting him for what they say are his extreme views.’
    • ‘She has been blasted by one of Hollywood's top directors, as one of the rudest women in the industry.’
    • ‘General election candidates were blasted yesterday for sending thousands of unsolicited vote-getting phone messages to their constituents.’
    • ‘The president is already blasting congress for spending too much.’
    • ‘He has blasted the Mansfield striker's ‘poor attitude’ during his loan stay at Wetherby Road.’
    • ‘In recent years, the council has been blasted with icy criticisms from residents unhappy with the authority's winter road policies.’
    • ‘She has blasted the senator's criticism of the war by reminding viewers that he voted for the war.’
    • ‘Last night, he blasted someone in the audience for booing the mere mention of that band.’
    • ‘Critics blasted him for pouring taxpayer funds into badly managed banks and unneeded infrastructure projects.’
    • ‘Some critics have blasted him for connecting violence at home to a past history of bloodshed and aggression abroad.’
    • ‘They've yet to call a press conference to blast the damage these warped images can do to the psyche of young people in this country.’
    • ‘Just as I marched up, the commander came up in a car and blasted the hell out of me for putting a tent up where it was.’
    • ‘Then he blasts the leader for not doing enough to fight AIDS.’
    • ‘Rail bosses have been blasted for a lack of information on new timetables which have just gone up at the station.’
    • ‘A farmer has blasted officials who threw out his appeal over rights of way across his land.’
    • ‘The association blasted an independent report released by the government yesterday claiming speed cameras save lives.’
    • ‘Conservatives question whether TV ads for a new film blasting the president could unfairly impact voters.’
    • ‘The fire station officer blasted the firebugs for their stupidity.’
    • ‘Now, she's blasting a judge for releasing two suspects held in her daughter's still unresolved case.’
    reprimand, rebuke, criticize, upbraid, berate, castigate, reprove, rail at, flay
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  • 5literary (of a wind or other natural force) wither, shrivel, or blight (a plant)

    ‘corn blasted before it be grown up’
    blight, kill, destroy, wither, shrivel
    View synonyms
    1. 5.1 Strike with divine anger (used to express annoyance or dislike)
      ‘damn and blast this awful place!’
      • ‘Tom won the descent blast him!’
    2. 5.2 Destroy or ruin.
      ‘your reputation is blasted already in the village’
      • ‘It's not as if the candidate's crew hadn't already tried to blast his opponent to smithereens.’
      • ‘He has not yet had his trial but his life has already been blasted into disarray.’
      • ‘As for Glasgow, they've already blasted Munster off the park in the Celtic League.’
      destroy, crush, dash, blight, wreck, ruin, spoil, mar, annihilate, disappoint, frustrate
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exclamation

British
informal
  • Expressing annoyance.

    ‘‘Blast! The car won't start!’’
    damn, damnation, blast, hell, heck, gordon bennett
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • a blast from the past

    • informal Something powerfully nostalgic.

      ‘the soundtrack is a real blast from the past’
      • ‘Most of the cars dated from the 1950s and 60s, and according to the organiser, the outing proved a real blast from the past for the older generation.’
      • ‘It was a real blast from the past for them when we published photographs that had never been collected from a developing laboratory.’
      • ‘Wow - what a blast from the past to see a list of my old co-workers.’
      • ‘Here's a little blast from the past.’
      • ‘This little gem of a workout is a blast from the past because it requires only minimal equipment and a place to run or walk.’
      • ‘I got an e-mail the other day from an old friend, one of those blasts from the past that take you back in time.’
      • ‘The old photographs were also a blast from the past for the family.’
      • ‘This morning, while listening to the radio on the way to work, I heard an absolutely great blast from the past!’
      • ‘For those of us who were active in the antiwar movement, it's a blast from the past.’
      • ‘It's a blast from the past, mid-1960s or very early 1970s at the latest, when these crushed coloured glass in resin things were popular.’
  • (at) full blast

    • At maximum power or intensity.

      ‘the heat is on full blast’
      • ‘He deplored the fact that the factory was started up at night and was going at full blast.’
      • ‘Then she drove home with the radio on full blast.’
      • ‘You get out of your car and the fiery heat hits you full blast.’
      • ‘Even with the air-conditioning going full blast, the sun began to turn his car into an oven.’
      • ‘Police cars swirled all over the ground, surrounding the crowd, lights and sirens on, full blast.’
      • ‘This song, like many others on the album, was written to be played at full blast.’
      • ‘As the theatre group set up, I was treated to all my favorite pop songs played at full blast.’
      • ‘The worst causes are dogs barking for long periods, and people who play their music too loudly or have their TV on full blast.’
      • ‘It took three enormous blankets and a heater on full blast to keep me warm.’
      • ‘Start up the engine and run the heat at full blast again until you're warm.’
      with great force, full force, with full force, full blast, with a will, for all one is worth, with might and main, with all the stops out, all out, with a vengeance, vigorously, energetically, strongly, powerfully, madly
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Phrasal Verbs

  • blast off

    • (of a rocket or spacecraft) take off from a launching site.

      ‘space shuttles generally blast off with a minimum of fuss’
      • ‘Above our heads an enormous spaceship blasts off into a star-filled sky.’
      • ‘I wouldn't want to miss it when the rocket blasts off.’
      • ‘Europe's heavy lifting rocket has successfully blasted off from French Guiana with two telecoms satellites on board.’
      • ‘A privately-built rocket blasted off into suborbital space above California's Mojave Desert today.’
      • ‘The captain pushes the start button and suddenly the spaceship blasts off into outer space!’
      • ‘The rockets of the ship flared and they blasted off.’
      • ‘The next inhabitants of the International Space Station blasted off aboard a Russian Soyuz rocket, just after one o'clock this morning.’
      • ‘The spacecraft will blast off on 26 October on a journey that will take it approximately five months.’
      • ‘Current polar satellite launch vehicles can blast off carrying 1,000 to 1,200-kilogram units.’
      • ‘His mind fills with images of sleek, silvery rockets, blasting off into space.’
      be launched, take off, lift off, leave the ground, become airborne, take to the air
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Origin

Old English blǣst, of Germanic origin; related to blaze.

Pronunciation

blast

/blɑːst/