Definition of blanket in English:

blanket

noun

  • 1A large piece of woollen or similar material used as a covering on a bed or elsewhere for warmth.

    ‘I slept on the ground covered by my blanket’
    • ‘There are plenty of woollen blankets and fluffy white towels.’
    • ‘Try changing feather pillows, woollen blankets and woollen clothing to cotton or synthetic materials.’
    • ‘Shivering, Robyn wrapped herself up in the blanket for warmth.’
    • ‘Actually, there wasn't much to make, all she had to do was puff the pillow and throw the blanket over the bed.’
    • ‘Daniel sits on a sofa cushion, with a blanket thrown over his shoulders, eating a bowl of cereal.’
    • ‘It was the kind of warmth like pulling blankets out of the dryer and wrapping them around you in the middle of winter.’
    • ‘Her teeth are chattering, and I run to get a blanket to throw over her.’
    • ‘The sheets on his bed were a dark red satin, with a fur blanket for warmth.’
    • ‘After cuddling in the cozy warmth of her blankets for several minutes, Abbey got out of bed and slipped her feet into her silk slippers.’
    • ‘Not even a hand had snuck out from under the cozy warmth of the blankets.’
    • ‘As I lay under the warmth of his blankets, tranquility seeped into my body.’
    • ‘I slowly rolled out of bed Monday morning, not wanting to leave the warmth of my blankets.’
    • ‘The park was filled with strolling tourists, courting couples and a few people lying on blankets enjoying the warmth of the late sun.’
    • ‘She nodded snuggling deeper into the blankets and stealing their warmth.’
    • ‘She swung her legs over the side of the bed, and threw off her down blanket.’
    • ‘Her whole body was suddenly covered in the warmth as if a blanket had just been pulled over her.’
    • ‘Remove cushions and soft toys, and buy bedding made from synthetic fabric rather than using feather pillows and woollen blankets.’
    • ‘Quickly she snuggled back into the warmth of the blankets.’
    • ‘She squirmed a bit until she was engulfed by the blankets - and the warmth that they brought with them.’
    • ‘I'm convalescing amidst the warmth of piled blankets and the hiss of the radiator.’
    cover, covering, rug, afghan, quilt, eiderdown, duvet
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    1. 1.1 A thick covering mass or layer.
      ‘a dense grey blanket of cloud’
      • ‘The stars were hidden behind a thick blanket of clouds only revealed in brief patches.’
      • ‘The sky outside was still wrapped in the thick blanket of nighttime.’
      • ‘The thick blanket of depression stole around her, enticing her into the depths of a silent quagmire with it's sullen truths.’
      • ‘A thick blanket of snow thwarted the efforts of search and rescue teams hunting for the missing woman yesterday.’
      • ‘She now realized why bandits would choose a place like this to hang out, for it quickly got dark inside the forest, under the thick blanket of leaves.’
      • ‘The low temperatures, combined with the thick blanket of dust surrounding the embryonic star, means the process of star creation cannot presently be measured.’
      • ‘The sky was gray, a blanket of clouds hanging in the sky, the beginnings of autumn chill in the barest puff of a breeze.’
      • ‘Of all the things I did not expect to be a factor in my morning commute, I woke to the thickest blanket of fog ever.’
      • ‘At this time of year, plants are tucked up for the winter under a thick blanket of winter mulch.’
      • ‘The corridor is usually full of people puffing away and a thick blanket of smoke hangs in the air.’
      • ‘The district woke up to a thick blanket of snow this morning as the country's cold entered its most bitter phase.’
      • ‘The city is the first thing I see from my bedroom window when I roll up the blinds of a morning, except on those days when it is shrouded in a thick blanket of damp mist.’
      • ‘By the time 5:00 pm came around the sun had gone completely, covered by a thick blanket of clouds.’
      • ‘A thick blanket of snow coated the earth and the tall pines I was surrounded by were heavily laden with white powder.’
      • ‘We drove into a thick blanket of fog, and everything was lost.’
      • ‘Outside, dim diffuse light indicated the presence of dawn, but everything was shrouded in a thick blanket of mist.’
      • ‘Unfortunately for all the fans, a thick blanket of fog rolled in making it impossible to see.’
      • ‘Showering and dressing, still in a dream, we looked with horror out of the window and saw a thick blanket of fog hiding the street.’
      • ‘This morning we awoke to a thick blanket of snow, and it's still coming down.’
      • ‘The sky was completely covered by a thick blanket of clouds.’
      covering, layer, cover, coat, coating, film, sheet, carpet, veneer, surface, skin, thickness, overlay, cloak, mantle, veil, pall, shroud, screen, mask, cloud, curtain
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  • 2Printing
    A rubber surface used for transferring the image in ink from the plate to the paper in offset printing.

adjective

  • attributive Covering all cases or instances; total and inclusive.

    ‘a blanket ban on tobacco advertising’
    • ‘Local authorities will not have the right to issue blanket bans on gambling.’
    • ‘There are real fears that many coal merchants, dockers and hauliers will be seriously affected if the Government's blanket ban goes ahead.’
    • ‘They want employers to introduce a blanket ban on internal e-mails and get staff walking around the office.’
    • ‘The association chairman said only a complete blanket ban on smoking in pubs would work.’
    • ‘The effect of the memo on workers, particularly among less confident journalists, was a blanket ban on anyone who held anti-war views.’
    • ‘However, this is entirely possible without a divisive blanket ban.’
    • ‘Licensees say there is no support for a blanket ban that would devastate the city's £200m-a-year night time economy.’
    • ‘The traditional smoky Irish pub will be officially consigned to the past today as a blanket ban on smoking in the workplace comes into force.’
    • ‘But a blanket ban serves only to prevent the public from knowing what really happened last week.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, the European commission seems to have scotched the idea of local authorities imposing any sort of blanket ban.’
    • ‘In the 1960s, most countries imposed blanket speed limits.’
    • ‘My first step will be to remove the insect killer tubelight setup on each floor, and issue a blanket ban on all insect repellants.’
    • ‘What will the impact of a blanket ban be?’
    • ‘There is no general blanket rule, but being safe and taking those precautions are the most important things.’
    • ‘They are compiling a list of skating no-go areas around the parish - and a blanket ban on skateboarding in unsociable hours is also being put forward.’
    • ‘With this blanket ban on so many aspects of news coverage, you just don't know who to trust anymore.’
    • ‘The health minister plans to include pubs in a blanket ban on smoking in the workplace.’
    • ‘It was just a general, unspecific blanket condemnation of that sort of thing, you know, to keep up appearances.’
    • ‘The government decided to put a blanket ban on all foreign adoptions so no one outside can adopt a foreign child.’
    • ‘The director of the civil rights group said blanket bans cause unacceptable breaches of innocent people's human rights.’
    wholesale, across the board, outright, indiscriminate, overall, general, mass, umbrella, inclusive, all-inclusive, all-round, sweeping, total, complete, comprehensive, thorough, extensive, wide-ranging, far-reaching, large-scale, widespread
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verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Cover completely with a thick layer of something.

    ‘the countryside was blanketed in snow’
    • ‘The area was blanketed in an icy fog and the road was slushy from an early morning snowfall.’
    • ‘What land wasn't covered with homes was blanketed in lush, never-ending meadows and fields.’
    • ‘The photo reveals a thick layer of dust blanketing the floor and wall of the summit crater atop the tall volcano.’
    • ‘And when winter comes, the open fields are blanketed in a layer of blinding, white snow.’
    • ‘The mountainside was blanketed in trees and shrubs, making it impossible to see through the thick vegetation.’
    • ‘He gave one pull, and the entire floor was blanketed in utter blackness.’
    • ‘When the forest floor is blanketed in snow, the birds use their powerful bills to dig out ant nests from tree trunks and tree bases.’
    • ‘The stage is blanketed in darkness until a shadowy figure comes out with a glowing candle in one hand.’
    • ‘With all its grandeur, the place was blanketed in an age-old sorrow.’
    • ‘In the film, a town in Maine is blanketed in a thick soup of slow moving fog.’
    • ‘He could only stand and watch as all three Genos were blanketed in heavy gun fire.’
    • ‘Several inches had fallen since it began late the previous night, and the outside of the train station was blanketed in a layer of white.’
    • ‘The sky was blanketed in dark gray clouds and a light snow fluttered to Earth.’
    • ‘The only distinguishing feature was a silver doorknob, blanketed with a thick layer of dust.’
    • ‘A thick, dark layer of smoke is blanketing much of Los Angeles and still the cause of the fire is unknown.’
    • ‘The town was blanketed in thick black smoke after arsonists set fire to material in the long awaited new hospital extension.’
    • ‘As a result, whole swathes of the park are blanketed in droppings.’
    • ‘The grass was blanketed in flowers and the air was heavy with fragrance.’
    • ‘Upon reaching the ski area, the whole village was blanketed in pure white snow.’
    • ‘A blinding coat of white blanketed the thick shrubbery that defined my garden.’
    cover, coat, carpet, overlay, overlie, overspread, extend over, cap, top, crown
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    1. 1.1 Stifle or keep quiet (sound)
      ‘the double glazing blankets the noise a bit’
      • ‘The hot, dry wind that continually blew off the Mongolian plains had blanketed any sound of their approach.’
      • ‘It is not unusual to see the fish finder screen showing the hard echo of the wreck blanketed by fish both up and downtide of the wreck.’
      muffle, deaden, soften, mute, silence, quieten, smother, dampen, damp down, tone down, mask, suppress, reduce, abate, kill
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  • 2Sailing
    Take wind from the sails of (another craft) by passing to windward.

    • ‘That should blanket the spinnaker behind the mainsail so that there is very little pressure on it.’
    • ‘When you spike the tack shackle the pressure is completely released from the sail and the sail is blanketed behind the mainsail.’

Phrases

  • born on the wrong side of the blanket

    • dated Illegitimate.

      • ‘He was born on the wrong side of the blanket, as they say.’
      • ‘There is speculation that he was born on the wrong side of the blanket, as the illegitimate son of a local squire.’
      • ‘The children born on the wrong side of the blanket came from twenty different mothers, nineteen of whom had one each, while one woman had five.’
      • ‘Can you name three individuals born on the wrong side of the blanket who eventually came to wear crowns?’
      • ‘He may have been born on the wrong side of the blanket, but he's everything a proper lord should be.’
      • ‘Well meaning professionals believed that adopted children would benefit by being shielded from the shame of being born on the wrong side of the blanket.’
      • ‘If she was perchance born on the wrong side of the blanket, then she cannot become an earl's wife.’
      • ‘It is a simple story of an unfortunate who had the misfortune to be born on the wrong side of the blanket.’
      • ‘This is the story of a man born on the wrong side of the blanket, a fugitive from the King's justice, and the finest swordsman in all of France.’
      • ‘But will today's audiences care about a bed-hopping rogue born on the wrong side of the blanket who eventually finds true love?’
      born out of wedlock, born of unmarried parents
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Origin

Middle English (denoting undyed woollen cloth): via Old Northern French from Old French blanc ‘white’, ultimately of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation

blanket

/ˈblaŋkɪt/