Definition of blandness in English:

blandness

noun

mass noun
  • 1Lack of strong emotions, features, or characteristics.

    ‘the overall blandness of his performance’
    • ‘He repeatedly aims for a mesmerizing mood, which can sometimes relax into blandness.’
    • ‘The claustrophobic blandness of my existence in suburban Buffalo blinded me from the legions of disaffected youth fighting the same battles.’
    • ‘An emphasis on naturalistic surface detail was in reaction against the blandness of much Neoclassical sculpture.’
    • ‘From the outer reaches of electronica, she comes engaged in a furious mission to save pop music from utter blandness.’
    • ‘There are noticeable exceptions to the general blandness of the extras.’
    • ‘It exudes the blandness of the Eisenhower era.’
    • ‘Perhaps the blandness of the human endeavors is purposeful.’
    • ‘The album's impact has been diminished by over-familiarity, by overexposure, by its very blandness.’
    • ‘This seemed pleasant enough at the time, but made no lasting impression other than blandness for me.’
    • ‘The movie is so afraid to offend anyone or anything that a fog of blandness hangs over the entire proceedings.’
    1. 1.1 (with reference to food or drink) the quality of being unseasoned, mild-tasting, or insipid.
      ‘the boneless chops were underseasoned to the point of blandness’
      • ‘The halibut is steamed into a kind of inert blandness, but the swordfish is a satisfying combination of gourmet flavor and heft.’
      • ‘The blandness of the port-and-chicken-liver mousse was redeemed by a sweet red-onion marmalade.’
      • ‘The tuna tartare leaves blandness behind with a kickoff of tomato-and-caper emulsion.’
      • ‘This technological approach has created a certain blandness and monotony in the wines.’
      • ‘This was a green curry of such blandness that had I tasted it blind I'd not have known what I was eating.’
      • ‘For those used to the blandness of tofu, tempeh's assertive flavor may come as a surprise.’
      • ‘Sometimes this kind of food can veer into blandness, but in the proper hands it's an education in primary flavors.’
      • ‘Perhaps the vivid hues are supposed to make up for the blandness of what gets served.’
      • ‘The buttery blandness of the usually overrated filet mignon gets surmounted by a brash pepper-splattered crust.’
      • ‘That such blandness should still predominate is all the more befuddling because the quality of the main ingredients is impeccable.’

Pronunciation

blandness

/ˈblandnəs/