Definition of blacklist in English:

blacklist

noun

  • A list of people or groups regarded as unacceptable or untrustworthy and often marked down for punishment or exclusion.

    • ‘We do make our blacklist publicly available so anyone can check if we are banning sites critical towards us.’
    • ‘If they list a URL in the comment that is on the blacklist, then they get blocked.’
    • ‘The browser adjusts its security settings automatically, based on a regularly-updated blacklist of dangerous or malicious sites.’
    • ‘I know what she means when she says that a blacklist will never be an effective, long-term solution to an internet-based problem.’
    • ‘A type of pattern-matching filter, Bayesian filters don't require whitelists or blacklists.’
    • ‘The infamous blacklist was already being compiled, and the subject matter of the movie could have made him suspect.’
    • ‘The new rules would allow the agency to create a blacklist of material deemed seriously dangerous to children.’
    • ‘They create blacklists and urge their readers and fellow bloggers to threaten and harass their targets.’
    • ‘It allows the attorney general to create a blacklist of organisations for their involvement in terrorism and allows the country to deport or bar entry to anyone connected with those groups.’
    • ‘The Popular Front period would fade into history, eclipsed by the war, the McCarthy period, the blacklist, the cold war.’
    • ‘The government is creating a force that will suppress the criminally influential, but many have escaped the blacklist whether through influence or virtue.’
    • ‘They've even published a blacklist of spamblogs to help indexing services weed them out.’
    • ‘Critics of the blacklist have set up a website highlighting their grievances against the popular service.’
    • ‘But thanks to the blacklist, hundreds of others are being tarred with the same brush, and thousands will be over the next few years.’
    • ‘The bank, which is on the US blacklist, has branches across the Middle East that continue to operate.’
    • ‘This is one of the books of the year, a lucid history of the Communist Party in Hollywood through the period of the blacklist.’
    • ‘As a result of the Liberal party's stance against the war, Canada finds itself, alongside many European states, on the blacklist of their most powerful ally.’
    • ‘Anti-spam systems also keep blacklists of known spammers, as well as lists of approved senders.’
    • ‘Inclusion on the blacklist, which could be proposed shortly, could make it difficult for the bank to do business internationally.’
    • ‘In the real world, however, there are no prematurely ended careers so far, no blacklists, no gulags for the dissidents.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Put (a person or group) on a blacklist.

    ‘workers were blacklisted after being quoted in the newspaper’
    ‘blacklisted books’
    • ‘Once the highest paid actor in Hollywood, he was blacklisted by the film industry and died penniless in 1943 at the age of 46.’
    • ‘Thousands of Americans were blacklisted during the Cold War.’
    • ‘Despite the fact that Arbuckle was later acquitted of manslaughter after two hung juries, he was essentially blacklisted from Hollywood.’
    • ‘As a result, the director was blacklisted in the French film industry for three years.’
    • ‘During the 1930s he was blacklisted as a union activist and never got work.’
    • ‘When Kevon told him the story, he blacklisted you and very nearly posted a price on your hide.’
    • ‘Originally a stage actor in France, he was blacklisted as a result of signing a statement against the French occupation of Algeria.’
    • ‘Those who refused to return to their teams were blacklisted from baseball.’
    • ‘Immigration has blacklisted him, which means he can never return to Thailand, citing that he was considered a danger to society.’
    • ‘He said million of poor workers and unemployed were blacklisted by credit bureaus even for owing a small amount of money.’
    • ‘When he was released, he was effectively blacklisted and unable to find work, forced to drive a taxi with a forged license.’
    • ‘If you're blacklisted, he says, you do what you can - just as if you were growing up in Harlem.’
    • ‘Factory owners regularly oblige overtime hours, pregnancy tests, dismiss and blacklist workers suspected of union organizing.’
    • ‘Well, I've blacklisted the sites and deleted the offending comments.’
    • ‘Last year we were blacklisted over copyright violation over a treaty that we signed.’
    • ‘I was blacklisted, pushed out, everybody who talked to me was humiliated.’
    • ‘I would not participate in a phoney election and accepted the alternative - being blacklisted and placed under surveillance.’
    • ‘Taking a serious note of the incident, the president blacklisted the Indian actor for his remarks.’
    • ‘He was blacklisted during the McCarthy years and subsequently suffered a severe nervous breakdown.’
    • ‘From that day on I was blacklisted by both him and the head elder.’
    boycott, ostracize, avoid, embargo, place an embargo on, put an embargo on, consider undesirable, steer clear of, ignore
    View synonyms

Pronunciation

blacklist

/ˈblaklɪst/