Definition of bipolarity in English:

bipolarity

noun

  • See bipolar

    • ‘In fact, terrorism has today become a counter pole to this order, imposing what is increasingly appearing to be a new bipolarity.’
    • ‘His only supporters are the old media (eastern newspapers and the three TV networks), determined to elect him despite his bipolarity.’
    • ‘The over-arching framework of bipolarity seemed to render other struggles and rivalries nothing more than local manifestations of the Cold War.’
    • ‘The war on terrorism has been marked by a strange cultural bipolarity; the hemisphere of policy is a place of relentless tragedy, while the hemisphere of culture and communication stays sane by walling off the other hemisphere.’
    • ‘Since the end of bipolarity and the mergence of a unipolar international system, I personally believe that nonalignment should be what characterises American foreign policy.’
    • ‘The end of bipolarity after 1989 led to the generalization of the western economic and social paradigm all over the world.’
    • ‘The bipolarity of the Cold War had gone, Russia should have been encouraged into the European structures and not structures like NATO built against it, and extended against it.’

Pronunciation

bipolarity

/bʌɪpəʊˈlarɪti/