Definition of bingo wings in English:

bingo wings

plural noun

British
informal
  • Folds of loose flesh or skin hanging from the undersides of a woman's upper arms.

    • ‘Lyn folds Steph up in her bingo wings and says 'Oh sweetheart, good heavens, what's happened?'’
    • ‘I thought turning grey would be my lot eventually, along with bingo wings and varicose veins.’
    • ‘In their place were perms and dyes, Michelin waists, plump upper arms (and, horror of horrors, the first stages of the dreaded 'bingo wings'), and 40-something, careworn faces.’
    • ‘The award for most catty remark went to Jackie, who said that a woman in the crowd had 'bingo wings'.’
    • ‘Devotees often sport 'bingo wings' - ill-advised displays of generous upper-arm flesh.’
    • ‘Work has to be done to get into bikini shape, lose those bingo wings, attain a flat stomach and so on.’
    • ‘And, more importantly, I don't want them to see me with a frizzy mop, crows feet and - although I haven't played the game for five years - bingo wings.’
    • ‘Then she got her gelatinous bingo wings in a twist.’
    • ‘She has decided that she's done with covering up her bingo wings, and wants them to be out and proud.’
    • ‘She's covered up her bingo wings with a sensible black suit.’
    • ‘Flabby underarm 'bingo wings', and bones clearly visible through a skinny frame came a close second and third.’
    • ‘Kiss goodbye to your bingo wings.’
    • ‘Still, you can't argue with a sport that uses 90% of your skeletal muscles, burns 20% more calories than normal walking and turns your bingo wings to iron.’
    • ‘These aren't just large arms, they're large arms with dry, scaly skin, with horrible armpits, with huge flabby bingo wings flapping about underneath the upper arms.’
    • ‘There aren't many women beyond their late 30's, in truth, who I can think of who don't have bingo wings.’

Origin

1990s: from an association with the game of bingo, in which the loose flesh may be visible when a winner calls out and raises their card.