Main definitions of bing in English

: bing1bing2

bing1

noun

Scottish
  • A heap, especially of metallic ore or of waste from a mine.

    • ‘It must be the worst place I have ever visited - especially the scenic bauxite bings.’
    • ‘Scottish Enterprise was involved in a land swap in the early days of developing the site, allowing Hill's company to acquire an ugly but strategically important coal bing for redevelopment while SE got a few acres of its own.’
    • ‘We may come from tenements and places with pit bings in them but we can storm any stage you want, the bigger the better.’
    • ‘In reality, most of Glenmorangie's employees work next to a huge shale bing near Broxburn, West Lothian.’
    • ‘There is an attractive new orchid known as Young's Helleborine found growing among the scrub on derelict pit bings.’
    • ‘Kenny Kemp found that for Andy Mooney, the shale bings of East Lothian were just a short hop from Disney courtesy of a pair of Air Jordans.’
    • ‘Today, 1pm The rangers of Chatelherault Country Park in South Lanarkshire lead a day of exploration inside a disused coal bing in search of signs of mining life, wildlife and plant life.’
    • ‘You can imagine Willie on top of a pit bing harranguing the men, so he's the hammer.’
    • ‘In 1966, when 146 people, mainly children, were killed after a pit bing collapsed in the mining village of Aberfan, she waited six days before visiting the scene.’
    pile, stack, mass, mound, mountain, quantity, load, lot, bundle, jumble
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 16th century: from Old Norse bingr heap.

Pronunciation:

bing

/bɪŋ/

Main definitions of bing in English

: bing1bing2

bing2

exclamation

  • Indicating a sudden action or event:

    ‘then, bing, the lights went on’
    • ‘And so we have something that's almost like automatic speaking, speaking in tongues, connected - bing!’
    • ‘Sometimes it'll be something really exciting and bing, it's gone!’
    • ‘It usually accumulates into a popping sound - and when that happens - bing, you're astral baby.’
    • ‘Then bing bang boom it hit every one of the myro's that was near us.’
    • ‘He may not hit you bing, bing, bing, but sometimes that run comes in the fourth quarter.’
    • ‘They just rehearsed it with the orchestra, bing, went out, put the cameras on, gone.’
    • ‘Even for the tiniest items… bing, out comes the plastic.’
    • ‘Then do periodic searches on that filename, find everyone who has it, download it, and bing another law broken.’
    • ‘Something happens to him - bing - this other guy's the president.’

Origin

Late 19th century: (originally dialect in the sense ‘sudden bang’): imitative.

Pronunciation:

bing

/bɪŋ/