Definition of binding in English:



  • 1A strong covering holding the pages of a book together.

    • ‘In that room you breathed books, that musty paper odor of yellowing pages and crumbling bindings.’
    • ‘The usual smell of books and bindings met my nose, which crinkled momentarily.’
    • ‘His fingers finding the binding of the book he slid it out carefully, but then when it was not what he was looking for he forced the book back into place with a little anger in his fingertips.’
    • ‘He ran his index finger along the book bindings lightly.’
    • ‘Instead the backs of the glass-fronted book cases have been painted a rich red, reminiscent of a colour often used in old book bindings.’
    • ‘The book had a brown binding, spine nearly stripped of color, pages sticking out from the sides.’
    • ‘Down the hall, bulky letterpresses stand ready to fold these words into sheets; in another room, the pages are sewn into bindings.’
    • ‘She carelessly lifted the ‘Destination Guide’ book and tossed it across the room, half the pages torn from the binding.’
    • ‘They're making boxes for the storage of fragile text, and in some cases creating new, if somewhat rudimentary bindings for old books.’
    • ‘There was a tiny squeak from in front of Francis' desk, and after a moment, a small white mouse climbed up the bindings of books in a pile and sat on top in plain view of its friend.’
    • ‘What's the problem with paperback book bindings these days?’
    • ‘Once text is digital, books seep out of their bindings and weave themselves together.’
    • ‘A beautiful book with perfect bindings and 5 star ratings?’
    • ‘You may need to repair the spine and actual page bindings in order to install a new cover.’
    • ‘On the coffee table, on the bookshelves in between books with worn bindings, were framed photographs of Phil and Karen.’
    • ‘The books themselves were dirty and well worn; their bindings held together by moth-eaten reddish cloth.’
    • ‘He said that regular cleaning had been carried out, but that it had a down side in that damage could be caused to fragile books and bindings.’
    • ‘Essential requirements: a strong binding, and a size small enough so I can carry the sketchbook everywhere I go without being conscious of it till I need it.’
    • ‘As always, the scent of musty pages and old bindings, mixed with the aroma of coffee, washed over me, and I stopped for a second to breathe it in.’
    • ‘He placed them onto his small desk in the front as I caressed their bindings and pages.’
    1. 1.1[mass noun]Fabric cut or woven in a strip, used for binding the edges of a piece of material.
      • ‘When ever possible the combination of glue and a screw, nail or staple, a glue and a joint, a glue and stitching or binding, will guarantee a successful bond.’
      • ‘Make ties from ribbon or from leftover fabric or binding.’
      • ‘For a fine finish on short-haired furs, finish the raw edge with seam binding and secure the hem with double catch-stitching as noted above.’
      • ‘She named it for the journalistic quote mentioned above, using red thread to quilt it and a red and black binding.’
      • ‘It was sparingly used to begin with, since precious woven stuff is wasted by this technique, and curved cut edges demand added binding or facing to stop the raw thread-ends from fraying.’
      • ‘I repeated the same binding technique on the edges of two slash pockets.’
      • ‘If you want a more deconstructed look rather than girly, trim off the ruffle hem binding of a tulle slip and the result will be more edgy than prom queen.’
      • ‘The women's version, in sizes S - 2XL, is an ottoman knit tee with solid binding along the scoop neck opening.’
      • ‘Sew the medium blue binding strips together at the short ends.’
      • ‘I was just not sure which one I wanted to put money into, and then it hit me, my hand was hurting from hand sewing binding on the formerly cut with scissors strip quilted placemats!’
      • ‘The seams and taut binding of the corset brought a sensual awareness to the nerve endings of each long finger.’
      • ‘If the binding around the edge is glued on, don't rub it or let it get very wet.’
      cord, cording, braiding, bullion, thread, twine, yarn, tape, binding, rickrack, ribbon
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  • 2Skiing
    A mechanical device fixed to a ski to grip a ski boot, especially either of a pair used for downhill skiing which hold the toe and heel of the boot and release it automatically in a fall.

    • ‘But hey, I can mount a pair of rando bindings in an hour, so why not give them a whirl?’
    • ‘The recipe is simple but tasty: add an ice skating blade with a clip-in ski binding to a skate-ski boot.’
    • ‘Remove the skins, lock heels into their bindings and go for it.’
    • ‘Time tested and reliable Dynafit TLT ski binding in touring mode with heel lift, brake installed and retracted for touring.’
    • ‘Ascending a mountain on skis requires bindings with a heel release, and ‘skins’ made of mohair or nylon which let the skis glide, turn uphill and grip the snow.’
    • ‘On March 19, 2003, Dynafit announced that they were bagging the Tri-Step ski binding.’
    • ‘The Mountain, Sherpa's top-of-the-line model, is improved this year with a new, one-piece, step-in binding.’
    • ‘The Alpine Trekker is simply a dummy ski-boot sole that you clip into your alpine ski binding.’
    • ‘True durability evaluation of a ski binding takes several seasons of consumer distribution.’
    • ‘With the possibility of inconsistent release that many touring bindings have, this could be important.’
    • ‘Some clip into the pedal (sort of like a ski binding which attaches the rider to the bike) and others look like traditional shoes with firm sole.’
    • ‘The biggest concern is that the safety release of AT bindings is not designed to protect ankles in soft boots.’
    • ‘Alpine ski binding release was significantly less likely to occur in accidents involving FDP.’
    • ‘The company's CEO then made the mystical decision that the ski industry really needed a ski binding built to the same specs.’
    • ‘Since then the company has led the market with new developments such as shifters built into brake levers and pedals that riders can click into like a ski binding.’
    • ‘Adjusting Naxo bindings for different boot sizes and release settings is easy.’
    • ‘The first engagement is adapted to mate with the second engagement member to engage the snowboard boot to the binding.’
    • ‘We all use machinery, whether it be a bolt drill, knee joint, ski binding, or snowmobile.’
    • ‘In downhill skiing, your whole foot is secured in a binding on the ski; in cross-country, your heel is free, making it easier to glide along the flats and uphill.’
    • ‘By now you should have your boot in your binding, looking something like this.’
  • 3[mass noun] The action of fastening or holding together, or of being linked by chemical bonds.

    ‘the binding of antibodies to cell surfaces’
    • ‘Formation of these structures involves binding of a third DNA strand into the major groove of a DNA double helix.’
    • ‘It has long been known that reversible binding can alter the apparent kinetics of a chemical reaction.’
    • ‘There is no endogenous peroxidase activity or nonspecific binding of the secondary antibody in the paraffin-embedded sections.’
    • ‘Subsequent binding of the regulatory protein arrestin follows this phosphorylation.’
    • ‘The technique gives results similar to other techniques used to study binding of peptide to membrane.’
    • ‘The binding of a DNA molecule to freshly cleaved mica surface in solution has also been measured.’
    • ‘The binding of peptides to lipid bilayers is a subject of great interest, from both a biomedical and biophysical standpoint.’
    • ‘Therefore, in our analysis, the effects of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis were not included.’
    • ‘A better understanding is needed of how chemical form affects binding of trace elements to absorption antagonists.’
    • ‘Our study is the first demonstration that ligand binding can strengthen a protein against mechanical stress.’
    • ‘Such multi-site binding would explain the double mechanism for the actin filament length regulation.’
    • ‘The second type of residue involved in ligand binding are aromatic residues.’
    • ‘Therefore we can conclude that binding of the protein causes the formation of these bends.’
    • ‘The second step involves binding of phospholipid molecules in the active site of the adsorbed enzyme.’
    • ‘RNA polymerase binding may be inhibited by the distorted promoter structure.’
    • ‘We now know that these particular antibodies are rather weakly binding and only poorly specific.’
    • ‘It is worth reiterating that we do not take exception to two-step binding of myosin to actin.’
    • ‘Thus, the change in conformation was caused by binding of the peptide to the Teflon surface.’
    • ‘It remains to be shown that W512 is uniquely sensitive to nucleotide binding and hydrolysis in smooth muscle myosin.’
    • ‘Chemical binding may be required for certain burns.’
    1. 3.1(in Chomskyan linguistics) the relationship between a referentially dependent noun (such as a reflexive) and the independent noun phrase which determines its reference.
      • ‘This has the consequence that the readings dependent on the long-distance binding of the reflexives are incorrectly ruled out.’
      • ‘Anaphoric binding relations are conditioned by a number of different factors, one of which is the verb, which may be marked for reflexivisation and may determine the binding domain of reflexives and pronouns which occur within its nucleus.’
      • ‘Semantic intransitives then, are one-place predicates including the ones that are 'derived' from two-place predicates by variable binding.’
      • ‘It is easy to design a binding theory that predicts non-complementary distribution in specific circumstances.’
      • ‘Adopting the definition of binding domain of Chomsky (1986), it is clear that the subject is in the local domain of the anaphor.’


  • (of an agreement or promise) involving an obligation that cannot be broken.

    ‘business agreements are intended to be legally binding’
    • ‘Following 18 months of peace negotiations a tiny flicker of hope has emerged promising a binding agreement to restore order.’
    • ‘This seems to me to be inconsistent with a contention that a binding agreement for a joint venture survived.’
    • ‘A conservation easement is a formal and legally binding agreement that allows the landowner to maintain ownership and use of the land while protecting its natural values indefinitely.’
    • ‘NGOs have pledged to renew their campaign for such a binding agreement at the World Trade Organization meeting next year.’
    • ‘All proteges and all mentors are required to articulate individual expectations and goals through a process of open dialogue that results in this binding agreement.’
    • ‘Cllr Hawksby admitted that the council is contractually bound having signed a binding agreement with Hyder.’
    • ‘Over the course of the next several months, Kerzner will enter into negotiations of binding agreements for both of these projects.’
    • ‘Surveying girls' interests, planning for expansion or making binding promises to launch programs can meet this requirement.’
    • ‘Nash divided game theory into two parts, cooperative games, in which binding agreements can be made, and non-cooperative games, where binding agreements are not possible.’
    • ‘If he had not have interfered with the findings then they would have supported the conclusion that there was a binding agreement as a result of the Adelaide meeting.’
    • ‘Unless all the material terms of the proposed contract are agreed, there is no binding agreement.’
    • ‘The Justice and Electoral Committee said that we should have such an inquiry, but the committee is unable to make binding promises for the next term of Parliament.’
    • ‘Although Irish Ferries will be allowed to register its vessels in Cyprus, it has committed to a binding agreement under Irish law to maintain the above standards for three years.’
    • ‘According to specialists in labor law, a signed contract is a binding agreement.’
    • ‘He talked about his opinion that the Statement of Reconciliation was meaningless without a hard and binding promise from the government that it would change its approach to Indian Affairs.’
    • ‘To enquire about a price is to enter into a binding agreement: the stall-holder will keep knocking the price until he or she arrives at a tariff agreeable to you.’
    • ‘We had been separated from the rest of humanity with solemn and legally binding promises to keep mum.’
    • ‘Unlike the USAir website, there is not need to affirmatively indicate your assent before purporting to enter into a binding agreement.’
    • ‘Perkel ended up calling the sales department instead, where a representative informed him that the license was not, in fact, a binding agreement.’
    • ‘The panel would be expected to negotiate a binding agreement within six months of a successful referendum.’
    irrevocable, unalterable, unbreakable, indissoluble, permanent
    compulsory, obligatory, imperative, mandatory, necessary
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