Definition of bimbo in English:

bimbo

noun

derogatory, informal
  • An attractive but unintelligent or frivolous young woman.

    • ‘While insulting them, she is telling about her pursuit of her 18-year-old son, Chester, who has ripped her off and gone for a luxury weekend in Rio with two bimbos.’
    • ‘It was wall-to-wall bimbos and their aspiring bimbos.’
    • ‘She is incredibly attractive but she's not a bimbo, and that's what makes her so special.’
    • ‘I responded with something along the lines of; ‘Maybe girls in America are expected to look like bimbos at a young age, but not in England, thank you very much!’’
    • ‘One of the least funny characters is George's dimwitted bimbo secretary, Princess, who is of course a mimic of countless unfunny bimbos in sitcoms past.’
    • ‘There are an unending parade of zaftig, high-chested, round-bottomed babes and bimbos parading in short-shorts and tight tee-shirts all around the track and pit areas.’
    • ‘Inspired by the alarming numbers of mindless bimbos at my school who have begun wearing yellow ribbons in support of Schapelle ‘I didn't do it!’’
    • ‘The condition is not taken seriously because the men who suffer from it - warning signs: bikes, bimbos and Beckhamesque earrings - are viewed by their peers as silly fools.’
    • ‘A Slovenian TV programme that tried to prove top models were brainless bimbos was scrapped after an ex-Miss Universe turned out to have a higher IQ than a nuclear physicist.’
    • ‘I think that women are often accused of being silly and bimbos and forgetful, but most of us know that this is the best economy we have seen in 40 or 50 years.’
    • ‘In fact, the women in Sea aren't bimbos, but characters representing different, complex responses to the dilemma, and they are balanced against male characters with equally strong or confused views.’
    • ‘The once ridiculed arranged marriage is now a rating show with presumptuous hunks and vapid bimbos on television parading as the bachelors and batchelorettes.’
    • ‘Like Maxim, with its lame-oid tour of silicon bimbos coming to our very special town, international Smirnoff is looking to grab more of the market, any way it can.’
    • ‘Some of the characters, such as spoilt Premiership stars, shifty agents and publicity-mad bimbos, are instantly identifiable with true-life equivalents and not altogether far-fetched.’
    • ‘No one can remember anything about it except the bimbos, the lies and the felonies, ‘she says.’’
    • ‘The aging girls were ditched in the eighties, but the legacy of bad choreography continues, with anonymous bimbos who stand on raised podiums, shaking their bits to the hits.’
    • ‘Contrary to what many believe, student-athletes on the football team are not the bunch of muscle-bound, barbaric bimbos that we are so often perceived to be.’
    • ‘In many games on the market today, women are portrayed as empty-headed bimbos that need saving, all the while wearing little more than a handkerchief.’
    • ‘This is not merely a result of typecasting, as when Melanie Griffith plays bimbos, or when Sean Connery plays gruff, adventurous old codgers.’
    • ‘It is possible to see good in our ability to refuse to be stereotyped, but in a way, that black-and-white innocent age, when women were either bimbos or bluestockings, was kinder.’

Origin

Early 20th century (originally in the sense ‘fellow, chap’): from Italian, literally ‘little child’.

Pronunciation

bimbo

/ˈbɪmbəʊ/