Definition of bilocation in English:

bilocation

noun

  • [mass noun] The supposed phenomenon of being in two places simultaneously.

    • ‘Two examples are the dramatic cases of bilocation of French Mother Yvonne-Aimee and the lay Italian mystic Natuzza Evolo, generally ignored by students of OBEs and apparitions.’
    • ‘We may be wrong, but we thought that most voters managed to juggle the difficult task of working and voting without bilocation.’
    • ‘His followers endow him with supernatural gifts, like bilocation - the ability to be in two places at once - predicting the future and healing the sick.’
    • ‘His supernatural status was confirmed by a golden thigh, the gift of bilocation, and the capacity to recall his previous incarnations.’
    • ‘His gifts were perfume, bilocation, prophecy, conversion, reading of the souls, spiritual healing, and miraculous cures.’
    • ‘Padre Pio, with his legendary feats of bilocation, mind-reading (or more properly, soul reading) levitation and stigmata, is the sort of Catholic saint even the Vatican once considered embarrassing.’
    • ‘When I was about 12, I had an experience, a vision, a bilocation experience I remember very vividly to this day.’
    • ‘McDowell must have the gift of bilocation, because he appeared at the door of another Last Post spy in Ranelagh that night between 9pm and 10 pm canvassing.’
    • ‘The loss of the skiing gave us an unexpectedly long look at the kids from a junior skating Grand Prix, which gave us a chance to revel not only in Barry Davies's versatility, but also his gift of bilocation.’
    • ‘Which reminds me: in Amadora, in lovely Portugal, they are having a career retrospective for me, which I wish I could have been at (as soon as I master the whole bilocation bit, I'll start turning up at a lot more places).’
    • ‘His most famous miracles include bilocation, his rendering harmless of poisoned food by making the sign of the cross and his sermon to the fishes on the bank of the river Brenta near Padua.’
    • ‘It corresponds in this sense to the clinical condition of autoscopy: the relatively rare cases of psychological bilocation where individuals see themselves in another body.’
    • ‘The video of this final could be on coaching courses. • There are times then the GAA public is ‘spoiled’ for choice, yet would wish the gift of bilocation.’
    • ‘Unless GAA players manage to crack bilocation, the inter-county dual star is on the wane.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, Therese of Liseiux lived a live that was, by all external measures, boring and rather uneventful with no displays of bilocation, miracles, or bells and whistles.’

Pronunciation:

bilocation

/ˌbʌɪlə(ʊ)ˈkeɪʃ(ə)n/