Definition of bight in English:

bight

noun

  • 1A curve or recess in a coastline, river, or other geographical feature.

    • ‘Leaf headed his boat around to the small bight where the large power boat was tied, manoeuvred up to her and rafted alongside.’
    • ‘It's a blustery day on Humble Island, a tiny speck of rock tucked into a bight on the south end of Anvers Island, Antarctica.’
    • ‘Most of ours live aboard vessels moored more or less permanently outside the marina breakwater, in a shallow bight known as Fools' Anchorage.’
    • ‘Couldn't see the mountains but Lake Taupo and the Taranaki bight were visible.’
    • ‘Worth waiting for, though: The offshore waters are typically tempestuous, but winds in the channel's eastern bight will be only 10 to 15 knots.’
    • ‘The southern California bight region, Baja peninsula and waters offshore of central California are emerging as major regions of bluefin tuna residency.’
    • ‘Days after the accident, ABP issued a notice to pilots telling them they should avoid passing in bights - areas where rivers curve - and emphasising they should always clearly communicate their intentions to the pilots of other ships.’
    • ‘The oceans were reduced two in number; the larger by far was the enormous Panthalassa Ocean, roughly equivalent to the Pacific of today, while the smaller Tethys Ocean lay as a gigantic bight on the eastern side of Pangaea.’
    • ‘Convergence of shelf water flows from the Middle and South Atlantic Bights (MAB and SAB) upon Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, presents a potential barrier to the exchange of fish larvae between bights.’
    • ‘We round the bight and suddenly the cacophony ceases.’
    cove, inlet, estuary, indentation, natural harbour, gulf, basin, fjord, ria, sound, arm, firth, anchorage
    View synonyms
  • 2A loop of rope.

    • ‘Pete finally settled on an arrangement that he was happy with, consisting of a butterfly and a long loop leading to a bowline on the bight.’
    • ‘Then pull a bight of the top rope trough the initial loop, and continue to the end of the sling/cordelette.’
    • ‘He also learned the trick of using improvised wire strainers - a lever stuck into a stapled bight of wire.’
    • ‘Personnel conducting any evolution that involves the use of ropes need to be aware of where they are standing at all times and avoid stepping into bights.’
    • ‘They were positioned to the port side of the nose at our ten o'clock, in order to remain clear of the 3-wire's bight on the retract.’

Origin

Old English byht ‘a bend or angle’, of Germanic origin; related to bow.

Pronunciation

bight

/bʌɪt/