Definition of Big Stoush in English:

Big Stoush

noun

the Big Stoush
Australian
informal
  • The First World War.

    ‘I was one of those individuals deemed unfit for active service during the Big Stoush’
    • ‘I cut timber down there for a couple of years, after the Big Stoush.’
    • ‘When I was a young man, we sent men to South Africa, and when the Big Stoush came on in 1914, we went right into it.’
    • ‘His mate joins the army to fight in the Big Stoush and dies at Gallipoli.’
    • ‘It is pretty miserable having to go home without hearing a shot fired when I tried so hard to get into the Big Stoush.’
    • ‘She was born into a society marked by returned soldiers back in civvies, trying to reconstruct the lives they had before the Big Stoush.’
    • ‘He used to sit in that corner, write a bit of poetry, then stagger up to the Bulletin and sell it for five bob—just after the Big Stoush, that was.’
    • ‘His old man, like so many others, had not long been back from five years in the Big Stoush and had his own demons to fight.’
    • ‘It had gone into the Big Stoush as the 'little boy' amongst the nations and had come out with a bit of a swagger.’
    • ‘The Australian diggers knew the Great War of 1914–1918 as the Big Stoush.’
    • ‘The Big Stoush was the war, and a stunt was a battle—these were the verbal ways of avoiding a grim reality.’