Definition of big crunch in English:

big crunch

noun

Astronomy
  • A contraction of the universe to a state of extremely high density and temperature (a hypothetical opposite of the big bang).

    • ‘The idea at that time was a cycle in which our three-dimensional universe goes through periods of expansion beginning from the Big Bang and then reversal to contraction and a big crunch.’
    • ‘He describes how the universe might die a heat death, and also argues that it may be possible that a big crunch will occur instead.’
    • ‘It is as certain as can be that the whole universe will end either in the dying whisper of unending expansion and ever increasing cold, or in the fiery bang of a collapse into the cosmic melting pot of the big crunch.’
    • ‘As the late Professor Beatrice Tinsley of Yale explained, even though the mathematics says that the universe oscillates, ‘There is no known physical mechanism to reverse a catastrophic big crunch.’’
    • ‘The dark energy might (as far as we know) decay after a while to a negative value, creating an inward acceleration that leads to a big crunch before things get so dull.’
    • ‘So there's no evidence at all that the expansion will stop and turn around and go to a big crunch.’
    • ‘Since time itself began when the cosmos was created there may be little point in asking what happened before, but rather what will be the final fate of the universe - will it expand forever or end in a big crunch?’
    • ‘As a result, 100 billion years after the Big Bang will come the big crunch.’
    • ‘Now cosmologists generally regard the universe as being in a phase of expansion, a phase that will reverse as the energies run down and lead to what has been described as the big crunch.’
    • ‘Some theorists speculate that the universe will end in a big crunch, when everything collapses in on itself.’
    • ‘If, as he has said, the universe was created with a big bang, it may end with a big crunch, when all the galaxies crash together.’
    • ‘‘Until now we thought the Universe would either re-collapse to a big crunch or expand forever to a state of infinite dilution,’ says Robert Caldwell of Dartmouth College, New Hampshire.’
    • ‘The big bang should leave a boring, featureless universe, but not if it was preceded by a big crunch.’
    • ‘Furthermore the big bang and the big crunch are actually the same event, just viewed from different directions.’
    • ‘If the universe is closed (with the amount of matter more than a critical density), the expansion of the universe will eventually stop and then reverse to begin a contraction leading to an eventual collapse termed the big crunch.’