Main definitions of bid in English

: bid1bid2

bid1

verb

  • 1[with object] Offer (a certain price) for something, especially at an auction.

    ‘a consortium of dealers bid a world record price for a snuff box’
    [no object] ‘guests will bid for pieces of fine jewellery’
    • ‘You can keep an eye on everything you are bidding on by visiting your members area and selecting the "bidding" page.’
    • ‘The disclosed reserve means that the property has to be sold on the day as soon as the asking price is bid, but it could still go for much more than that amount.’
    • ‘After all, if 75% of buyers get the first house they bid for, who were they bidding against?’
    • ‘This will give you the chance to look into potential members before they can bid on your item.’
    • ‘What is there to prevent free riders from bidding the price up excessively high, as they've done in other countries?’
    • ‘You need to be logged in before you can bid on this item.’
    • ‘You can bid on a maximum of three properties in any one bidding cycle.’
    • ‘That will help you make sure that you're bidding a price that isn't too rich or too low.’
    • ‘The plaintiff said she was ‘devastated’ at the low price being bid by the purchaser.’
    • ‘Eventually, they got someone to bid a reasonable price for the cake and we all managed to get a slice.’
    • ‘At other sites, the seller is entitled to the prices bid by each of the highest bidders.’
    • ‘When he saw the six-month-old filly fresh off the range at a government auction, he bid a record $19,000 for her.’
    • ‘Buyers can bid on 5 types of auctions. The process is very simple and quick.’
    • ‘Firstly, wait until all the items you are bidding on have ended.’
    • ‘Sellers can also choose which users can bid on their auctions according to the bidder's feedback score.’
    • ‘Hence, it is no surprise few investors were willing to bid a high price for the bank.’
    • ‘Ebay is an online auction site where people can list items for sale and people can bid on them, the highest bidder wins the auction.’
    • ‘Carefully review the item that you are bidding on and how much you have agreed to pay for it, then click on the "Place Bid" button to finalize your bid.’
    • ‘They are bidding the prices up and up because they know how great the future is looking under the policies that are at present in place.’
    • ‘Please remember to state which lot you are bidding on, and include your email address, address and phone number.’
    offer, make an offer of, put in a bid of, put up, tender, proffer, propose, submit, put forward, advance
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[no object](of a contractor) offer to do (work) for a stated price; tender for.
      ‘nineteen companies have indicated their intention to bid for the contract’
      • ‘A number of companies are bidding for the demolition and construction contracts.’
      • ‘They and the council plan to use their base in Westminster to bid for contracts in other councils.’
      • ‘The distribution company successfully bid for the contract after tenders were invited.’
      • ‘We agreed minimum levels when we bid for the contract to keep the prison within the public sector.’
      • ‘Her measure prevents offshore companies from bidding for government contracts.’
      • ‘He is an architect who is bidding for a contract with an oleaginous millionaire.’
      • ‘Companies with impeccable environmental credentials can be barred from even bidding for contracts, it reveals.’
      • ‘But a number of the rivals bidding for the contract have now warned that they are unconvinced by the declaration.’
      • ‘The multinational bids for contracts anywhere and everywhere in the world.’
      • ‘This private venture bids for a contract being let by the state.’
      • ‘They want to use the privatised services in Westminster as a base to bid for contracts in other councils.’
      • ‘These will be used as criteria for choosing proposals from companies bidding for the contract to renovate.’
      • ‘Contractors bidding for work must certify that no work will be performed out of the country.’
      • ‘As a result, we expect operators to be less enthusiastic about bidding for all that's on offer.’
      • ‘It is bidding for multi-billion dollar contracts for reconstruction work in Iraq.’
      • ‘In the meantime, one of the companies bidding for the contract has pulled out.’
    2. 1.2Bridge
      Make a statement during the auction undertaking to make (a certain number of tricks with a stated suit as trumps) if the bid is successful and one becomes the declarer.
      ‘North bids four hearts’
      • ‘In subsequent deals, if no one bids the trump suit remains unchanged form the previous deal.’
      • ‘If the partner who bid nil wins even a single trick, his or her team loses 10 points.’
      • ‘Now each player bids a number of tricks, and you play and score according to the same rules as for three or four players.’
      • ‘Players can bid any number of tricks - the bids may or may not add up to the total tricks available.’
      • ‘If a player who has at least one point bids four and makes it, that player immediately wins the whole game.’
  • 2[no object] Make an effort or attempt to achieve.

    [with infinitive] ‘she's now bidding to become a top female model’
    ‘the two forwards are bidding for places in the England side’
    • ‘The new Lancashire captain will turn to his predecessor for help as he bids to lead the club back to the County Championship's top flight at the first attempt.’
    • ‘The two-year-old goes for the £10,000 race over six furlongs and will have David in the saddle as he bids to extend his winning sequence.’
    • ‘The local favourite will have a brand new supporter to cheer him along for the very first time as he bids to defend his title this Sunday.’
    • ‘Just how good the horse might prove to be is hard to know at present, this being his first season of racing, but the three-year-old has impressive credentials as he bids to hit the jackpot tomorrow.’
    • ‘He will have conditions in his favour as he bids to go one better than his recent second-placed effort at Beverley and notch his first win of the campaign.’
    • ‘Julia will be bidding for a record ninth women's singles title, while her team mates will be bidding to retain their titles.’
    • ‘The popular showman bids to break his duck at the ninth attempt on Saturday on the top rated juvenile of last season.’
    • ‘Neil, a regular at the Superbowl, is bidding to beat the 50-hour mark.’
    • ‘The weekly listings publication does not mind admitting that it will be a little cheekier too, as it bids to inject more fun into the life of one of Europe's increasingly popular destinations.’
    • ‘The German supermarket chain, who claim to be the biggest in Europe, now use near half page adverts totally in German as it bids to attract new German speaking employees.’
    • ‘The Chamber of Commerce says the city should model itself on major European centres such as Barcelona, Madrid, Milan and Berlin as it bids to climb into the top tier of Britain's cities.’
    • ‘He tries out Wolverhampton's newly-refurbished all-weather course tomorrow as he bids to complete a quick double.’
    • ‘The solicitor said he was bidding to contact Brians brother in Britain in an effort to raise bail.’
    • ‘The speedster enters perhaps the most important weekend of his career tomorrow as he bids to take the British Touring Car Championship title.’
    • ‘The horse with a huge reputation, puts his prowess on the line at Newmarket tomorrow as he bids to confirm his place in next month's race.’
    • ‘The England rider will be defending the world title he won in Australia, as he bids to become the first rider in cycle speedway history to win three world titles.’
    • ‘Alcoholic drinks bought in off licences are to be traceable as the Government bids to clampdown on underage drinking, and drunken, disorderly behaviour.’
    try to obtain, try to get, make a pitch for, make a bid for
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1An offer of a price, especially at an auction.

    ‘at the fur tables, several buyers make bids for the pelts’
    • ‘If the property remains unsold after the auction i.e. your bid was below the reserve price, speak to the auctioneer to register your interest before leaving the saleroom.’
    • ‘When putting an item up for auction, set the minimum bid at the lowest fair price you're willing to accept.’
    • ‘The raft has so far attracted 54 bids and the price has reached $15,099.99 with one week of bidding remaining.’
    • ‘Prospective car owners can enter their bids through an online auction system that is conducted every month, over a three-day period.’
    • ‘The final minutes are the ones to concentrate on, since everybody is fighting to make theirs the final bid of the auction.’
    • ‘The Internet auction system will automatically submit bids in increments one higher than the current price.’
    • ‘It will be put up for auction and a bid of £500 has already been received.’
    • ‘But his country mansion was withdrawn from auction even though it attracted a bid of €900,000, the same as the guide price.’
    • ‘The works are up for bids until the auction closes on May 25.’
    • ‘It was close to the end of its auction and had no bids on a low starting price.’
    • ‘It can be a live auction, with bids published for everyone in real time.’
    • ‘As the auction progresses and the bids are raised, it can be easy to get carried away and go a little over - so be strict and withdraw once it passes your threshold.’
    • ‘One punter, however, is trying to sell a city centre room on an Internet auction site with bids starting at £60.’
    • ‘The auction starts with a high price, which is lowered until somebody offers an acceptable bid.’
    • ‘If a buyer accepts the bid, the shop is notified via e-mail and the collaborative process continues.’
    • ‘Within days it became clear word had spread about the auction and several generous bids flooded in, spiralling up to £1m at one point.’
    • ‘A couple of local lads went to that auction and a bid was made.’
    • ‘Primary dealers are allowed to place up to 30 competitive bids at the auction.’
    • ‘When one of his paintings failed to attract even a single bid at an auction in 1990, the audience broke into spontaneous applause.’
    • ‘Unsurprisingly, the auction ended with no bids.’
    offer, tender, proposal, submission
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1An offer to buy the shares of a company in order to gain control of it.
      [as modifier] ‘a takeover bid’
      • ‘If yesterday's purchase of shares is the precursor to a takeover bid, those qualities will make them formidable opponents for the Manchester United board.’
      • ‘Days later the company announced a takeover bid and Archer sold the shares at a profit of £77,000.’
      • ‘Since the takeover bid started the loss on any given day has varied from close to €1 to €1.30.’
      • ‘The takeover bid was conditional on his getting a 51 percent control.’
      • ‘The bid has gained considerable momentum since it was declared last August.’
      • ‘The world's biggest airports operator rejected the transport company's 810p a share bid on Friday, saying it undervalued the firm.’
      • ‘Analysts believe a bid of 350p a share would be fair value.’
      • ‘The coach company has all but abandoned a bid to take control of Scottish railway tracks because it claims the paperwork on upkeep and ownership is missing or out of date.’
      • ‘With so much cash on hand, the company would be vulnerable to a takeover bid if the family didn't control so much stock.’
      • ‘With a stake of 6.3 per cent, he may not have quite enough shares to block the bid.’
      • ‘Its share bid is based upon the Government not being there.’
      • ‘Sixty-four percent of shareholders, accounting for 94% of shares, backed the takeover bid.’
      • ‘The company was worth an estimated $15.81 per share when the bid was formally tabled in early July.’
      • ‘Reports that a mystery bidder was looking to mount a takeover bid has pushed the shares to over 160p - their highest in a year.’
      • ‘Shares in the club reached a three-year high after the stake was snapped up yesterday for more than £30m, leading to talk of a takeover bid.’
      • ‘But even without the attraction of a bid, Egg shares should be on your investing menu.’
      • ‘They are being quietly overpowered as the physical market gains strength and competing bids rise.’
      • ‘The two have repeatedly denied they are planning a takeover bid and said they see United as undervalued, representing a good long-term investment.’
      • ‘When the store turned in disappointing fourth-quarter results in April and shares fell, a bid seemed likely.’
      • ‘If the bid succeeds, his control of the newspaper market on the island of Ireland would be close to monopolistic.’
    2. 1.2An offer to do work or supply goods at a stated price; a tender.
      ‘a number of businessmen were keen to make a bid for the £75 million contract’
      • ‘The latest consortium was thought to have included leading figures from the business community, but the president said no bid had been tendered.’
      • ‘He added that the matter should be considered again once the amount and nature of bids was known.’
      • ‘Although eight companies had bought the tender documentation, none submitted a bid.’
      • ‘The museum must submit its bid by April 2 as part of a sealed tender process for the historic engine's sale.’
      • ‘Buyers will not be able to just do anything they want with their new refuge - the city must approve development plans before bids can even be tendered.’
      • ‘A total of 161 developers failed in the tenders because their bids exceeded the upper limits.’
      • ‘‘We received eight bids yesterday after we opened the tender box and we will select the successful one,’ she said.’
      • ‘How are you planning to go about inviting bids from concessionaires for commercial activities like cargo and fuel supply?’
      • ‘The amount of the bids of course was not known at the time of the treasurer's decision a week before opening the tenders but they indicate the fundamental problem presented by these facts.’
      • ‘It attracted eight bidders at the tender stage and received bids from owner-occupiers, investors and developers.’
      • ‘The building is currently up for sale and tendering is open for bids.’
      • ‘In mid-December, the court ordered all four bidders in the original tender to submit improved bids.’
      • ‘‘Hence the company does not comply with the explicit tender requirements for the bids that it won,’ he said.’
      • ‘We have already floated tenders inviting bid proposals and the bids will be opened in November.’
      • ‘The amounts of the losing bids were not disclosed.’
      • ‘From those, four submitted detailed bids before the tender deadline on Friday.’
      • ‘It is understood, however, that interest was solid and that several bids had been tendered by the time the offer period closed yesterday.’
      • ‘For example, it is common to exclude second bids or negotiation after submission of a bid; or to publish the results of the bids and supply feedback to unsuccessful bidders.’
      • ‘They determined prices and decided amongst themselves who would submit the lowest tender bid to install fire sprinklers.’
      • ‘To comply, the Housing Department decided to reject any tender bid should the monthly wages of subcontracted workers be less than the market value.’
    3. 1.3Bridge
      An undertaking by a player in the auction to make a stated number of tricks with a stated suit as trumps.
      ‘a bid of three spades’
      • ‘After nine tricks the play ends, and the three remaining cards held by each player determine their bids.’
      • ‘A bid can only be overcalled by calling a lower card of the same suit as the original bid.’
      • ‘The declarer and his partner do not score any points if they do not take at least the number of tricks that the declarer bid.’
      • ‘A bid of no tricks is a pass, and if all players pass, the hand is redealt by the same dealer.’
      • ‘There is great variety in the special bids or actions a player may be allowed to make during his turn to bid.’
  • 2An attempt or effort to achieve something.

    ‘he made a bid for power in 1984’
    [with infinitive] ‘an investigation would be carried out in a bid to establish what had happened’
    • ‘In a bid to achieve this sort of growth, a new UK graphic design division is being created to allow the company to tap into other lucrative markets.’
    • ‘The largely amateur, local actors were encouraged to improvise dialogue on the spot in a bid to achieve authenticity.’
    • ‘The latest bid to gain a late-night drinks licence for the Centre may be set for failure, objectors' lawyers have claimed.’
    • ‘This has posed challenges to efforts aimed at scaling down its operations in a bid to make it more efficient and competitive.’
    • ‘In a bid to achieve a settlement the company, he said, had offered more than the government would have achieved via an imposed settlement.’
    • ‘Health chiefs have met finance experts in a bid to resolve a wrangle which is holding up plans for a £96 million ‘super hospital’.’
    • ‘As they enter their final year, it is a year of anxiety and hard work, all in a bid to achieve the objective.’
    • ‘The bank has also come under fire after attempting to discourage customers from using its branches in a bid to cut down on queues.’
    • ‘In a bid to prevent further arson attempts, the horse may be sprayed with a fire retardant substance.’
    • ‘Little squat lobsters were everywhere and flashed into crevices in a bid to attempt to avoid my torchlight.’
    • ‘Police are encouraging residents to join their e-mail information line in a bid to crack down on criminals.’
    • ‘In a bid to limit the damage, the government attempted to maintain it had never raised hopes of an early resolution.’
    • ‘After losing another planning appeal, residents have fortified the site in a bid to prevent attempts to forcibly remove them.’
    • ‘Court officials will be handed sweeping powers to enter homes in a bid to crack down on fine-dodgers.’
    • ‘He said their promotion should be be given first priority in the city administration's plan to promote new teachers in its bid to gain regional autonomy.’
    • ‘Millard House could be transferred to the private sector, in a bid to achieve additional capacity required from the site.’
    • ‘Ministers plan to outlaw happy hours in a bid to crack down on binge drinking.’
    • ‘A spokesman for the Department of Health said the government was introducing a guideline of 18 weeks from referral to treatment in a bid to quell the problems.’
    • ‘Shopkeepers are to be taught the moral and legal responsibilities of selling alcohol in a bid to crack down on under-age drinking.’
    • ‘He returns to the course tomorrow in a bid to prove that his latest effort was no fluke.’
    attempt, effort, endeavour, try
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English bēodan ‘to offer, command’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch bieden and German bieten.

Pronunciation:

bid

/bɪd/

Main definitions of bid in English

: bid1bid2

bid2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Utter (a greeting or farewell) to.

    ‘James bade a tearful farewell to his parents’
    • ‘Then, sadly, they bade farewell to their beloved village and walked together into the forest, leaving behind the dangers that the humans threatened to bring to them.’
    • ‘Though it is not set in stone just yet, there is every chance that he might finally bid farewell to professional football at the end of the season.’
    • ‘Time presses on and I have to bid farewell to Anne.’
    • ‘About 140 pupils bade farewell to the school on Monday and embarked on their half term holiday, which began four days earlier to allow equipment and books to be moved to the new building.’
    • ‘Lynette and the rest of the ladies-in-waiting, including Gwyneth, bid Eleanor a tearful farewell.’
    • ‘The images of my mother crying and holding on to me as we bid a tearful farewell to our home flashed through my mind.’
    • ‘A fine crowd attended the funeral ceremonies and many were very lonesome as they bade their fond farewells to a man who had been such a part of the community over the decades.’
    • ‘More than 2,000 people bade a tearful farewell to the man credited with having a huge impact in his fight for progress for the black community.’
    • ‘It was an occasion for teachers to get together and also to bid farewell to colleagues who were retiring from service.’
    • ‘Tearfully he bade farewell to those he had loved for the past seven years.’
    • ‘He kissed her cheek one last time, leaning over the counter and bid her farewell as she walked out the door.’
    • ‘Staff, pupils and parents are due to bid a tearful farewell to their primary school tomorrow.’
    • ‘He knew he had to set a date of departure so he could bid his farewells accordingly, that much was obvious.’
    • ‘Visitors had a chance to attend mass on Sunday morning, celebrating the association, before they bid tearful farewells at the parting lunch.’
    • ‘In resigning, he bid farewell to one of the top private sector jobs in Ireland.’
    • ‘Hundreds of mourners bid a tearful farewell to the tragic teenager and friends donned specially-made replica England shirts bearing his name.’
    • ‘In another country, on the other side of the continent a young woman bid a tearful farewell to her family, friends and well-wishers.’
    • ‘And so it's time to bid farewell for just over 3 weeks as I depart these shores for a nice holiday in the South of France.’
    • ‘He did not take his third jump and bid a tearful farewell.’
    • ‘The Radio 1 DJ bade a tearful farewell on her last day as host of the breakfast show.’
  • 2literary, archaic Command or order (someone) to do something.

    ‘I did as he bade me’
    • ‘The wizard bade his apprentice sit upon another directly opposite, and Anest obeyed, wondering.’
    • ‘After they left, he wrote the stories she bade him to.’
    • ‘I pulled over, noted the NO STOPPING sign, and bade the family to exit quickly.’
    • ‘When the emperor felt asleep that night, God appeared in his dream and bade him to make a banner portraying the cross, and to draw crosses on the helmets and shields of his soldiers.’
    • ‘I was then but a simple handmaid who did as I was bid.’
    order, command, tell, instruct, direct, require, enjoin, charge, demand, call upon
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1Invite (someone) to do something.
      ‘he bade his companions enter’
      • ‘A short, soft knock came on the wooden door, and presently the call of an elderly woman's voice bid her visitor enter.’
      • ‘I tried sleeping on the sofa but my grandma led me to the master bedroom and bid me sleep on the bed beside my slumbering grandfather, who was on a mat.’
      • ‘Next, the Lap lady passes round a little bowl of reindeer milk which she bids us to drink.’
      • ‘If he is indeed wise he does not bid you enter the house of his wisdom, but rather leads you to the threshold of your own mind.’
      • ‘The same maid-servant entered, but a little confused as to why Chloe stated that the door was open instead of bidding her to enter.’

Phrases

  • bid fair to

    • archaic, literary Seem likely to.

      ‘the girl bade fair to be pretty’
      • ‘I think that he clearly has participated strongly in the formulation of what bids fair to be a successful campaign.’
      • ‘Michael has still to celebrate his 19th birthday and bids fair to be a star footballer for club and county in the years ahead.’
      • ‘This bids fair to become another recorded Beethoven cycle in the making, its completion presumably depending upon sales.’
      • ‘He bids fair to be nominated a choral conductor par excellence.’
      • ‘Though it is at present in its infancy it bids fair to render us valuable assistance; but, so far at least, we have little reason to think that it will ever rival the fingers and the ears for delicacy and exactitude of diagnosis.’

Origin

Old English biddan ‘ask’, of Germanic origin; related to German bitten.

Pronunciation:

bid

/bɪd/