Main definitions of bib in English

: bib1bib2

bib1

noun

  • 1A piece of cloth or plastic fastened round a child's neck to keep its clothes clean while eating.

    • ‘The embroidery on show includes clothing, bras, bibs and covers for the baskets the Dong people used to carry their babies around while they are working.’
    • ‘He removed the grey bib from around my neck and handed me a piece of white tissue.’
    • ‘Other than that, I got a lot of clothes, and bibs.’
    • ‘On a less emotional level, they found that cloth bibs were often scattered all over the house - and usually ended up in places where they weren't needed, such as an upstairs bedroom.’
    • ‘I watched as she got out this thermos flask of hot water and this bottle of milk and a plastic bowl of baby food and spoons and bibs, and went through this complicated preparation procedure.’
    • ‘Given that children smear food into their hair, their ears, along the table, and on you, the small area of protection afforded by the bib is laughable, really.’
    • ‘And this morning, he insisted that Po should wear a bib, and should sit up at his little table to have breakfast with him.’
    • ‘Mummy, you did remember to pack the bibs, didn't you?’
    • ‘At the cutlery and condiments counter, besides the usual articles you will also find plastic baby bibs, cups, beakers, bowls and spoons, which customers are welcome to use.’
    • ‘Through the production company, I've written three books, and I have a small line of T-shirts, umbrellas, kids clothes, and bibs.’
    • ‘I dressed him into a multicolored striped body suit after bathing him and I took him downstairs and put on his bib with the frog on it and fed him mashed apples, formula, and rice.’
    • ‘Families who complete the study get to keep the camcorder they are provided to record their babies' behavior, plus bibs, t-shirts and other promotional items.’
    • ‘Other free items being handed out will include baby bibs warning of the health effects smoking has on babies, balloons, car air fresheners and other colourful items to attract the attention of smokers.’
    • ‘Some were adorned with beads and flowers or wore little hand-knit caps; others had bibs with cartoons and white, ruffled baby hats.’
    • ‘She bounced on his lap in a pouting way, but eventually stopped when he put her baby bib, the plastic ones that come with the kid's meals, around her neck.’
    • ‘Eventually, they see beyond the white walls, white chair, and white bed, to the jeans strewn on the floor, the soiled baby bibs, the jars of organic rice pudding.’
    • ‘He was wearing a baby blue diaper, and a bib with a yellow star on it.’
    • ‘One such gadget is a plastic baby bib that has a reservoir at the bottom to collect mistargeted food items.’
    • ‘Articles such as disposable diapers, bibs, clothing, etc. are disclosed.’
    • ‘He launched the company in the 1990's to produce disposable baby bibs.’
    1. 1.1 A loose-fitting sleeveless garment worn on the upper body for identification, especially by competitors and officials at sporting events:
      ‘the sponsor's name printed on our bibs’
      • ‘There they had to swap their individually coloured bibs with their team mates who then cycled as far as Sheffield Cross.’
      • ‘The teams - in orange, blue or green bibs - are each a deliberate mixture of first-team regulars, substitutes and fringe players.’
      • ‘Still, it might make them enough money to buy a new set of floodlights or training bibs.’
      • ‘As well as the award, which is given for outstanding contribution to football, the school was given new training bibs and footballs, and will also be given support by the FA.’
      • ‘Even with the Ireland team, when bibs are handed out, you know what the starting line-up will be, by the bib colour.’
      • ‘After crossing the checkpoint line, an official punched the appropriate spot on my bib, indicating the completion of the first section, and then pointed me towards the food.’
      • ‘They were not allowed through checkpoints without the bib and computerised chip given to every registered entrant.’
      • ‘The project has already been kitted out with 400 footballs, 14 goals, bibs, cones and ball sacks.’
      • ‘As a Novice licence holder, you must race wearing an orange bib.’
      • ‘The first hour on Wednesday saw a procession of men dressing in bibs of a bilious yellow passing calmly and majestically behind the bowler's arm.’
      • ‘But her name was printed on the front of her numbered bib, and all along the course, people lining the streets called her name.’
      • ‘New winners slipped on yellow leader bibs as the first World Cup ended in Milan after a day of unexpected results.’
      • ‘Each bag contains everything the young players will need to hone their skills - two portable goals, four corner flags, 50 pitch markers, a speed agility ladder, footballs and training bibs.’
      • ‘Well, put on a bib and join the blue side, he was told.’
      • ‘The classes involve jogging, sprinting, star-jumps, stomach crunches and push-ups with participants wearing a numbered bib, allowing easy identification should you need to be shouted at.’
      • ‘Hundreds of airport workers wearing fluorescent yellow bibs were looking out from every available window, or they were atop lorries and vans, or any object they could find, to give them a better view.’
      • ‘I spotted a cleaner sporting a plastic bib with the words Tourist Attractions emblazoned across it.’
      • ‘It was a low-key event, but we did wear bibs and it was timed.’
      • ‘They will arrive at the third World Cup wearing the yellow leader bib and having the prestige of being Britain's most successful crew this season.’
      • ‘One night last December in Beaver Creek, he was hanging out in the village plaza awaiting the announcement of the starting draw and handing out of race bibs for the next day's downhill race.’
    2. 1.2 The part above the waist of the front of an apron or pair of dungarees.
      • ‘My mother walked over to me, wiping her hand on the bib of her apron, and placed her right palm over my forehead, checking for a fever.’
      • ‘Her apron bib was high to the collar in front, and fastened with straps which crossed at the back.’
      • ‘Margarite’s heart was beating like a drum under her apron bib.’
      • ‘Sue had made a special holder inside the bib of his dungarees.’
      • ‘"You get on with it, Charley," said she, giving him the can and fishing a spoon from the interior of her apron bib.’
      • ‘On her shoulders she wore a small dark-colored fichu that crossed upon her breast, which was also covered by the large bib of her apron.’
      • ‘But some of the silk eveningwear was fit for the most glamorous of parties, apron bibs floating across the chest then twisting into straps over the shoulders and asymmetrically across the back before dripping into a train.’
      • ‘Her apron bib had a strap that went around her neck and the waist strings were tied behind her back.’
      • ‘Rose smoothed her hands down the bib of her dungarees.’
      • ‘The company has continued to add full and bib apron styles and colors, and it has expanded its line, and introduced a new poplin smock.’
      • ‘That would be a pair of pink hot-pants with bib and braces that I once made but thankfully never wore.’
      • ‘My face was scratched by the starch on her apron bib.’
      • ‘Unique to the garden store is a rugged nylon bib with five mesh pockets suitable for holding and organizing hand tools and seed packets.’
      • ‘"Take it; oh, you must!" he stammered, and thrust the envelope into the bib of her apron and ran back to his room, groaning and frowning as if he had hurt himself.’
      • ‘Lifting her dark eyebrows, she looked at him with surprise in her squinting eyes, as if asking, “What is this for?” took the photo silently and put it in the bib of her apron.’
    3. 1.3 A patch of colour on the throat of a bird or other animal:
      ‘a black bird with a white bib’
      • ‘The wattle (a flap of loose skin extending like a bib from the bird's neck) will turn blue at the base, graduating into a deep rose pink that hangs down like a pendant.’
      • ‘They have a black mask and bib, yellow and white wing bars and yellow tip to the tail.’
      • ‘The white-breasted kingfisher is a noisy brown, bright blue and white bird, sporting a large white bib and a powerful red bill.’
      • ‘The black bib did extend outwards towards the throat and wasn't as neat as on a Marsh Tit.’
      • ‘It has dark streaks on its back and flanks, and the male has a black bib and crown; the female is more drab, although still an attractive bird.’
      • ‘Has anyone seen ‘Fluffy’, a large tiger cat with a white bib and bushy tail?’
      • ‘Runway is black with a white bib, whiskers and socks.’
      • ‘The female is paler and lacks the grey crown, white cheeks, black bib and eye stripe and chestnut brown nape, but has a straw coloured stripe behind the eye.’
      • ‘The males' smart plumage boasts a grey crown, white cheeks and black bib.’
      • ‘There should be no other colors on the bird except for a nice broad white bib under it's throat.’
      • ‘They have rufous breasts, or bibs, that contrast sharply with their white bellies.’
      • ‘It is a pale tan colour, though the cap and bib are darker brown.’
      • ‘My first intimate contact with these dark - to smoky-gray birds with the white bibs was in 1951, when my family moved to Maine.’
      • ‘It was black with a white bib, a red tail and an orange and yellow beak.’
      • ‘The male, however, is readily recognized with his heavy black bib, which may be rather washed out in winter, white cheeks and chestnut on the back of his head.’
      • ‘Tibi is a long-haired tabby with a white bib and paws.’
      • ‘In addition, males had significantly larger black bibs than did females, but there was no rank-based variation in the size of those bibs among males.’
      • ‘The male is unmistakable; scaly, sooty-black plumage offset by a white crescentic bib.’
      • ‘Dippers are rounded, short-tailed, rather wren-like birds in form but almost thrush-sized; a striking feature is the large white bib against otherwise dark plumage.’
      • ‘A wheatear with white eyebrow and orange bib perched nearby, robin shaped, hardly larger, soon to fly to Africa.’
  • 2A common European inshore fish of the cod family.

    Also called pout or omitted unresolving XREF to "pouting"
    • ‘It made a perfect backdrop to photograph a huge shoal of bib and pollack, which jostled each other for position.’
    • ‘Big female cuckoo wrasse, pollack, several bib and a John Dory were all I could see, although my view was slightly obscured by several fronds of kelp.’
    • ‘Diving with his camera gear, assistants and lighting equipment, Francis was staggered by the number of bass, bibs, conger eels, red mullet and other fish that abound.’
    • ‘Divers have reported balleen wrasse, pollard, cod, bib and even basking sharks swimming around the frigate's passageways.’
    • ‘Sunlight streamed in, illuminating numerous bib, pollack, mullet and bass.’

Phrases

  • one's best bib and tucker

    • informal One's smartest clothes.

      • ‘It was back in 1999 when the three pals decided to don their best bib and tucker for a day on the town.’
      • ‘Certainly, he will have his best bib and tucker on for Saturday's extravaganza.’
      • ‘And the ladies were there in their best bib and tucker competing for Queen of Fashion which was judged by a TV presenter.’
      • ‘I've got my best bib and tucker on today, to mark the shattering climax of the project.’
      • ‘There is not even any need to put on your best bib and tucker, because the restaurant itself is a surprisingly unostentatious venue that specialises in simplicity.’
  • stick (or poke) one's bib in

    • informal Interfere.

      • ‘So your input is nothing less than you sticking your bib in where it was neither asked for, nor wanted.’
      • ‘If the Premier was to stick his bib in and overturn the ruling, the right and proper ruling of the state’s senior law officer, we would be on the way to anarchy.’
      • ‘Jeff asks why his old man had to stick his bib in; he could have won - he knows he could have; now look at him: useless.’
      • ‘He has always enjoyed the process of politics, getting people on side, coming up with better plans and speaking out in committees—or as he puts it, sticking his bib in.’
      • ‘And you can bet Alison will stick her bib in it again.’

Origin

Late 16th century: probably from bib.

Pronunciation:

bib

/bɪb/

Main definitions of bib in English

: bib1bib2

bib2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]archaic
  • Drink (something alcoholic):

    ‘after a considerable amount of wine-bibbing, I settled down’
    • ‘They evidently mistook this brandy-bibbing as a swaggering habit of mine; whereas I was honestly prescribing for myself what had been recommended to me as the best preventive of cholera.’
    • ‘On the other side of the church was a large and excellent bowling-green, which was much frequented by the idle fellows of the village, who preferred ale-bibbing in the sun before confinement on the loom or at the lap-stone.’
    • ‘He appreciated the elevation of set habits - wine-bibbing, walks, a little antique collecting - into a kind of well-regulated art.’
    • ‘Though the issue of drink was not raised in these cases, it is likely that a visit to market would have included ale-bibbing.’
    • ‘The front room is full of cocktail drinkers, the next full of whisky-bibbing geezers, a third full of students watching television, while in the back room two interchangeable blondes played pool.’
    drink, swallow, guzzle, slurp, attack, down, drink down, drink up, force down, get down, finish off, polish off, drain, empty, imbibe, have, take, partake of, ingest, consume, sup, sip, lap
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: probably from Latin bibere to drink.

Pronunciation:

bib

/bɪb/