Definition of betroth in English:

betroth

verb

[WITH OBJECT]dated
  • Formally engage (someone) to be married:

    ‘in no time I shall be betrothed to Isabel’
    • ‘But you'll have to wait till I'm betrothed to start roaming around on our trip around Angkora!’
    • ‘At the age of two he was betrothed to the three-year-old Catherine of Aragon, daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain.’
    • ‘I think I was betrothed to Cotton Eye Joe, a frail man who smelled of cheese, who would unexpectedly leap up out of his stool now and again as if someone had set fire to it.’
    • ‘Consequently, he sentences her to a gruesome death - despite the fact that she is betrothed to Creon's son, her cousin.’
    • ‘In 1428 James I's daughter was betrothed to the dauphin, and Scots in the French army helped enable the success of Jeanne, and the subsequent expulsion of the English, completed in 1453.’
    • ‘In 28 she was betrothed to Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus, to whom she bore one son, the later emperor Nero, in 37.’
    • ‘I was betrothed to Deshan and sent to Pegasus shortly after my ascent to womanhood.’
    • ‘The Earl is no doubt offended for by law, I am betrothed to his daughter.’
    • ‘And I'm betrothed to a man I hardly know and I'll have to go away and live with him in a land full of strangers.’
    • ‘Or ‘Thumbelisa’ (better known as ‘Thumbelina’), in which a tiny girl is betrothed to a velvety mole.’
    • ‘He was betrothed to Claire and he was carrying on with some… some hussy of a woman.’
    • ‘Eventually she is betrothed to Polixenes' son.’
    • ‘The circumstances of his early life are obscure, but we know that in 1277 he was formally betrothed to his future wife, Gemma Donati, and that in 1289 he took part in military operations against Arezzo and Pisa.’
    • ‘In December 1813 she was betrothed to William, prince of Orange, but broke off the engagement, not wishing to move to Holland.’
    • ‘Angel gave a nervous laugh, ‘I'm almost betrothed to Rilith and I'm sure it was just a one time thing.’’
    • ‘So you were betrothed to me since you were born.’
    • ‘I was betrothed to their eldest daughter named Emma.’
    • ‘You still don't understand who it is I am betrothed to.’
    • ‘We are ‘just good friends’ for she is betrothed to another.’
    • ‘Jak did not notice, or at least he did not say anything, ‘The princess is betrothed to some prince from some country, they're scheduled to be married a year from today, on her sixteenth birthday,’ he paused.’

Origin

Middle English betreuthe: from be- (expressing transitivity) + truth. The change in the second syllable was due to association with troth.

Pronunciation

betroth

/bɪˈtrəʊð//bɪˈtrəʊθ/