Definition of beside in English:

beside

preposition

  • 1At the side of; next to.

    ‘he sat beside me in the front seat’
    ‘the table beside the bed’
    • ‘They managed to locate the man near the phone box and noticed that he had a petrol can sitting beside him.’
    • ‘A few clothes lie folded on a chair, make-up spread on a table beside her computer.’
    • ‘The alarm goes off steadily on the bedside table beside the bed, two short double-beeps and a long.’
    • ‘Aiden was kind enough to ask me to sit beside him at the table that he had all to himself.’
    • ‘Access is either through the side alleyway beside the pub or from the car park at the rear.’
    • ‘She walked back to the trunk and took the photo out and placed it on the small table beside the bed.’
    • ‘Sitting at a window table beside the raised ring road we were hardly aware how much traffic was about.’
    • ‘In the evening he stood beside me as I sat at my dressing table removing my make-up.’
    • ‘He wasn't surprised when the hunter arrived at the house later and sat beside him at the long table.’
    • ‘He placed it on the table beside the love seat she had chosen, and sat down next to her.’
    • ‘She sat down beside me at the table, silent for a long moment before asking a question.’
    • ‘Her husband, who was sitting beside her, sustained a whiplash injury and an injury to his shoulder.’
    • ‘I was sitting in a low chair with my laptop on a coffee table beside me.’
    • ‘They sat at one of the better tables up beside the parapet overlooking the courtyard.’
    • ‘I had my lunch sitting beside the war memorial cross in an almost grotto-like setting.’
    • ‘He was content to sit there beside her, head on her shoulder, watching her write up her research notes.’
    • ‘She pulled a tissue out of the box on the table beside the bed and wiped her own cheeks with it.’
    • ‘When I found it in my pocket that night, I put it on the table beside my bed.’
    • ‘There was a small table with a bowl beside his bed and a person sat on a chair overlooking him.’
    • ‘Young boys sat beside the masters, learning by watching and then experimenting on a small scale.’
    alongside, by the side of, at the side of, next to, parallel to, abreast of, at someone's elbow, with, by
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    1. 1.1 Compared with.
      ‘beside Paula she always felt clumsy’
      • ‘Don't feel ugly beside them, you're beautiful in a classy way.’
      • ‘But I feel ugly beside Willow and wonder how she can bring herself to look at me, never mind kiss me.’
      • ‘Just about everyone knows what it’s like to be unsure about his or her future, and to feel inadequate beside someone else.’
      • ‘They might just feel stupid beside those who are much better than themselves.’
      • ‘I feel inadequate beside such a combination of beauty and formal writing education.’
      • ‘She is so clever and intelligent, I look at her and think "Wow, I feel stupid beside her".’
      compared with, in comparison with, next to, against, contrasted with, in contrast to, in contrast with
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  • 2In addition to; apart from.

    ‘he commissioned work from other artists beside Minton’
    • ‘Generally speaking all persons who are capable of making wills may be executors, and some others beside, as infants and married women.’
    • ‘Our community has Japanese, Vietnamese, Russian, Chinese and several others beside Mexicans.’
    • ‘Extra charges like snorkeling, canoeing and others beside the package rate are at the expense of the individual’
    • ‘Also I would like to find out if Willam had other children beside George in 1809.’
    • ‘Are there other writers beside you who have done this?’
    • ‘Students with a complaint often want to point to failings in the university's conduct of its affairs that affect other students beside themselves.’
    • ‘My 1 year old son has no contact with other children beside his sister!’
    • ‘You only give respect to people who respect others beside themselves.’
    • ‘Some children acquire at home the habit of attention to the well-being of others beside themselves.’
    • ‘They separated these poor girls, and others beside them, in several villages, and drove them out of the church.’
    • ‘There are other animals beside dairy cows that are used for by-products while they are still alive.’
    • ‘There are two other artists beside myself that I would like to incorporate into the fabric of my discussion.’
    • ‘“If there are others beside me who are going through the same physical symptoms, the medical community has an obligation to help us.”’
    • ‘I gathered these two and headed over to the customer service counter to ask if there were any others beside the ones on the shelf.’
    • ‘She has four coordinators for the Web site, four other writers beside herself, several photographers and substantial technical assistance.’

Usage

Some people say that beside should not be used to mean ‘apart from’ and that besides should be used instead (he commissioned work from other artists besides Minton rather than he commissioned work from other artists beside Minton). Although there is little logical basis for such a view, and in standard English both beside and besides are used for this sense, it is worth being aware of the potential ambiguity in the use of beside: beside the cold meat, there are platters of trout and salmon means either ‘the cold meat is next to the trout and salmon’ or ‘apart from the cold meat, there are also trout and salmon’

Phrases

  • beside oneself

    • Overcome with worry, grief, or anger; distraught.

      ‘she was beside herself with rage’
      • ‘As you can imagine his wife and children are beside themselves.’
      • ‘Jenny was beside herself with excitement, but also with worry.’
      • ‘I'm beside myself with anger over this comic.’
      • ‘Parents were beginning to arrive here at the gates, absolutely horrified, beside themselves with worry.’
      • ‘Sarah is beside herself with grief, and the British Consulate say they are going to get her home as soon as possible.’
      • ‘In effect, all asylum seekers will be considered bogus until proven otherwise, and refugee charities are understandably beside themselves.’
      • ‘But I certainly wouldn't be beside myself with grief if I had more time to spend on my books and other projects.’
      • ‘Of course, as you can imagine, all the neighbouring nursery owners (this is a big area for horticulture) were beside themselves with worry.’
      • ‘‘To say that they are beside themselves with worry would be an understatement,’ he said.’
      • ‘I was, you know, just beside myself with anger and disappointment.’
      • ‘At a dinner party last week, a middle aged New Zealander was beside himself with grief at the loss of his lovely young live-in girlfriend.’
      • ‘Nathaniel looked calm, while her father was beside himself with anger.’
      • ‘Gabe was beside himself with worrying and hoping that Monique wasn't really pregnant.’
      • ‘The Generals were beside themselves with bottled emotion.’
      • ‘We were beside ourselves with rage and grief at the sufferings and humiliation of mankind.’
      • ‘I was beside myself with lots of emotions, but one stood out in particular.’
      • ‘Marion, it was said, beside herself with grief, threw herself from the ramparts of Comlongon Castle in 1570.’
      • ‘In the picture, she's really overcome with emotion, so beside herself with glee and honor at having won a Golden Globe, that it's all she can do to remain vertical.’
      • ‘The mother was beside herself with grief and couldn't answer any questions.’
      • ‘Their friends and family are beside themselves with worry and grief, and not having any power to do anything to ease the situation is incredibly frustrating.’
      distraught, overcome, out of one's mind, frantic, desperate, distracted, not knowing what to do with oneself, at one's wits' end, frenzied, in a frenzy
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Origin

Old English be sīdan (adverb) ‘by the side’ (see by, side).

Pronunciation

beside

/bɪˈsʌɪd/