Definition of bequest in English:

bequest

noun

  • 1A legacy:

    ‘a bequest of over £300,000’
    • ‘However the opportunities to grant bequests, or to leave legacies and gifts are pre-empted.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, the picture collection continued to grow by purchase, bequests, and marriage settlements.’
    • ‘From various patrons they may receive outright gifts, sponsorships, bequests, donations in kind and money.’
    • ‘The financial means to pursue these objectives came from benefactors' bequests some of which were very considerable - and economic activities.’
    • ‘Those with significant assets are more likely to fund large charitable gifts or bequests, making for more challenging work.’
    • ‘And outright gifts and bequests to charity are completely free of inheritance tax.’
    • ‘The support to the annual appeal, requests for donations, bequests and events organised by the society has been fantastic and is much appreciated.’
    • ‘Funding comes from campaigns, bequests, legacies and the continuing generosity of citizens.’
    • ‘Ninety percent of the collections are gifts or bequests.’
    • ‘Earlier this year the foundation successfully bid £26,000 using money from its Development Fund, comprising bequests and donations by members.’
    • ‘This inaugural donation of silver to the society was followed by many more gifts and bequests of family silver over the next century.’
    • ‘Alternatively, you could offer what is left of the value of your estate after all debts and administration expenses have been settled and any specific bequests have been met.’
    • ‘Funded largely by public donations and bequests, the RPSCA has a privileged status as the inspector and prosecutor of state laws on animal cruelty.’
    • ‘Outline the division of your estate giving details of cash legacies to friends or charities, bequests of specific property.’
    • ‘Alumni and other private donors contributed $156 million more in donations, bequests and non-government grants and contracts.’
    • ‘The religious charity said today it was ‘humbled’ by the generosity of one of the biggest bequests ever made.’
    • ‘The Flower Fund is funded by bequests, along with donations given instead of flowers at funerals, from which it takes its name.’
    • ‘The charity gets no support from national or local government and is entirely reliant on donations, bequests and fundraising.’
    • ‘Monasteries were foremost among the great landowners because, as in western Europe, they received donations and bequests from the laity.’
    • ‘One idea for improvement might be to tax each bequest rather than the estate as a whole: smaller bequests would be untaxed.’
    legacy, inheritance, endowment, estate, heritage, bestowal, bequeathal, settlement, provision, benefaction, gift, present, contribution, donation
    devise, hereditament
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[mass noun] The action of bequeathing something:
      ‘a painting acquired by bequest’
      • ‘Once the legitimacy of first acquisition is settled, all subsequent acquisitions by the saving of income, exchange, gift or bequest of assets can be defended on the ground of mutual consent.’
      • ‘Trembling, I opened the envelope and surveyed the contents - a notice of bequest from a long-time member of the congregation.’
      • ‘As far as is known, however, no other members of the family received any of the Duchess' jewels by bequest.’
      • ‘By making a contribution of bequest this year, you will be helping to ensure a safer, more nutritious food supply, both today and in the years to come.’
      • ‘But, the United States Government is not precluded from receiving and holding copyrights transferred to it by assignment, bequest, or otherwise.’
      • ‘Donors are encouraged to continue adding to the endowment yearly and/or by bequest, deferred charitable gifts or estate planning.’
      • ‘By the early 14th cent. the endowment of almshouses had become a favoured form of charitable bequest.’
      • ‘There are, however, small collections of 78, 45 and 33rpm discs and CDs acquired by bequest and donation.’
      • ‘New artefacts are being brought in all the time either by donation or bequest.’
      • ‘There were, however, an unusual few who plan to do the bulk of their giving by bequest.’
      • ‘On the way through it you pick up some non-internal assets (if you don't already have some as a result of bequest or student-life thrift).’
      • ‘Presumably it's precisely in order to avoid incurring such a duty that persons choose to transfer things by bequest rather than by gift.’
      • ‘Essentially, it is plans for wealth transfers by bequest and gift which separate lifetime positive savers from lifetime zero savers.’
      • ‘Its special character as a university museum has shaped its personality, as its collections have been built up largely by gift and bequest from graduates since its foundation in 1816.’
      • ‘It provides that, in case of 'property, acquired by bequest, devise, or inheritance, the basis shall be the fair market price or value of such property at the time of such acquisition.'’
      donation, gift, benefaction, offering, present, handout
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from be- ‘about’+ Old English cwis ‘speech’, influenced by bequeath.

Pronunciation:

bequest

/bɪˈkwɛst/