Definition of belt and braces in English:

belt and braces

phrase

British
  • (of a policy or action) providing double security, by using two means to the same end.

    ‘the envelope was sealed with tape and staples, a real belt and braces job’
    • ‘It may be an attempt at a get out or a legal belt and braces against inevitable environmental criticism if the plan is approved.’
    • ‘I think that you will agree that we have taken a belt and braces approach in attempting to guarantee your worst case bottom line profit.’
    • ‘I believe that my amendment does give belt and braces to ensure that in the very rare likelihood that that happened, there would at least be a court registrar or District Court judge ensuring that the proper process had taken place.’
    • ‘Yet in spite of this belt and braces approach, with those who can influence such situations expressing concerns, we had this situation.’
    • ‘‘I have taken a belt and braces approach to make it absolutely safe and legal,’ he said.’
    • ‘I suspect it may turn out to be a belt and braces kind of problem.’
    • ‘It is very much a belt and braces approach in relation to derivatives.’
    • ‘In a belt and braces recommendation, the report suggests that people use a hands-free kit while ensuring that the phone is not placed in contact with other parts of the body.’
    • ‘Essentially, its a belt and braces approach,’ Chief Inspector Ashcroft told us.’
    • ‘Honestly, how much belt and braces does the Minister need to give himself to keep the Government safe?’
    • ‘But it has always been their way to make sure that things are done in a belt and braces way, very solid job, and plenty of agent, plenty of weapons, whatever weapons system they have developed they have always over-produced.’
    • ‘But we used to have a belt and braces approach-not just detonators on the line to give an audible warning, but also a lookout, and often derailers, which would stop anything getting near the worksite.’
    • ‘Of course that will not stop all viruses and there really is no reason why, on a computer costing many hundreds of pounds, you should not spend less than £50 on anti-virus software, belt and braces if you like.’
    • ‘In a belt and braces move, the caveats have been removed from the Attorney General's legal advice. Lying by omission is still lying.’