Definition of bellow in English:

bellow

verb

[no object]
  • 1(of a person or animal) emit a deep loud roar, typically in pain or anger.

    ‘he bellowed in agony’
    • ‘Nick bellowed in pain, as she scrambled for her purse, crawling away.’
    • ‘The demon bellowed in pain, but it was hardly defeated.’
    • ‘The soldier bellowed and bent over in pain, but still held onto Cairn to the best of his abilities.’
    • ‘From our seats we view huge bulls bellowing like gladiators and bowlegged, skinny-bottomed cowboys in chaps nonchalantly smoking rollups.’
    • ‘That's not to say musk-oxen are docile around people: Aggressive bulls will bellow at or charge humans when confronted and, on rare occasions, maim or even kill.’
    • ‘The beast bellowed in pain as it let go of Gilian and hunched over from bloody wounds.’
    • ‘I was bellowing, it was an awful noise, and the next thing I knew I struck out at her.’
    • ‘One person bellowed as he gripped the metal tube in his meaty hands.’
    • ‘The differently colored animals bounded for the boy, the bear bellowed viciously, the wildcat snarled loudly, and the hawk screeched harshly.’
    • ‘Men were bellowing and roaring as they charged, lost to all rational thought.’
    • ‘The creature was still bellowing presumably due to the smell of blood that now filled the cavern.’
    • ‘As the Beast bellowed, the horses bolted in fear.’
    • ‘He bellowed in pain and slowly slumped to the ground.’
    • ‘Before the word could leave Mark's lips, Dad bellowed in rage.’
    • ‘The bull is bellowing again, there's a burst of rain and wind.’
    • ‘When the pair arrived back at the scene, the man atop the horse was still bellowing.’
    • ‘One guard bellowed in alarm, the other in pain as Yuki sank her teeth into his arm and kicked his shin.’
    • ‘Several of the bulls started bellowing and the cows mooing.’
    • ‘She bellowed in pain and fell to the floor in agony.’
    • ‘The beast bellowed and fell back, at this sound another one yowled behind Artemis and as he spun around a sword grazed his side, creating a deep gash.’
    blare, boom, roar, thunder, bellow, pump, shriek, screech
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    1. 1.1reporting verb Shout something with a deep loud roar.
      with object ‘he bellowed out the order’
      with direct speech ‘‘Not sausage and mash again!’ he bellowed’
      • ‘They were in their early twenties the night that Sullivan bellowed out the cue that began the most agonizing five minutes of their lives.’
      • ‘The governor, already on board, is bellowing at us, and several women are crossing themselves and muttering prayers.’
      • ‘One grubby-looking vagrant recently followed me up the road, bellowing at me about how much he needed money for his ‘hard drugs’.’
      • ‘I joined other hopeful punters in front of the race screen, bellowing encouragement from the sidelines.’
      • ‘He fires again, and then, shotgun in hand, charges the mob, bellowing at the top of his lungs.’
      • ‘The two then bellowed out laughing as they clinked their glasses together in mock agreement.’
      • ‘He bellowed out in his loudest voice, ‘This lion fears us!’’
      • ‘Leon bellowed out and stormed towards her, lifting his hand.’
      • ‘On his way out, he came back to the guard, who was now bellowing at those before the deity to move on even as he blocked the queue.’
      • ‘Captain Ferguson bellowed encouragement, his words occasionally drifting up into the stand.’
      • ‘Bahamut's voice bellowed out onto the snow-covered plains, his bass voice commanding the attention and hearts of every soul there.’
      • ‘Waving his arms wildly, he bellowed out the only German word of urgency he could recall: ‘Schnell!’
      • ‘But no, they had to convey their extreme excitement by bellowing at us through the mic, and permanently damaging our hearing.’
      • ‘They straggled across the green, all three generations of them, bellowing at each other as if they were at least half a mile apart, rather than the two paces that actually separated them.’
      • ‘The cops in front of her were bellowing at the man, trying to make him let her go.’
      • ‘The past few weeks she's been at her worst, and today has been the worst in the five-and-a-half-years I've been here - she's been bellowing at the sky from breakfast to teatime.’
      • ‘A large table of patrons was raising glasses and bellowing at each other gleefully.’
      • ‘With a widened look of panic in his eyes, he bellowed out to Laverne.’
      • ‘Shouts and screams continued to be bellowed out by the spectators lining the streets of Pau.’
      • ‘They've been tearing into each other in party meetings, bellowing at each other through their newspaper columns, accusing each other of vanity, iniquity, venality, even conviviality.’
      roar, shout, bawl, thunder, trumpet, boom, bark, bay, yawp, yell, yelp, shriek, howl, scream, screech, call, cry, cry out, sing out, whoop, wail, caterwaul
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    2. 1.2with object Sing (a song) loudly and tunelessly.
      ‘a dozen large men were bellowing ‘Jerusalem’’
      • ‘Reaching out and turning up the radio, she was soothed by the sounds of the group as they bellowed one of their newer songs out of her speakers.’
      • ‘Local firefighters who had risked their lives to help in the rescue efforts were sent on a lap of honour in open-topped cars while after a minute's silence the Indianapolis children's choir bellowed out the national anthem.’
      • ‘When not stopping to bellow a song, they wander into all sorts of unseemly situations.’
      • ‘It had rained all weekend and I was not in the mood to haul a sodden plant into the house and bellow songs.’
      • ‘Three sets of drums kept the rhythm steady, flanking him while he bellowed the song's opening lyrics.’
      • ‘An enormous peasant jumped up and bellowed a song in which he imitated all the animals of the barnyard, confusing the animals somewhat, so that he crowed for the mule and whinnied for the pig.’
      • ‘A young man in shirt and tie is pacing and bellowing a song in a strong accent, disturbing the people around him.’
      • ‘Susan was terrified, she'd bellow songs to scare away ghosts before she ventured into a dark room.’
      • ‘Italians are spilling on to the track in their thousands, a beaming rider is being held aloft and crowds of youths are bellowing out a victory song.’
      • ‘Hundreds of Canadian expats crammed into the London pub last night, letting out a sustained roar and bellowing the national anthem at least three times after the national men's hockey team won Olympic gold.’
      • ‘As he stammers, then bellows the last chorus of ‘(Do Not Feed The) Oyster ’, the kingdom rejoices: Their prince is free.’
      • ‘Below his crew bellow a song with gusto “Rule Britannia, Britannia rules the waves” and from high above he cries “That’s the way to do it!”’
      • ‘He stumbles around, bellowing a song about dying on dry land.’
      • ‘Although Glenn said it was pretty demanding, it really showed off the strength of his voice as he bellowed out the chorus with the other boys in the background.’
      • ‘There were women in various stages of undress, aged hacks bellowing out nationalist folk songs, several figures slumped in corners and enough booze to float a battleship.’
      • ‘He decides to play drunk, and bellows songs while the cantina staff pick him up and drag him towards the doors.’
      • ‘The English rugby anthem Swing Low, Sweet Chariot was bellowed out by more than 600 fans, eager to see their team finally clinch the longed-for title.’
      • ‘Once we reached an agreement we rambled through the campsite bellowing the song out and no doubt disturbing the sleep of many.’
      • ‘Let us do what the Vikings did for their departed ones and raise giant mugs of mead and bellow songs of warrior conquests!’
      • ‘He held his arms out to the crowd as he bellowed the chorus and danced.’

noun

  • A deep roaring shout or sound.

    ‘a bellow of rage’
    • ‘I suddenly open my mouth and let forth a tremendous bellow of laughter.’
    • ‘Letting out a bellow of rage as my feet were swept from under me, I instinctively rolled away just as a tentacle swept the clayey silt where I'd been a fraction of a second ago.’
    • ‘Chloe looked up in shock as she heard an angry bellow echo through the huge homestead.’
    • ‘The bellow echoed through the whole house, I was sure.’
    • ‘A scant few feet in front of the boys, the attacker turned with a bellow of rage.’
    • ‘She didn't hear the footsteps madly raging towards her, or the ferocious bellow of defiance that should have greeted her ears.’
    • ‘Lightning flashed in the dark ocean ahead and soon followed by the bellow of the thunder call.’
    • ‘The second guard spoke, his voice a bellow in order to be heard over the murmuring crowd.’
    • ‘The sound of Joseph's bellow drew her eyes back to the center.’
    • ‘That scream from the treetops is answered by another, and another, until the tropical forest shakes under a thundering bellow.’
    • ‘There was so much noise already; I didn't want to introduce a competing bellow.’
    • ‘With a collective bellow of rage, the creatures advanced.’
    • ‘They shouted at each other, someone called Claire was mentioned and there was many an anguished bellow.’
    • ‘He forced a sound out: what started as an infernal bellow emerged as a whimper.’
    • ‘Dad let out a bellow of laughter, which made us all started laughing.’
    • ‘The demanding bellow of a team of oxen, coupled with the shouts of their teamster startled them in to moving again.’
    • ‘Deep in the forest of bright green ferns there was a resounding crash, a rustling and, after a short silence, a delighted bellow.’
    • ‘Up ahead, an irritated bellow echoes around the hall.’
    • ‘And a ferocious bellow of rage brought the girl back to her senses.’
    • ‘He tried to form a mighty bellow but only a shriek escaped his lungs.’
    roar, shout, bawl, bark, bay, yawp, yell, yelp, shriek, howl, scream, screech, call, cry, whoop, wail, caterwaul
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: perhaps from late Old English bylgan.

Pronunciation

bellow

/ˈbɛləʊ/