Definition of beg in English:

beg

verb

  • 1reporting verb Ask someone earnestly or humbly for something.

    with object ‘he begged his fellow passengers for help’
    with object and infinitive ‘she begged me to say nothing to her father’
    no object ‘I must beg of you not to act impulsively’
    • ‘I'm begging anyone with any information to contact the police.’
    • ‘I beg of you, do not distress yourself over this.’
    • ‘I beg of you, mother, to walk me down the aisle for no other person would be suited to do so in my eyes.’
    • ‘So I beg of you, please, do not carry on this tradition.’
    • ‘I beg of you please revive the life of this young boy, Hardy.’
    • ‘Save me from any more embarrassment, please I beg of you - whoever is in charge of embarrassing people!’
    • ‘If I have done anything to screw it up, I beg of you to push it aside and forgive me.’
    • ‘When he had left the house, he had pleaded and begged his grandmother to come with him, but she had refused.’
    • ‘Michelle smiled at her other two friends, begging them to forgive him as she had.’
    • ‘That night Paul and John begged their father to play.’
    • ‘I pleaded for him and begged them to take me instead, but they forced me away.’
    • ‘God please, please, please, I beg of you, make my feelings for Jalil disappear.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, farmers are begging their banks for the funds to survive.’
    • ‘So, I beg of you, when you see a cyclist on the road, give plenty of space.’
    • ‘If I speak to you less often and seem less cordial than before, do not be offended, I beg of you.’
    • ‘I could hear her begging my father for my forgiveness, but I could also tell that she was failing as my father's voice dissipated completely.’
    • ‘She bows down at his feet (no Pharisee in Galilee did that!) and presents herself humbly as she begs for his help.’
    • ‘Children cried and clung to their fathers, begging them not to go.’
    • ‘‘Please I beg of you, think of what your doing’ Eve said, pleading for her life.’
    beseech, entreat, implore, adjure, plead with, appeal to, pray to
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object Ask for (something) earnestly or humbly.
      ‘he begged their forgiveness’
      • ‘Then the exhausted Shackleton begs ships from numerous navies until he finally returns for his crew in an almost unparalleled saga of the bravery we all want to be able to show and only a handful ever manage.’
      • ‘In every other aspect of daily life there's usually something that stands out and begs the attention of the eye or the ear - typestyles fall out of favor, and hence define an era.’
      • ‘She was right to go to the women, express her sincere regret and ask their forgiveness, but she was wrong to continue begging it once it was clear they would not give it.’
      • ‘There are many others, in scouting, involved and I beg their forgiveness for not mentioning them by name.’
      • ‘His eyes begged a silent plea of forgiveness, but she only shook her head.’
      • ‘Do I find a Master and beg of him to solve this riddle?’
      • ‘The two delegates approached the supreme leader on several occasions trying to beg mercy for their fellow reformers.’
      • ‘‘Humbly do I beg your forgiveness, Lord,’ she said clearly, bowing her head.’
      • ‘I most humbly beg leave to trouble your grace with these few lines.’
      • ‘Luckily he is very polite and begs forgiveness.’
      • ‘Then, embarrassed by his own behavior, Orlando begged their forgiveness and hurried to retrieve Adam.’
      • ‘Just as I was about to beg their forgiveness, I saw the energy between them changing.’
      ask for, request, plead for, appeal for, call for, sue for, solicit, seek, look for, press for
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    2. 1.2with object Ask formally for (permission to do something)
      ‘I will now beg leave to make some observations’
      no object, with infinitive ‘I beg to second the motion’
  • 2no object Ask for food or money as charity.

    ‘a young woman was begging in the street’
    ‘they had to beg for food’
    • ‘Egypt must not remain poor and must not beg for food from the international community.’
    • ‘So the crippled beg for food but are shown little compassion.’
    • ‘A man begging cornered me and asked me for some spare change.’
    • ‘He assumed that she was a wandering beggar who had come to beg for food and shelter.’
    • ‘What is even worse is when people actively beg for money, in that they come up to you in the street and ask you for money.’
    • ‘He recounts the incident of a man who came to beg for food for his starving child.’
    • ‘You might see two parents working hard for a living, and yet their children would beg for food in the streets.’
    • ‘Their decision to beg seems to be paying handsome dividends.’
    • ‘She was so low on money these days that she felt the need to beg for money.’
    • ‘A friend told me that it was better living on the street, because there you could beg for money and food.’
    • ‘I'm going to go beg for money and we might end up with enough to rent a room to stay for tonight.’
    • ‘Her husband, William Good, was a simple laborer and his inadequate income forced the Goods to accept charity and to beg for goods from their neighbors.’
    • ‘The poor were also allowed to beg for money in these buildings.’
    • ‘At times we are forced to go and beg for food from nearby homesteads.’
    • ‘Maybe she could find the train station and beg for some money to catch a train out or town.’
    • ‘They were poor having no stock save a cow and a few hens, and often had to beg for food around the parish.’
    • ‘They beg for money, often using bits of broken English they pick up from the occasional soldier they encounter.’
    • ‘Every day poor people came to her house to beg for food and every day she sent them away with nothing.’
    • ‘He had to beg for money in order to eat, but received very little.’
    • ‘They have gone to streets in town where they beg for money to survive.’
    ask for money, solicit money, seek charity, seek alms
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1with object Acquire (food or money) from someone by begging.
      ‘a piece of bread which I begged from a farmer’
      • ‘The journey took three days; he begged food and money along the way.’
      • ‘They slept in the open and begged food from farmers.’
      • ‘She begged money from parishioners going to and from St Anne's Cathedral.’
      take as a loan, ask for the loan of, receive as a loan, use temporarily, have temporarily
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    2. 2.2 (of a dog) sit up with the front paws raised expectantly in the hope of a reward.
      • ‘A laugh escaped, she looked like a small puppy begging for attention again.’
      • ‘The smartly dressed man shooed the boy away, as if it was an annoying dog begging for a piece of meat.’
      • ‘Her party trick is to stand on her back legs and beg for food very much like a dog begs.’
      • ‘His eyes were glinting with pleading; he looked like a dog begging for food.’
      • ‘My tongue stops midway to going back into my mouth, with the ice cream still on the tip, I must look like a dog begging for a bone or something.’
      • ‘He would sit up and beg for food every few moments, at which point Kayty would take something off of her plate and hold it out for him.’
      • ‘It took him five minutes to walk to the backyard shed, inside would be the cute little puppy Shadow, whom would lick and beg for food from Chad.’
      • ‘Mom's eyes were like a puppy's begging for a scrap from the dinner table.’

Usage

The original meaning of the phrase beg the question belongs to the field of logic and is a translation of Latin petitio principii, literally meaning ‘laying claim to a principle’, i.e. assuming something that ought to be proved first, as in the following sentence: by devoting such a large part of the budget for the fight against drug addiction to education, we are begging the question of its significance in the battle against drugs. To some traditionalists this is still the only correct meaning. However, over the last 100 years or so another, more general use has arisen: ‘invite an obvious question’, as in some definitions of mental illness beg the question of what constitutes normal behaviour. This is by far the commonest use today and is the usual one in modern standard English

Phrases

  • beg one's bread

    • archaic Live by begging.

      • ‘Better were it for us to beg our bread and clothe ourselves in rags, than to part with Christian simplicity and frankness.’
      • ‘He was a boy of nine years old when he buried first his father and then his mother, and he had no other resource than to beg his bread from door to door.’
      • ‘She had even to beg her bread on the streets; for who wanted to help the woman who wasted wheat?’
      • ‘Face flushing a deep red with anger, Lisette was of a mind to box Bess’ ears soundly then send her away to beg her bread as a vagrant along the roads.’
      • ‘By this unlucky accident, he that had seen so much of the world for such a length of time was reduced to the most indigent state, and at length forced to beg his bread.’
  • beg the question

    • 1(of a fact or action) raise a point that has not been dealt with; invite an obvious question.

      ‘some definitions of mental illness beg the question of what constitutes normal behaviour’
      • ‘Saying that the consideration is what moves the transfer begs the question, really, because the question here is, what does move it?’
      • ‘In fact, it only begs the question of whether they have evolved at all.’
      • ‘Which begs the question: do you think they were raised by bears?’
      • ‘No real surprises here but it begs the question of why such obvious flaws were never caught in advance.’
      • ‘It has proved difficult to argue for one choice over another without simply begging the question against competing positions.’
      • ‘She obviously didn't have a clue - which begged the question about why she was even here and how she'd even got the job.’
      • ‘It does beg the question about whether its findings proved embarrassing.’
      • ‘In fact, it begs the question whether preserving today's national boundaries is a worthwhile goal.’
      • ‘But we don't really believe that, and the topic begs other questions, like: How many younger women are rocking the establishment?’
      • ‘They are out there being a problem well past midnight which begs the questions, do their parents know where they are and what they are doing?’
      • ‘Which begs the big question: What is the right thing?’
      • ‘But that begs the question of why that deal happened now as opposed to two years ago and what we had to give up to get it.’
      • ‘It also begs the questions as to who benefits from these matches, because Clare can have learned little about themselves from what was little more than a training exercise.’
      • ‘But this obviously begs the question: who gets control of the remote?’
      • ‘While the new questions do not seem provocative, they do beg the question: What is the point of it all?’
      • ‘It seems that every political question ultimately begs the question, ‘how do we proceed?’’
      • ‘It begs the burning question - are they engagement rings?’
      • ‘Which begs a question: Who, then, is tougher than an opponent?’
      • ‘These facts beg the question: Are these AIDS awareness initiatives ineffective?’
      • ‘But the idea of biking around in cold weather, or bombing down a snowy mountainside, begs some obvious questions: isn't it kind of dangerous?’
    • 2Assume the truth of an argument or proposition to be proved, without arguing it.

      • ‘But this begs the question, for it assumes that the state and religion arose from two independent sources.’
      • ‘It may be objected that this argument begs the question.’
      • ‘This argument assumes the conclusion, and so begs the question.’
      • ‘There are two people internal to her investigative staff that have recommended an independent counsel on the basis of what we know today, and to say she wouldn't do it, begs the question.’
      • ‘The argument has been criticized for begging the question: it assumes the universe is designed in order to prove that it is the work of a designer.’
      • ‘It therefore begs the question and doesn't prove a thing about real-life biological evolution.’
      • ‘It might be argued that it begs the question to assume that exploitation can be mutually advantageous and consensual.’
      • ‘And an argument that begs the question clearly does not work.’
      • ‘It seems to me that this begs the question as well as implicitly assuming a kind of universal agreement about human rights that I don't think is historically supported.’
      • ‘These arguments are indeed plausible, but beg the question.’
      • ‘Hasn't Hume just begged the question against them - not so much proved that they are wrong as simply assumed it?’
      • ‘The problem with many of the criteria is that they either assume what they seek to prove or simply beg the question.’
  • beg to differ

    • Politely disagree.

      • ‘I beg to differ in my reaction to it and in my opinion on the matters she raises in her letter.’
      • ‘You can't imagine there being a time when film wasn't part of her plans - although she begs to differ.’
      • ‘The industry begs to differ, arguing that what we are witnessing is a cultural change and that the health and fitness club will remain an important part of the commercial property market.’
      • ‘‘I don't think we're very good students anymore,’ she says; however, Carmen begged to differ.’
      • ‘A prominent Beverly Hills estate agent begged to differ; if the property could be subdivided, he felt it could attract offers of around $20m.’
      • ‘And if anyone assumes there is anything slapped together about it, he begs to differ.’
      • ‘‘This is obviously an extremely dangerous game,’ he opined, and none begged to differ.’
      • ‘Danny, who has worked here for three years, begs to differ.’
      • ‘A great many economic historians have begged to differ.’
      • ‘Much of the rest of civilization begs to differ.’
      protest, protest against, lodge a protest, lodge a protest against, express objections, raise objections, express objections to, raise objections to, express disapproval, express disapproval of, express disagreement, express disagreement with, oppose, be in opposition, be in opposition to, take exception, take exception to, take issue, take issue with, take a stand against, have a problem, have a problem with, argue, argue against, remonstrate, remonstrate against, make a fuss, make a fuss about, quarrel with, disapprove, disapprove of, condemn, draw the line, draw the line at, demur, mind, complain, complain about, moan, moan about, grumble, grumble about, grouse, grouse about, cavil, cavil at, quibble, quibble about
      View synonyms
  • beg yours

    • I beg your pardon.

      • ‘I was stunned. “I beg yours? Did you say …?”’
  • go begging

    • 1(of an article) be available because unwanted by others.

      ‘there was a spare aircraft going begging’
      • ‘‘We are a country of the last minute,’ said Cesare Vaciago, director general of the Turin organising committee, in response to reports in the last fortnight that 370,000 of the one million available tickets were still going begging.’
      surplus, surplus to requirements, superfluous, too many, too much, supernumerary, excessive, in excess, going begging
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1(of an opportunity) fail to be taken.
        ‘the home side had themselves to blame as chances went begging’
        • ‘He wasn't so foolish to talk about all the opportunities that went begging.’
        • ‘Chance after chance went begging in the second half.’
        • ‘This was a wake up call for the brothers and they started to convert the opportunities that had earlier gone begging.’
        • ‘Although they scored four tries, at least five other golden scoring opportunities went begging.’
        • ‘They missed the chance to go ahead after seven minutes when a penalty opportunity went begging.’
        unutilized, not made use of, unemployed, unexploited, not in service, non-functioning
        View synonyms

Phrasal Verbs

  • beg off

    • Withdraw from an undertaking.

      ‘I'd planned to take Christy to dinner, but I was in a mood, and I begged off’
      • ‘Only Casper - who insisted we were moving too slow, since by this time we'd climbed only one peak in 26 hours of travel - begged off.’
      • ‘She has even had to beg off a meeting in Asia to make the round trip.’
      • ‘Something about his urgency penetrated Tennyson's chord-sotted brain: after a brief confused pause, he begged off the dance and went to look for Clara by the citrus and bubblegum punch fountain.’
      • ‘You can't know what types of arguments a future case might present, but you do know the arguments presented in past cases so there is no reason to allow a nominee to beg off on answering such a question.’
      • ‘But if you're going to use the ‘it's not my specialty’ excuse to beg off answering one question, why doesn't that stop you from making claims in all those other non-specialties?’
      • ‘I finally begged off on some excuse and put down the controller.’
      • ‘His first term as mayor began in 1352, he was re-elected the following year, and then for an unprecedented third consecutive term - on that occasion he begged off, but again served in 1359/60 and 1366 / 67.’
      • ‘Weak with laughter, I finally begged off… but only when he announced he had to go to the toilet and be funny in there.’
      • ‘I've spent the last three nights working until 1am and I'm rather tired of it, so I'm going to beg off tonight.’
      • ‘One thing I know… this one I won't be begging off of when the kids want to go see it.’
      • ‘Karl begs off when first invited into her home, but returns when he finds she left her gloves in the cab.’
      • ‘I had to constantly beg off invitations to the local ‘tittie bar’ from co-workers, but our section of the warehouse stocked all forms of luggage and back packs, and to this day, I am fully stocked with all forms of luggage and backpacks.’
      • ‘So if you allow me, I'll beg off of a guess on that one.’
      • ‘With no evidence of any of these matters, I had to beg off.’
      • ‘Granted, I begged off being a bridesmaid, so it could be worse.’
      • ‘Having posted a list of ‘Perfect Albums’ a while back, I'm half tempted to just beg off.’
      • ‘Through a spokesman, she begged off with a claim that she was ‘on a long-planned trip with her husband and two children.’’
      • ‘People who forward too much volume or too little of interest find people begging off their lists.’
      • ‘We were going to rehearse, but Drew's begging off,’ Cash, the drummer, remarked with a smirk.’
      • ‘Then Dailey begged off because he had just finished directing something.’
      • ‘You know, and Dean begs off the question, wisely, I thought.’
      • ‘Could you picture someone like Kathy Griffin begging off a celebrity show because of mosquitoes?’
      • ‘Mr. Thomas suggested a walk on deck after dinner, but Caroline begged off and hurried back to her cabin, leaving him to adjourn to the smoking room to mingle with the other male passengers in second class for a while before retiring to bed.’
      • ‘The Duke of Osaka has begged off from the evening activities; I understand that he was sorely traumatized that the people behind the attacks were members of his daughter's staff.’
      • ‘That being the case I'm betting I can legitimately beg off spending Christmas with anyone and stick to my original plan of cleaning the kitchen, watching some dvd's and going online - after a very long lie in.’
      • ‘You know, when the weather's so rotten you can beg off school or work and no one thinks you're just being a bum?’

Origin

Middle English: probably from Old English bedecian, of Germanic origin; related to bid.

Pronunciation

beg

/bɛɡ/