Definition of beetling in English:

beetling

adjective

  • [attributive] (of a rock or a person's eyebrows) projecting or overhanging:

    ‘piercing eyes glittered beneath a great beetling brow’
    • ‘Encouraged by the romantic writers of the nineteenth century, we too find in the life of castle, cathedral, and beetling hilltop towns a poetic refuge from an industrialized world.’
    • ‘The house itself is built upon a lot of greensward which runs down amid some great, beetling rocks.’
    • ‘With his massive build, black beetling eyebrows and perma-frown he resembles a pantomime baddie.’
    • ‘If the prime minister is searching for a cause, here it is, in front of his beetling brow most days of the week.’
    • ‘No beetling precipice, of which she ever heard, had fallen and crushed so much as the sheep feeding in the valleys.’
    • ‘The beetling cliff falls sheerly to the seething sea beneath.’
    • ‘Grain by grain, the vast foundations, the beetling escarpments, the high domes in air are crumbled away and drifted into the valleys.’
    • ‘The walk up the ramp from Waverley Station reveals on the left the beetling houses and gothic towers of the Old Town, clinging to the sides of the Castle rock.’
    • ‘He thinks that Gaulish skulls were round, with beetling brows.’
    • ‘To their (very small, admittedly) credit, they told me what had happened when, with beetling eyebrows and pursed lips, I enquired.’
    • ‘The examiner was a Dr Bull, an elderly (or so he seemed to me) anatomy lecturer of rather Victorian appearance, with mutton chop whiskers and beetling eyebrows.’
    • ‘Beetling brow, well defined nose, thin pursed lips and long ear lobes characterize the face.’
    • ‘Despite the constant messages we all get that women like brawny, beetling browed men covered in muscles, most women can tell you that the musclebound weightlifter isn't their style.’

Pronunciation

beetling

/ˈbiːtlɪŋ/