Definition of beatification in English:

beatification

noun

  • [mass noun] (in the Roman Catholic Church) declaration by the Pope that a dead person is in a state of bliss, constituting a first step towards canonization and permitting public veneration:

    ‘a ceremony of beatification in St Peter's Square’
    • ‘In some press accounts this act was linked with the expected beatification, not of Pius XII, but of Pius IX.’
    • ‘The life of Fr Mullen was featured recently on the RTE programme ‘Nationwide’, which, combined with the book, is hopefully seen as a step towards beatification.’
    • ‘Her beatification, the penultimate step on the way to sainthood, has taken place at surprising speed even in the context of the ‘saint factory’ that is the contemporary Vatican.’
    • ‘As an outsider, I am of course not entitled to a view about who deserves beatification or canonization.’
    • ‘Once declared a holy person, the next step is beatification and finally canonisation.’
    • ‘The problem is that you confused beatification and canonization.’
    • ‘The Vatican has recognized a miracle that she's believed to have performed, a key step in her beatification.’
    • ‘Both the Blet and Cornwall volumes are also part of the current struggle over the possible beatification and canonization of Pius XII.’
    • ‘We wrote a pretty irreverent piece on the Pope's beatification of two dead shepherd children.’
    • ‘In the 1990s, a number of bishoprics in Germany, Luxembourg and France began to support his beatification by the Roman Catholic Church.’
    • ‘Last month the Vatican announced the long-awaited beatification of John XXIII.’
    • ‘The date chosen for her beatification, Mission Sunday, is the Sunday closest to the twenty-fifth anniversary of the pontificate of John Paul II and to the end of the Year of the Rosary.’
    • ‘Their beatification at a ceremony in St Peter's Square marks the final step before actual canonisation through the Roman Catholic Church.’
    • ‘The beatification and canonization of Juan Diego bring into question the integrity of the process followed by the Congregation for the Causes of the Saints.’
    • ‘Solanus Casey is a textbook example of the traditional candidate for beatification and canonization.’
    • ‘His beatification, the first step to sainthood, is expected to take five years, far shorter than normal.’
    • ‘Thus far, the most vocal opposition to Pius IX's beatification and potential canonization comes from the Jewish community, especially in Italy.’
    • ‘The Vatican said at the weekend that a decision in favour of the pope's eventual fast-track beatification would be the ‘exclusive competence’ of his successor.’
    • ‘After Escrivá's death in 1975, a third of the world's bishops petitioned the Vatican to open his cause for beatification and canonisation.’
    • ‘The facts emerged only during the investigation of her life preceding her beatification, which takes place in Rome this month.’

Origin

Early 16th century (in the sense ‘action of making blessed’): from Old French, or from ecclesiastical Latin beatificatio(n-), from beatificare make blessed, from Latin beatus blessed.

Pronunciation

beatification

/bɪˌatɪfɪˈkeɪʃ(ə)n/