Definition of be down to in English:

be down to

phrase

  • 1Be attributable to (a particular factor or circumstance)

    ‘he claimed his problems were down to the media’
    • ‘While they are willing to admit that some teenage eccentricities may be down to biological factors, they believe pressures imposed on them by modern society are also to blame.’
    • ‘But what we still are not sure about is how much of our performance at Imola was down to circumstances at the track that day.’
    • ‘Yet Dave Blackwell, leader of the Canvey Independent Party, disputed the council's claim that the savings were down to increased efficiency.’
    • ‘The reason why annuities currently represent such poor value for money - and are likely to do so for the foreseeable future - is down to low interest rates and other market factors.’
    • ‘But the modest schoolgirl claims all her success is down to the most important person in her life - her mum Sonia.’
    • ‘The reason organic farming has such a small market share is down to two factors; price pressure from supermarkets which can make a marginal crop unviable, and lack of support from the government.’
    • ‘The Government has claimed most of the job cuts were down to falling pupil numbers, but the survey suggested three-quarters of the redundancies and lost posts were in schools where rolls had stayed the same or risen.’
    • ‘Police say this is partly down to a new system for how they deal with and record violent crime.’
    • ‘Phillips claimed that class was not a major issue because ‘less than 10 percent of ethnic segregation is explained by economic factors, much more is down to history and to choice’.’
    • ‘A spokesman for Columbus Direct, Britain's biggest independent holiday insurer, agreed that most claims were down to the customer's carelessness.’
    1. 1.1 Be the responsibility of (a particular person)
      ‘it's down to you to make sure the boiler receives regular servicing’
      • ‘Pointing out that all such products carry clear age restrictions like those on films, they maintain that responsibility for censorship is down to individual users and their parents.’
      • ‘A spokesperson for Burnley Council said: ‘It is down to dog owners to become more responsible.’’
      • ‘‘The responsibility of logging incidents of bullying is down to the individual school,’ said a Council spokesman.’
      • ‘Earlier the court heard that the final decision as to what was contained in the maintenance contract was down to the person operationally responsible for the building and not design services.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, Blackburn claim it is down to West Brom to make the next move in the wrangling over Neil Clement's proposed transfer to Ewood Park.’
      • ‘But TGM's operations manager Maddie Norman stuck to her guns and claimed it was down to the council to rescue the service.’
      • ‘We all have to take responsibility for it because what happened was down to everybody - the parents, teachers, governors, and pupils.’
      • ‘We do not have a responsibility to the students - it is down to the council to provide transport for them.’
      • ‘Whether that trend in carried forward in Southampton is now down to you.’
      • ‘It's down to guys like me to pass on the flaming torch of knowledge to the next generation.’
  • 2Be left with only (the specified amount)

    ‘I'm down to my last few pounds’
    • ‘Even companies which a few years ago were sitting on treasure chests of spare cash are now down to their last few billions.’
    • ‘I was down to my last few dollars in poker chips when I made an astounding comeback.’
    • ‘Defence lawyers say Rupert was down to his last $1,100 when the FBI approached him.’
    • ‘So I lit up another cigarette - I was down to my last three by then, and at the start of my trip I had a fresh pack - and started thinking.’
    • ‘Bruce is down to his last 16 available players for tonight's game.’