Definition of be at (or have come to) an end in English:

be at (or have come to) an end

phrase

  • 1Be finished or completed.

    ‘negotiations were virtually at an end’
    • ‘As this young soldier realises his life has come to an end, he stops and he thinks.’
    • ‘It is clear that, if a contract did exist and was at an end, then negotiations can continue.’
    • ‘He said: ‘Now the money is at an end the Tourism Partnership ceases to exist.’’
    • ‘The signs weren't looking good last week but indeed after this past week's events I think it's safe to conclude that our time on this planet has come to an end.’
    • ‘They do not cease to exist even after the body has come to an end.’
    • ‘The spokesman for the environmental group says the research has come to an end and should be concluded.’
    • ‘They insisted that although they still wanted negotiations to continue they had to regard them has having come to an end.’
    • ‘It was only as a result of a threat of legal action by the developer that the dispute had come to an end.’
    • ‘Only when these issues have been addressed and the occupation has come to an end will democracy cease to be an empty concept.’
    • ‘‘The talks with officials had come to an end, but before we concluded they came up with the new issue which did not concern us,’ he said.’
    1. 1.1 (of a supply of something) become exhausted.
      ‘our patience has come to an end’
      • ‘But the evidence now suggests that their patience is at an end.’
      • ‘I've been respectful, accepting, and tolerant, but my patience is at an end.’
      • ‘By mid-September the emissary's patience was at an end.’
      • ‘A storm is brewing, patience is at an end, and war looks inevitable.’
      • ‘‘That promise has not been kept and, speaking personally, my patience is at an end on this issue,’ he said.’
      • ‘Graduate trainees, who said ‘their patience had come to an end,’ have accused the government of political interference in appointments.’
      • ‘However, it turns out that the social-democratic electorate's patience has come to an end.’
      • ‘Within two minutes, however, it was Sanft touching down at the other end and adding the goal points.’
      • ‘Fire Brigades' Union delegates emerged from a national meeting after deciding their patience was at an end and they had no option but to stage a new, 24-hour walkout.’
      • ‘I have no idea as to how long he had been waiting, but it was clear that it was his turn and his patience was at an end, you might say.’