Definition of be (or find oneself) in a minority of one in English:

be (or find oneself) in a minority of one

phrase

humorous
  • Be the sole person to hold a particular view.

    ‘once again, Britain is in a minority of one within the EC’
    • ‘In this, as in other quarrels, Wilson found himself in a minority of one.’
    • ‘As a self-proclaimed ‘moderniser’, I used to think that I was in a minority of one as a Euro-sceptic.’
    • ‘I may be in a minority of one, but wonder whether it might not have been better to recognize that he is a reformed person, and rather than hound him to readily accept him back into the community.’
    • ‘Following the two recent by-elections in the Central and Western wards the Conservative administration is in a minority of one and could be outvoted if Labour and the Liberal Democrats do a deal.’
    • ‘I have long been in a minority of one among my friends in preferring the Flat to National Hunt.’
    • ‘Lets put it this way, when Murali gets to 500 wickets, Warne will be in a minority of one in the list of most admired & gentlemen cricketers with 500 Test wickets.’
    • ‘Last night there was relief in Downing Street that the prime minister right had not ultimately found himself in a minority of one.’
    • ‘‘I'll be watching England's match against Sweden at a friend's house in the privacy of a small World Cup party and yes, obviously, I'll be in a minority of one,’ he tells me.’
    • ‘It is also true that, within the Government, let alone the Parliamentary Labour Party, he was in a minority of one in his support for top-up fees as the means by which to achieve that end.’
    • ‘As new entrants to the European Union happily join the single currency, Britain could easily be in a minority of one among 25.’