Main definitions of bay in English

: bay1bay2bay3bay4bay5

bay1

noun

  • 1A broad inlet of the sea where the land curves inwards.

    ‘a boat trip round the bay’
    [in place names] ‘Sandy Bay’
    ‘the Bay of Biscay’
    • ‘In winter, Common Loons can commonly be found on marine bays and inlets along the coast.’
    • ‘There are view benches for the loveliest and longest curve of the bay.’
    • ‘In the east, in complete contrast, there is a dramatic and wildly beautiful rocky coastline broken by a multitude of bays, inlets and sea lochs.’
    • ‘For the past three days the biplanes have been coming and going from a local airstrip, offering an aviation equivalent of a trip round the bay.’
    • ‘Every evening, young lovers meet on the Malecón, a long promenade that curves round the bay.’
    • ‘Byron has had some good tuna being landed as the bay is holding some healthy schools of baitfish.’
    • ‘This is a huge advantage of fishing the Baltic: there are so many bays and inlets and fjords that many, many of them have never seen an angler in recent history.’
    • ‘Many of the bays and inlets are simply beautiful and consist of rock or sand, sometimes dropping away dramatically into 50 feet of water, at other times sloping gently in to shallows of just a few feet.’
    • ‘In winter, they are found in woodland ponds and swamps, as well as coastal estuaries, bays, and inlets.’
    • ‘Standing a moment longer on the shore he watches the dinghy, until it tacks out of sight on the far side of the broad bay, heading for harbour.’
    • ‘Pristine white beaches with beautiful bays are within easy reach, and although rooms are hard to come by in high summer, it is possible to camp on the dunes without incident.’
    • ‘Since colonial times, much of the land surrounding the bay has been used for agriculture.’
    • ‘It was an amazing panorama over Hobart, the Derwent Valley and all the inlets, bays and coves that meet the Southern Ocean.’
    • ‘Adults return to inlets adjacent to bays and estuaries for spawning, and eggs are swept into nursery habitats presumably by tidal action.’
    • ‘Oysters, clams and other shellfish thrive in bays and inlets, as do many species of crabs and fish.’
    • ‘It was a gorgeous view from the top of the cliff, looking down on the houses that sat all around the curve of the bay.’
    • ‘The bay is beautiful - long and curving - and has thousands of Palmyra palm trees.’
    • ‘For the next 18 months not a single ship landed cargo in the bay.’
    • ‘Although well situated, not all of the land around the bay could be developed easily.’
    • ‘Melbourne lies against an inlet bay facing the Bass Strait, and beyond the Strait lurks the icy Antarctic Ocean.’
    lough
    cove, inlet, estuary, indentation, natural harbour, gulf, basin, fjord, ria, sound, arm, bight, firth, anchorage
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1An indentation or recess in a range of hills or mountains.
      • ‘As Trevor said this, they passed over the mountains, showing a bay with a large city surrounding it.’
      • ‘Now its weathered walls contrast with white window frames; the old front door discovered beneath the iron again opens to the hills and bays below.’
      • ‘The Paceville district (pronounced ‘Patchyville’), where she will stay, lies on a hill between two bays.’
      • ‘It was imperative to get into the sheltered bays near to the mountains as soon as possible where we might find some respite from the impending storm, so we pressed on relentlessly for another hour or so.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French baie, from Old Spanish bahia, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

bay

/beɪ/

Main definitions of bay in English

: bay1bay2bay3bay4bay5

bay2

(also bay tree, sweet bay, bay laurel)

noun

  • An evergreen Mediterranean shrub with deep green leaves and purple berries. Its aromatic leaves are used in cooking and were formerly used to make triumphal crowns for victors.

    laurel
    • ‘Put the remaining giblets into a saucepan with a thyme sprig, bay, sage, star anise, half the onion and 1 clove garlic.’
    • ‘Add the bay, thyme, rosemary, garlic, orange zest, cinnamon and a splash of dry sherry.’
    • ‘For something a little bit different you could go for a bay with its ball of leaves sitting atop a trunk trained into a spiral - but be prepared to pay for the novelty.’
    • ‘The flavor of the bay infuses the potatoes - it's a perfect accompaniment to fish or poultry.’
    • ‘He concluded that, ‘Civilization is a fine thing, and it may spread itself like a green bay tree in the cities, and lordly mansions of the millionaires, with al!’’
    • ‘Pour in the white wine (there'll be five glasses left, after all) and add the bay, thyme and parsley stalks.’
    • ‘Among the others are tanoaks, California black oaks, Shreve's oaks, madrones, rhododendrons, manzanita, big leaf maples and bay laurels.’
    • ‘It's great combined with bay, garlic, onion, thyme and basil.’
    • ‘Put a slice of garlic, some basil, thyme and bay in each cavity.’
    • ‘On an outside window sill, basil, thyme, bay, chervil, sage, chives and marjoram will grow happily in a pot.’
    • ‘This is mainly in lawn, with a raised flowerbed, two apple trees, a pear tree and a bay tree.’
    • ‘Apart from funding, there are problems to overcome that are in common with many city gardens: the site is on Commercial Street, a busy road, so the plants - especially the yew, box and bay trees - have been chosen to withstand pollution.’
    • ‘Try it with basil, bay, garlic, thyme, and even oregano to add depth and a subtle perfume to your foods.’
    • ‘Yes, the station had a perfectly charming garden including a herbaceous border, rose beds, lupins and mop-headed bay trees in green tubs.’
    • ‘The experiment (conducted May - June 2000) tested whole and torn leaves from 10 bay trees, 10 oak trees, and 10 toyon trees at our research site.’
    • ‘Cut back overgrown specimens of spotted laurel, bay, box, fatsia, skimmia and evergreen cotoneaster.’
    • ‘The bay was the laurel with which poets and victorious warriors and athletes were crowned in classical times.’
    • ‘Leaves on the sweet bay and bigleaf (M. macrophylla) have silvery undersides that shimmer in the wind.’
    • ‘He also grows grapes, tomatoes, aubergines, peppers, squash, sage, thyme, rosemary and bay.’
    • ‘Anyone that has a sunny patch of ground or a window-box can grow these herbs of parsley, garlic, basil, bay laurel and oregano.’

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting the laurel berry): from Old French baie, from Latin baca berry.

Pronunciation:

bay

/beɪ/

Main definitions of bay in English

: bay1bay2bay3bay4bay5

bay3

noun

  • 1A space created by a window line projecting outwards from a wall.

    • ‘Its window bays were small and separated by brick columns that gave them a stately appearance.’
    • ‘Originally the paved part of the terrace was smaller and was flanked by two areas of lawn, mirroring the articulation of the window bays above.’
    • ‘Its window wall of five front bays and two side bays provides a stunning effect of light and a panoramic view to the southeast.’
    • ‘He also discovered original pine boxed sash shutters in the window bays.’
    • ‘This bedroom has both a bay and velux window and could suit a variety of uses such as a den or games room.’
    • ‘Windows wrap around the bays, flooding in light and, as glass was still expensive, proclaiming his wealth.’
    • ‘One of my earliest memories is looking down through a bay of picture windows at the Tillamook factory and watching milk curdle on the way to becoming cheese.’
    • ‘Each window projects as a bay, with a base low enough to sit on and wide enough to serve as a generous shelf for flowers and cards.’
    • ‘No, window walls are not bays or picture windows.’
    • ‘On three floors, a curving stone staircase leads from the hall to the first floor where the principal bedroom has an elegant bay of arched sash windows.’
    alcove, recess, niche, nook, cubbyhole, opening, hollow, cavity, corner, indentation, booth
    apse
    inglenook
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A section of wall between two buttresses or columns, especially in the nave of a church.
      • ‘Work proceeded in 90-ft-square bays using a temporary vertical column rising from each of the tree column pedestals.’
      • ‘This great anonimo's work is confined to the upper walls of the first two bays from the façade and the vault of the first bay.’
      • ‘The new tower, north transept extension, chapel and cloister bays are all built of cut stone laid with lime over solid brickwork.’
      • ‘The portico is centered on the main body of the house, which was originally seven bays wide and six bays deep.’
      • ‘The latter, separated from the former by a solid wall, consists of five bays.’
      • ‘Rebuilding after a fire began in the 1220s at the east end; the main transepts and the first bay of the nave were up by 1260.’
  • 2[with modifier] A compartment with a specified function in a vehicle, aircraft, or ship.

    ‘a bomb bay’
    • ‘No less than three radiators sit in the engine bay, one for the air conditioning and one each for the low and high temperature cooling loops.’
    • ‘They also had a small roadster there with their electric motor, but I was unable to see into the engine bay as they had lost the keys!’
    • ‘After the Lexicon was docked, crews from the shipyard unloaded the Aloft and transported the shuttle deep inside the engineering bays where her new engine lay waiting.’
    • ‘After popping the hood your eyes quickly glance over a very functional engine bay.’
    • ‘Investigation of the left engine revealed a ruptured afterburner fuel line deep inside the engine bay.’
    • ‘Repair work on a Mercedes will never be cheap, no matter how much room is in the engine bay.’
    • ‘The whole assembly fits in the Zafira's stock engine bay.’
    • ‘After we found no residual fire, we opened the engine bay and inspected it.’
    • ‘A railroad rail inspection system is provided for use in conjunction with a non-railbound vehicle having an equipment bay.’
    • ‘The front wings now incorporate an air duct, which helps keep the engine bay cool during operation, and a new door mirror design.’
    • ‘Don't expect the first Ezee engines off the assembly line to go directly into the engine bays of future vehicles, however.’
    • ‘Considering how tight most engine bays are after a few accessories are added, this venting addition can reduce heat stress on a variety of products under the bonnet.’
    • ‘They gave the car a tighter engine bay, short nose and shorter overhangs, front and rear.’
    • ‘The RAA looked at it and decided that since there was no large pile of oil underneath the car, or flames billowing from the engine bay, there was little they could do.’
    • ‘Shen led Saki out of the main seating area and into the cargo bay of the ship.’
    • ‘Rei ran up the cargo bay ramp and continued running until she got to the elevator.’
    • ‘If the engine bay has been steam-cleaned be suspicious.’
    • ‘He changed buttons and called the strike team, waiting in the boxy looking cargo bay just forward of the freighter's engine compartment.’
    • ‘The results would have been devastating if that screwdriver had lodged in the landing gear or in the engine bay of one of our aircraft.’
    • ‘I suspect the soundproofing from the engine bay was deliberately moderated, so the driver can hear all the action under the bonnet.’
    1. 2.1An area specially allocated or marked off.
      ‘a loading bay’
      • ‘The two headed out to the vehicle bays and checked out a cruiser, then headed out on the road.’
      • ‘Kate's office was empty, but asking Jamie at the command station yielded the news that Kate had been last seen headed to the vehicle bays.’
      • ‘They use a hand-held computer to register the number of a vehicle and its location in the parking bay so it can be checked if it has been moved.’
      • ‘Bradford Council has since said it would only implement the parking bay scheme if residents felt it was the only solution to all-day parking in residential streets.’
      • ‘They handed me my standard issue hospital togs, bringing memories of wisdom teeth and tonsils flooding back, and wheeled me to a pre-op holding bay.’
      • ‘‘I have found to my disgust able bodied drivers who seem to think it alright to park in these special bays,’ he said.’
      • ‘The proposals would have created eight new workshop bays and 30 extra parking spaces.’
      • ‘The removing of the bus bay is a victory for people power as residents had handed in more than 160 signatures to Lambeth Council protesting against the scheme.’
      • ‘Ideally I would like to see the existing wall moved back to allow room to provide a safe parking bay along this area.’
      • ‘It now has twelve shooting bays on a well-kept range with regular target shooting taking place under lights on Monday and Wednesday nights as well as daylight target shooting.’
      • ‘This means more vehicles through the service bay and more profit for the dealer.’
      • ‘Most of the street's parking bays have been allocated to stores.’
      • ‘The number of baggage carousels has been reduced by one, despite the fact that aircraft bays have increased by 10.’
      • ‘The new plans involve the first fully automated driving range in the town with 20 bays and an impressive range with 11 target greens and a short game academy.’
      • ‘After systems are up and ready, Pioneer is pulled out of its hangar bay by a vehicle adjacent to the runway for startups.’
      • ‘They had found the vehicle bay in what had been the bus area.’
      • ‘Demarcation of bus bays should be done and haphazard parking by the vehicles should be checked by enforcing laws.’
      • ‘There is also a short-term parking bay outside Blockbusters (marked yellow on the plan).’
      • ‘It pulled into a parking bay and the engine jolted before becoming silent.’
      • ‘Each brand will get two bays at the driving range so interested golfers can try out all the latest models and perhaps get some needed advice.’
    2. 2.2British A short terminal platform at a railway station also having through lines.
      • ‘There is a disused bay platform at Hellifield if the most that could be afforded was connections there, and if traffic justified, through trains could be run.’
      • ‘Included in the infrastructure design would be a bay platform at Rathcormac.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French baie, from baer to gape, from medieval Latin batare, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

bay

/beɪ/

Main definitions of bay in English

: bay1bay2bay3bay4bay5

bay4

adjective

  • (of a horse) brown with black points.

    • ‘The bay filly scored her first career win on August 27 at Newmarket after finishing second in her career debut on August 14.’
    • ‘She even went for one little black mare with a bay foal at her side, but was finally outbid at $6,000.’
    • ‘This is not equine racism, just the obvious conclusion that the brown, black and bay horses are in the vast majority, and can always gang up on a grey, especially when I have bet on it.’
    • ‘Before the steps a Dane held the bridle of Sidroc's bay stallion.’
    • ‘Dry Creek Stables purchased the bay filly for $31,000 from consignor Cashel Stud, agent.’
    • ‘Consigned by Cottage Stables, the bay colt will be sent to the United States to the stable of California trainer Jim Cassidy.’
    • ‘The bay filly, bred in Kentucky by Maverick Production, snapped a five-race losing stretch with the triumph.’
    • ‘Nicola was on a gray mare, Landon rode a black horse, and Michael sat astride the same bay gelding that had headbutted him.’
    • ‘The bay colt returned to training last winter, but he missed the Triple Crown races due to recurring physical problems.’
    • ‘She was thrilled with the bay gelding's performance, especially how easily he made the time.’
    • ‘Trained by Brian Meehan, the bay colt has won two of ten career starts and has earned $65,639 for owner Joe Allbritton.’
    • ‘The bay colt has collected six wins in ten career starts.’
    • ‘John Storer purchased the bay filly from consignor Anderson Farms, agent.’
    • ‘When it is said that this bay colt, recently bought by the businessman Michael Tabor, is the apple of his trainer's eye, the words are much more than the usual conjecture.’
    • ‘Solomon is a 16-year-old bay gelding with whom she would trust her life.’
    • ‘The bay gelding was previously conditioned by Norman Miller III.’
    • ‘And Miller has a hand in every aspect of the bay gelding's life.’
    • ‘The bay filly has five wins from nine starts and has earned $381,080.’
    • ‘At that moment, a rider on a spotted dark bay horse came out from the city.’
    • ‘Ridden by Christophe Lemaire, the bay filly stalked the leading pair, Titian Time and Fraloga.’

noun

  • A bay horse.

    • ‘Three horses, one white, one gray and a bay, are limping down St. Claude Street.’
    • ‘The handsome bay had a lot of brilliance, but a times lost his focus, including skipping into the canter in his first medium trot.’
    • ‘After quickly saddling and bridling Fleet, he grabbed the bay's reins and pulled the reluctant gelding outside into the pouring rain.’
    • ‘The bay gave a soft whinny and the Prince couldn't help but feel as if he was being laughed at.’
    • ‘The dark bay looked a hair stiff at times, and missed one of his changes, but was smooth and accurate throughout.’
    • ‘Pletcher said the big bay battled for as long as he could before developing laminitis, leading to his euthanasia.’
    • ‘Only bays, chestnuts, or sorrels are accepted into the unit and that's only if they pass the training, vet, and farrier evaluations.’
    • ‘The soldiers ride bays or chestnuts and use United States Army regulation saddles, saddlecloths, halters, bridles, and curb bits.’
    • ‘The famous bay now heads for a life of retirement at the age of 17.’
    • ‘It was a bay, with a liver chestnut body and gleaming black legs.’
    • ‘After landing in Japan, the seven-year-old bay was transported by van to Shiroi Quarantine Facility.’
    • ‘Elza hopped off the bay's back and hitched the two horses to the nearest tree.’
    • ‘Like any event where you get a mixture of breeds, there were paints, sorrels, bays and palominos… almost anything you could want!’
    • ‘The stable hand saddled a bay for me; she was beautiful and well behaved.’
    • ‘I went by the stables and pet Hildi, my horse; she was a golden bay.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French bai, from Latin badius.

Pronunciation:

bay

/beɪ/

Main definitions of bay in English

: bay1bay2bay3bay4bay5

bay5

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 (of a dog, especially a large one) bark or howl loudly.

    ‘the dogs bayed’
    ‘a jackal baying at the moon’
    • ‘Sounds were magnified a thousand fold so that the cats fight sounded like a full out war and the hounds baying at the moon sounded like fog horns on the steam ships.’
    • ‘Quickly the pack of hounds caught a scent, and hurried to the chase, baying so loudly that the rocks and cliffs rang.’
    • ‘Sara was at the door; she let out the dog, who came leaping and prancing down the walk baying hello.’
    • ‘The police dogs are baying to be released as the newly arrived officers are gathered in for the briefing.’
    • ‘On a winter's night in the deserts of northern Mexico one might expect to hear the chilling cries of coyotes or solitary wolf baying at the moon.’
    • ‘The mens' horns sounded in triumph, and the master of hounds set his dogs baying.’
    • ‘A little man with splendid white hair imitated a cur baying at the moon.’
    • ‘They hadn't gone more than another half click before they heard dogs baying in the distance.’
    • ‘She heard a wolf baying at the moon, and another wolf answering.’
    • ‘The dogs of the SWAT team were baying furiously, eager to be let loose at their victim.’
    • ‘Knowing that she was still in danger if she remained here, I lifted her tenderly and took flight, dogs baying at our heels as I loped along darkened paths.’
    howl, bark, yelp, yap, cry, growl, bellow, roar, clamour, snarl
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1(of a group of people) shout loudly, typically to demand something.
      ‘the crowd bayed for an encore’
      • ‘These days, the police and social services would be hammering at the gates, while a baying hate mob stormed the place with burning torches.’
      • ‘Ring leaders urged the baying mob, which included women and children as young as seven, to stand their ground despite facing mounted police galloping towards them at full charge.’
      • ‘All it took was one tiny violation and the adoring crowds turned into a baying mob.’
      • ‘She walked from her offices at MTV into Times Square and people shrieked her name and bayed for her autograph.’
      • ‘With this in mind, many actors ensure they're armed with some amusing anecdotes from the shoot to toss to the baying press pack.’
      • ‘If opposition deputies find that the junior minister had indeed leaked the news before the budget announcement they would no doubt be baying for his resignation.’
      • ‘In other words, contrary to the baying press things are still in good health on British mainstream television.’
      • ‘Hundreds of police officers took to the streets to tackle the baying mob, only to be pelted by petrol bombs and missiles.’
      • ‘Nobody asks that referees be pursued into the shower by baying journalists or angry members of the public.’
      • ‘In what is now an undeclared civil war, west coast fishermen's leaders, politicians and the local media are baying for new measures to be put in place to protect the fishery for those who have no other livelihood.’
      • ‘The fans bayed for the final whistle as the scoreboard clock showed extra time and were further incensed when Kaplan awarded Australia the penalty, which Eales converted for the winner.’
      • ‘This is cultural chaos and online anarchy in the service of the baying mob.’
      • ‘A baying mob of 200 fans mercilessly called for Van de Velde to quit immediately after this third defeat in a row which ended the Wolves' lingering top five hopes.’
      • ‘One night, in 1976, he was forced to spring from bed to defend his family at gunpoint when a baying republican mob broke into his home.’
      • ‘The home crowd bayed for more goals and their pleas were answered in the dying minutes of the game.’
      • ‘This comment had some claiming political interference and baying for her dismissal.’
      • ‘They play for a very punk rock 40 minutes, although an ego like Borrell's is never going to resist an encore when there's a crowd baying for one, and they throw everything into it and at each other.’
      • ‘But they said they were finally forced to quit after being confronted by a baying mob who warned them they would be killed if they did not leave.’
      • ‘A baying mob of youths hurled abuse at firefighters as they battled a suspicious rubbish fire threatening to engulf an electricity pylon.’
      • ‘Maybe this is the only way we can convince those baying hordes of people demanding that we partake in society's social whirl, that all we really want is our own companionship for a while.’
    2. 1.2archaic [with object]Bay at.
      ‘a pack of wolves baying the moon’
      • ‘Women, we might as well be dogs baying the moon as petitioners without the right to vote!’
      • ‘I think they were baying the moon, as do their cultured relatives the dogs.’

noun

  • [in singular] The sound of baying.

    ‘the bloodhounds' heavy bay’
    • ‘Some parts of Lovecraft's work as in the first few lines of, "He," are as prosaic as a fog horn, and as lyrical as a wolf's bay.’
    baying, howl, howling, bark, barking, cry, crying, growl, growling, bellow, bellowing, roar, roaring, clamour, clamouring
    ululation
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • at bay

    • Forced to face or confront one's attackers or pursuers; cornered.

      ‘he felt at bay, like a very dim minister facing a hostile House’
      • ‘An eye-for-an-eye has been the recognisable policy of a small state at bay.’
      at a distance, away, off, aside, at arm's length
      View synonyms
  • bay for blood

    • Demand punishment or retribution.

      ‘the press is baying for blood’
      • ‘It is these ordinary people who are now baying for his blood.’
      • ‘With quarter of an hour left I was baying for his blood.’
      • ‘I remember the first one, what he did, and it was almost the same except instead of having 14 people in the room he had a thousand people in the room who were effectively baying for blood.’
      • ‘But the opposition and the press, having at last caught up, were baying for blood.’
      • ‘The cable stations, from CNN to Fox, are literally baying for blood and demanding the marines go into the city.’
      • ‘Their reputations have been dragged through the mud in the past - usually tethered to the back of a speeding cart with torch wielding villagers baying for their blood - but even warty-faced old hags can only take so much.’
      • ‘Milutinovic has shaken off many of the critics who bayed for his blood after sloppy performances and infighting just before the World Cup qualifiers.’
      • ‘As Formula One fans bay for his blood after he axed the British Grand Prix, Bernie Ecclestone, the boss of F1 has a new problem on his doorstep.’
      • ‘Pity ought to be our response to his manifold self-inflicted misfortunes; instead the mob is baying for his blood.’
      • ‘It's more likely that I'll be chased around the hospital site by people baying for my blood.’
  • bring someone/thing to bay

    • Trap or corner a person or animal being hunted or chased.

      ‘the Athenians were brought to bay between the streams’
      • ‘Capitalism has neither conscience nor morality when it is brought to bay.’
      • ‘Beneath a stand of trees, on a rise of land above the chateau, is a stone table and benches where Louis would breakfast while his hounds and huntsmen searched out a likely scent in the meadows below or brought some stag to bay.’
      • ‘Mounted on their camels, they use dogs to bring their quarry to bay, and sharpened poles as lances.’
  • hold (or keep) someone/thing at bay

    • Prevent someone or something from approaching or having an effect.

      ‘drugs were keeping severe pain at bay’
      • ‘Half-a-dozen campfires were lit for the purpose of beating the chill and to keep wild animals at bay, while the forest personnel stood guard.’
      • ‘There is now the possibility that the fence built to keep the risk of attack at bay will never open on the grounds that it is just too risky.’
      • ‘Prison chiefs have tightened security after an inmate climbed onto a roof and kept guards at bay for five-and-a-half hours.’
      • ‘So long as the network is adequately protected, hackers can be kept at bay and prevented from stealing the personal information required to commit frauds in your name.’
      • ‘Officers believe the hotline will play a major role in the fight to keep these dealers at bay.’
      • ‘They were able to block the doors and hold looters at bay.’
      • ‘Researchers at the University of Edinburgh now aim to discover if an aspirin a day really does keep heart attacks at bay.’
      • ‘During the building of the Towers engineers had to hold back the old river muck and keep it at bay to prevent the collapse of the unstable grounds during excavation.’
      • ‘At the same time air vents were blocked with cloth to keep the cold winds at bay.’
      • ‘The movie was only finished early last month and reviewers have been kept at bay, to prevent illegal copies of the film being made and to ensure that it's release will be accompanied by an unprecedented blast of publicity.’
  • stand at bay

    • Turn to face one's pursuers.

      ‘she will be doomed to stand at bay’
      • ‘Deer stand at bay as an active defence strategy - not because they are run to exhaustion.’
      • ‘Leaving our panting steeds, we made a simultaneous rush on the boar, as he stood at bay in the water.’
      • ‘They could continue to exercise but again there is a relationship between behavioural responses, they turn and stand at bay as a defensive posture.’
      • ‘A brilliant act of daring with plenty of spectators and high hope of success is one thing; but to stand at bay when all chance seems gone, determined to die hard and never give in, is quite another.’
      • ‘Sometimes we had to stand at bay but the engagement never lasted more than a few hours.’

Origin

Middle English (as a noun): from Old French ( a)bai (noun), ( a)baiier (verb) to bark, of imitative origin.

Pronunciation:

bay

/beɪ/