Main definitions of batty in English

: batty1batty2

batty1

adjective

British
informal
  • Mad; insane.

    ‘you'll drive me batty!’
    • ‘Where's the batty professor gotten himself now?’
    • ‘You can drive yourself batty trying to figure out what every color is supposed to symbolize.’
    • ‘The girl looked at the window of the Drexler place, and shied off as the old, batty pair of eyes came down upon her.’
    • ‘I'm trying to be patient, I'm trying to be understanding, but all I'm ending up with is batty.’
    • ‘And now the world and his wife are wondering what the batty couple will name their next child.’
    • ‘He was trying to be friendly in a slightly heavy-handed fashion, and possibly had a couple of marbles missing from his collection, but was more like a slightly batty grandfather, than a menace.’
    • ‘In Mr. Kirsch's telling, it is more like Mr. Holifield has interestingly presented the deranged notes that a batty aunt in the attic kept in a shoebox.’
    • ‘To think that she has twice come close to being married, and especially to being married to young and attractive Fortune - she must be quite batty to turn away from that.’
    • ‘But he admits being batty about the phenomenon.’
    • ‘We could guffaw at the antics of a batty learner-driver, a camp airport official or flummoxed hotel workers.’
    • ‘I expected her to be all talked out on the subject of her great love; in fact she mentions Gainsbourg first, then evokes his memory repeatedly over the next hour, in which she's charming, if somewhat batty, company.’
    • ‘When I'm old and grey and either too batty, too jaded or simply too wise to care much about social propriety and the trivia of a speeding fine, I will be buying myself a Micra and the A-roads will be mine.’
    • ‘Julie, the wonderfully batty nurse, is back on duty.’
    • ‘Her impulsive, easily outraged father has removed all his children from school to be home-educated, and her mother, a batty inventor, is usually ensconced among collections of not-quite-perfected gadgets.’
    • ‘I looked at the audience and thought: how come it is always these people, or their fathers, grandfathers, cousins and batty aunts, who find their way into clubs?’
    • ‘Faint, hard-to-read indicators and an obtuse, non-intuitive interface drove me batty trying to move from one screen to the next.’
    • ‘Through her journal we learn that her father is a mildly batty author who is resented by the family for relocating them to a remote castle in the British countryside years before.’
    • ‘The school really is batty giving people like you a second look for their scholastic achievement.’
    • ‘It drives me absolutely batty when I thank a waiter, sales clerk, or other paid service person and the response is ‘no problem.’’
    • ‘Don Quijote's pretense at madness and further references to Mambrino's basin, is starting to convince Sancho that his master is indeed batty and he tells him so.’
    insane, mentally ill, certifiable, deranged, demented, of unsound mind, out of one's mind, not in one's right mind, sick in the head, not together, crazy, crazed, lunatic, non compos mentis, unbalanced, unhinged, unstable, disturbed, distracted, stark mad, manic, frenzied, raving, distraught, frantic, hysterical, delirious, psychotic, psychopathic, mad as a hatter, mad as a march hare, away with the fairies, foaming at the mouth
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 20th century: from bat + -y. Compare with bats.

Pronunciation:

batty

/ˈbati/

Main definitions of batty in English

: batty1batty2

batty2

noun

West indian
informal
  • A person's bottom.

    • ‘Shake your batty low, shake your batty high; don't ask me, who, where, when or why.’
    • ‘You're never far from a party and a sound system in Jamaica, whether you want to shake your batty to the latest dancehall mixes or sink rum punches at sundown.’
    • ‘You cannot just sit on your batty at home watching granada men and motors.’

Origin

1930s: representing a pronunciation of botty.

Pronunciation:

batty

/ˈbati/