Main definitions of batter in English

: batter1batter2batter3batter4

batter1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Strike repeatedly with hard blows.

    ‘a prisoner was battered to death with a table leg’
    • ‘A security guard was battered to death in a row with a gang of Kosovan teenagers, a court heard.’
    • ‘As we know now, she had been battered to death by her husband.’
    • ‘It is rumoured that Maxine is battered to death by Hillman after she stumbles across his wicked attempt to kill Emily, played by Eileen Derbyshire, so he can get his hands on her house.’
    • ‘She bashed and battered the pole for a long time until at last, with a scream, she slashed across the pole with a strength that she did not know she had.’
    • ‘When their cousin is battered to death and left on the moors for the crows, they stick together and refuse to co-operate with policeman Ben Cooper.’
    • ‘In the seventh and eighth rounds, Norton was beating and battering Ali all over the ring.’
    • ‘Her body was found at her home where she had been battered to death.’
    • ‘Blows batter him from all sides, and something pierces him deeply just above the hip.’
    • ‘Conversely, husbands who were having extramarital affairs also tended to batter their wives.’
    • ‘Traders shoo them away from their customers, and batter the children around the head if they become too persistent.’
    • ‘Indeed, it has been argued that in some cases where women kill a spouse or partner who has battered them, the elements of self-defence may be made out.’
    • ‘An armed robber who battered a security guard repeatedly with a stick was yesterday jailed for eight and a half years.’
    • ‘He was battered to death in his Islington home by his friend and companion, who then committed suicide.’
    • ‘A backpacker from Warminster has been battered to death while travelling across Thailand.’
    • ‘He writes that his mother was indeed a prostitute who abandoned him at the age of five and who was battered to death 37 years ago.’
    • ‘The teenager was battered to the ground twice by the gang in an apparently unprovoked attack.’
    • ‘Though I'd have to make sure I killed him with the first blow, because he'd batter me senseless if he got a chance to retaliate.’
    • ‘It had been hard and she had been battered, but she came thru it whole and complete.’
    • ‘More than one-third are battered repeatedly every year.’
    • ‘The victim, understood to be an Irishman in his 40s, was battered to death shortly before midnight on Monday.’
    pummel, pound, rain blows on, buffet, belabour, thrash, beat up, abuse
    damage, injure, hurt, harm, impair, mar, spoil
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Subject (one's spouse, partner, or child) to repeated violence and assault.
      ‘outrage at wife-battering and child abuse’
      • ‘He suggests that in new cases when women go to the police and accuse their partner of battering them, the man will get thrown out of their property, pending an enquiry.’
      • ‘They're not afraid to discuss tough social topics like wife battering, bride burnings, child abuse or the fact that Indian girls have the highest suicide rate.’
      • ‘They pointed out that recently, because of deficient psychological adjustment after divorce, child battering and children's roaming have been aggravated in the province.’
      • ‘Women and children are sexually exploited when they are subjected to incest, rape, sexual harassment, battering, bride trafficking, pornography, and prostitution.’
      • ‘For five years little children have been subject to abuse, neglect and battering.’
      • ‘A Senior Government official in Nakonde has called on men to stop battering their wives and instead bring peace in their homes.’
      • ‘There is no dearth of cases of wife battering victimizing women who have made a mark in their professions.’
      • ‘A woman found dead in a suspected mercy killing had served time for battering a 22-month-old child.’
      • ‘It is very sad that even at this stage of supposed development there are cases such as wife battering.’
      • ‘Raising consciousness about violence against women, rape and battering became prosecuted crimes.’
      • ‘Under the plans, men and women would be automatically added to a new domestic violence register, available to the police, NHS and social services, if they were convicted of battering their partners.’
      • ‘A group dedicated to helping husbands stop battering their wives has re-opened its helpline.’
      • ‘I spend most of my academic life researching the phenomenon of violence against women, specifically battering.’
      • ‘A cook has been charged with battering his wife to death during an argument in which he accused her of infidelity.’
      • ‘Gender-linked violence, including rape and sexual assault, incest, wife battering, and sexual harassment, has generated intense research activity.’
      • ‘Actually it is concerned with Hamlet's mother: Hamlet's battering leaves her overwhelmed by a realization of her depravity.’
      • ‘Do all these cases of husband battering appear in court?’
    2. 1.2Censure, criticize, or defeat severely or thoroughly.
      ‘the film took a battering from critics’
      • ‘Heworth's push for promotion took a battering as National Conference League division two leaders Hunslet Warriors gave a great second half show to beat them 46-0.’
      • ‘When the Reserve Bank acted and lifted rates in March, consumer sentiment took a battering, falling 16.6 per cent.’
      • ‘At the same time executive salaries took a battering.’
      • ‘Blackpool's play-off hopes took a battering in a miserable midweek defeat at Bloomfield Road.’
      • ‘But its shares took a battering because rail was seen as something of a saviour at a time when other parts of the business were enduring tough trading conditions.’
      • ‘Some of her closest relationships, most notably with her son and her loyal, self-sacrificing assistant, took a battering.’
      • ‘Last night in Braehead, everyone's eardrums took a battering from the raucous, but well behaved crowd which almost filled the arena.’
      • ‘She had been on an upward curve, but had suddenly reached a plateau in her performances, and her confidence took a battering.’
      • ‘In July, the police response to incidents took a battering.’
      • ‘Last weekend the Beattie Government took a battering at the polls, losing two crucial by-elections.’
      • ‘The Australian sharemarket took a battering today, falling almost one per cent, as the price of crude oil surged to a new record high.’
      • ‘However, his smug self-confidence took a battering when Tudor won the Rounders.’
      • ‘But those hopes took a battering whenever Dwyer's name popped up.’
      • ‘The panel took a battering with players out of the country during the league campaign but, so far, everyone has shown strongly in the bid to land a third IFC in ten years.’
      • ‘Our complacence over sexual abuse took a battering when Mira Nair's ‘Monsoon Wedding’ won the 2002 Venice Golden Lion.’
      • ‘Care home provision in North Yorkshire took a battering today when another two nursing homes announced they were to close their doors.’
      • ‘Hong Kong-listed mainland car stocks took a battering yesterday as investors reacted negatively to reports that mainland car owners had defaulted on billions of yuan worth of loans last year.’
      • ‘Australia hopes to attack England's spirit, which took a battering after the first Test defeat.’
      • ‘Jamie Dobb endured a disappointing race at the French Grand Prix as his World 250 cc Motorcross Championship hopes took a battering.’
      • ‘Tech and telecom stocks took a battering yesterday as the FTSE - 100 Index closed nearly 80 points down.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French batre to beat (from Latin battuere) + -er.

Pronunciation:

batter

/ˈbatə/

Main definitions of batter in English

: batter1batter2batter3batter4

batter2

noun

  • 1[mass noun] A semi-liquid mixture of flour, egg, and milk or water, used for making pancakes or for coating food before frying.

    [as modifier] ‘pancake batter’
    [count noun] ‘a batter thin enough to be poured’
    • ‘When mixed, it should be the consistency of pancake batter.’
    • ‘I thought that using pancake batter would be a good substitute for ‘pastry dough,’ but boy oh boy was I wrong.’
    • ‘I'm sure we could live on canned green beans, water, and pancake batter for the rest of our lives, but it isn't a good policy.’
    • ‘Add the flour mixture to the batter in three or four additions, and stir until just combined.’
    • ‘Mix wheat germ into pancake batter, oatmeal and home-baked goods, or use in soups and stews to impart a nutty flavor and add nutrients.’
    • ‘Batter should have consistency of thin pancake batter.’
    • ‘Make the tempura batter by adding ice water, whisking in until it reaches the correct consistency and add sesame seeds and some of the coriander.’
    • ‘The last thing that such oily flesh requires is a coating of batter.’
    • ‘The simplest way to make pancakes is still a favourite - a basic pancake batter made with three ingredients flour, eggs and milk.’
    • ‘He discovered many other delicacies involving Yorkshire pudding batter when he researched the simple concoction of flour, milk and egg for his first volume.’
    • ‘She did not hear him come in as she stirred batter to make pancakes.’
    • ‘Dip the sardines into the rice flour batter to coat, place them in the fryer, and cook until golden brown, about two minutes.’
    • ‘I sighed and Sara just went on stirring her pancake batter.’
    • ‘Make the Yorkshire pudding batter by placing the flour and all the eggs into a bowl with some salt and pepper.’
    • ‘In its simplest form this is a flour and water batter, providing food and moisture for the yeast spores which the baker hopes are present.’
    • ‘He frowned, turning to her, the spatula in his hands dripping small amounts of pancake batter.’
    • ‘The batter is quite a bit thinner than that of pancakes, and the trick is to use its fineness to the finished crepe's advantage.’
    • ‘The pancake batter is the nice homely type we all know and love.’
    • ‘Pour enough batter to lightly coat the bottom of the pan.’
    • ‘For the tempura batter, in a medium bowl, combine the flour, tapioca starch, salt, and sugar and stir well to combine.’
    1. 1.1North American A mixture of ingredients for a cake.
      • ‘Aim to create the consistency of thick cake batter and do not overly thin the mixture.’
      • ‘Add orange/raisin mixture to cake batter and mix well.’
      • ‘Pour the batter into the prepared cake pans, dividing evenly between the two.’
      • ‘Pour the finished batter into the cake tin and bake for approximately 1 hour or until the cake becomes firm and springy to the touch, when lightly pressed in the middle.’
      • ‘I chopped up a good amount of fresh mint leaves together with some rosemary needles and simply added them to the cake batter.’
      • ‘Amari began mixing the cake batter around, sending tiny flecks of the mixture all over the kitchen.’
      • ‘Remember, the cake batter is only as good as the ingredients.’
      • ‘Combine the dry and the wet and pour the batter into the cake pans.’
      • ‘Pour the batter into a cake tin and bake for 35 mins.’
      • ‘In creamed cakes an airy batter of fat, sugar, and egg is mixed with flour at the last minute, allowing minimal time for protein and starch in the flour to cross-link.’
      • ‘Pour batter into cake pans and bake about 30 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean.’
      • ‘Whisk until all the liquid is mixed into the dry ingredients and the batter is smooth.’
      • ‘Any food that contains uncooked eggs, such as homemade cookie dough, cake batter or eggnog, can pose a hazard.’
      • ‘Here's Lisa spreading the finished batter into the cake pans.’
      • ‘I was up to my elbows in cake batter when I glanced at the clock.’
      • ‘I smiled a sickly half smile, and then stirred some baking powder into the sponge cake batter.’
      • ‘I stop stirring the cake batter and try to get the phone from my cousin, but she's already handing it to Aunt Malka.’
      • ‘As children first introduced to the mysteries of the kitchen, we learn how to blend the batter of a cake or flatten the dough of a pie.’
      • ‘The consistency should be that of a very thick cake batter.’
      • ‘Fold the melted chocolate into the cake batter; fold in the flour and the almonds.’
  • 2Printing
    A damaged area of metal type or a printing block.

    • ‘This printing has a cancel title-page dated 1912 instead of 1911, and is the first English printing to incorporate several text corrections as described by Garrison, but is otherwise identical to the Scribners issues of 1911, and shows the expected type batter in “wearily” on p. 135, line 21.’
    • ‘When there are uncorrected printer's errors, or errors that can be attributed to type batter, we have silently corrected them, primarily so that they do not impede electronic searches of our transcribed texts.’
    • ‘Like the readings which are defective in all examined copies but were apparently correct at one time, some of these variants may be attributed to type batter.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French bateure the action of beating, from batre to beat.

Pronunciation:

batter

/ˈbatə/

Main definitions of batter in English

: batter1batter2batter3batter4

batter3

noun

  • (in various sports, especially baseball) a player who is batting.

    • ‘Major league batters strike out more frequently in today's game of power hitting and tape-measure home runs’
    • ‘The shortstop tags out the batter / runner before he can return safely to the base.’
    • ‘In baseball, a batter can expect to get as many as four or five chances to hit in a single game: he only needs to take one of these for the hitting streak to continue.’
    • ‘The key would be retiring Robinson, the leadoff batter in the inning.’
    • ‘With one out in the ninth and the strikeout total at 25, the next batter hit a high foul ball between first and home plate.’
    • ‘He concluded that on-base percentage was a better way to quantify a batter's success than batting average.’
    • ‘A reader in the January issue asked a question about a runner on third tagging up when a batter hits a fly ball to the outfield.’
    • ‘The next three batters went out on ground balls and the Sox won, 11-10.’
    • ‘No different than a pitcher in baseball, when a batter comes up he's got his notebook about what kind of pitch this guy likes to hit and what kind of pitch he doesn't like to hit.’
    • ‘The next batter, Adam Shorts, popped a foul ball down the first base line.’
    • ‘He will keep fielders on their toes by getting the batter to hit ground balls.’
    • ‘The batter hit a lazy fly ball which the shortstop easily reached just behind second base.’
    • ‘Sometimes in baseball a batter decides to take a pitch.’
    • ‘Going both ways is a good thing with regard to two-way streets, switch-hitting batters and special football players.’
    • ‘He began impressively, striking out his first batter with a fastball that got up to 98 mph.’
    • ‘If I tossed a ball in the air when I was in the bullpen, it signaled a fastball for the batter.’
    • ‘With a runner on third base and less than two outs, the batter hits a fly ball to the outfield.’
    • ‘Chuck Finley struck out four batters in one inning three times, twice with the Angels and once with the Indians.’
    • ‘Ross, in his book, explains the most common baseball statistics for evaluating batters.’
    • ‘He was a first baseman and a left-handed batter and I admired the way he played.’

Pronunciation:

batter

/ˈbatə/

Main definitions of batter in English

: batter1batter2batter3batter4

batter4

noun

  • A gradual backwards slope in a wall or similar structure.

    ‘the batter is an inch in for every foot of height’
    • ‘They can be constructed of single or multiple depths of block and the maximum wall height of a single depth wall is directly proportional to its weight, width, batter, soil condition, and site geometry.’
    • ‘The 60-kilometre canal would have been as wide as this building, including the batter.’
    • ‘It must be set on a compacted stone base and each layer is connected to the next by clips that automatically give each wall the proper batter.’
    • ‘The defensive wall was of fine ashlar masonry with a pronounced batter.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • (of a wall) have a receding slope.

    • ‘All were in outline truncated cones—that is, the outer face of the wall "batters" or inclines inwards.’
    • ‘It becomes easier with height as the wall batters in, and the gap between the face of the wall and the corner of the pillar increases.’
    • ‘The surrounding wall batters outward from bottom to top.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (as a verb): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

batter

/ˈbatə/