Main definitions of basque in English

: basque1Basque2

basque1

Pronunciation /bask//bɑːsk/

noun

  • A close-fitting bodice extending from the shoulders to the waist and typically with a short continuation below waist level.

    • ‘But if you want weird you should have seen the group of ladies and gents all dressed in black, some wearing basques and other risqué clothing.’
    • ‘Even sitting at home, she's in an extravagant outfit of stockings, suspenders, basque, feather boa, everything.’
    • ‘The girl wore a see through black basque and back combed bleached hair.’
    • ‘Inside the theatre foyer, I was greeted by two young women dressed for the part - one in a French maid's outfit and the other in a basque.’
    • ‘If you are blessed with a curvy, hourglass figure, then a corset or basque will certainly make the most of your assets.’
    • ‘"She loves the customised T-shirts and the Kyri basques," says the shop owner, stepping up to the rail and removing an orange basque.’
    • ‘We finally got the basque back and delivered it to the bride-to-be's room.’
    • ‘In the production, at the theatre, she appeared briefly in stockings and a basque, in which she was pictured for publicity shots.’
    • ‘In the meantime, I will be taking my new black and pink see-thru basque with me.’
    • ‘And take a look at supportive underwear; there are briefs which help hold your tummy in, and if you're really keen, boned basques which squeeze you in.’
    • ‘Just how ridiculous do we look with a basque over our jeans?’
    • ‘The sexy star wore a tight-fitting basque designed by top corset-maker.’
    • ‘Beside this, an armchair was covered in a wild outgrowth of clothes: summer dresses; stockings; suspenders; a garter belt; an ornate white basque that she had worn for him one night.’
    • ‘He has no fetish for stiletto heels and stocking tops, and there are no women dressed only in basques.’
    • ‘He had hired a crazy wig and wore a slinky black dress, black stockings and a basque.’
    • ‘She was referring to the picture of me dressed in a basque, stockings, suspenders and a thong that had been circulating on everybody's mobile phone.’
    • ‘Shops all over the city have been ransacked for boots, basques, garters, stockings and suspenders and other distinctly racy garments by theatre-goers determined to join in the spirit of the gender-bending theatrical phenomenon.’
    • ‘The shots of her grinning like a lunatic on the beach, or posed in stockings and basque, were not enough.’
    • ‘Even now, she is probably parading round your living room in a rubber basque.’
    • ‘That music has persuaded a huge range of actors and actresses to don basques and fishnets over the years.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from Basque, referring to Basque dress.

Pronunciation

basque

/bask//bɑːsk/

Main definitions of basque in English

: basque1Basque2

Basque2

Pronunciation /bask//bɑːsk/

noun

  • 1A member of a people living in the Basque Country of France and Spain. Culturally one of the most distinct groups in Europe, the Basques were largely independent until the 19th century. The Basque separatist movement ETA is carrying on an armed struggle against the Spanish government.

    • ‘One remarkable feature of the indigenous culture is that there are striking and inexplicable resemblances between the language and that of the Basques in Europe.’
    • ‘French and Spanish fishermen soon joined the Basques.’
    • ‘The distinctive Basque culture was recognized by the rulers of Castile until the nineteenth century, when the Basques ' privileges were removed by the Spanish court.’
    • ‘Although the Basque country is divided between France and Spain, the Basques have maintained an identity separate from both states.’
    • ‘In recent years, Basques in both Spain and France have promoted - with some success - the use of their traditional language.’
    • ‘They have been joined by three other Spanish groups, the Basques, Galicians and Valencians who also want their languages officially recognised.’
    • ‘The Basques are a distinct community with a unique language in what is today northern Spain and south west France.’
    • ‘The Basques, Europe's oldest surviving group, are also the first identifiable people of the peninsula.’
    • ‘Due to centuries of social struggle, Basques now live in relative autonomy.’
    • ‘During the period of Spanish colonization, Basques from Spain had often taken administrative posts overseas.’
  • 2mass noun The language of the Basques, which is not known to be related to any other language. It has about 1 million speakers.

    • ‘Whatever their mother tongue: Spanish, Hindi, Finnish, Basque, Walpiri, Quechua, babies acquire it long before they learn to read and write.’
    • ‘These languages include not only Dutch, German, and Scandinavian, Asian, and African languages, but less widely spoken languages such as Basque, Yiddish, and Greek.’
    • ‘With eight colleagues, he has just completed a large reference grammar of Basque, to be published shortly.’
    • ‘Etruscan was obviously not an Indo-European language and was unrelated to Basque.’
    • ‘But the majority prefer to speak Basque because it's easier for them.’

adjective

  • Relating to the Basques or their language.

    • ‘They sing and improvise in Euskera, the Basque language.’
    • ‘He was pleased to notice Basque symbols on the awning outside, but when we looked at the menu, we quickly noticed cuisine was more regional French and Spanish, with slight inflections of traditional dishes.’
    • ‘The Basque language is extremely difficult and complex.’
    • ‘In these simple clubs, whose name in the ancient Basque language means ‘corner’, attendance is by invitation only.’
    • ‘It is possible to listen to the music of many Basque composers, both contemporary and classical, and feel that the influence of the outside world has been paramount.’

Origin

From French, from Latin Vasco; compare with Gascon.

Pronunciation

Basque

/bask//bɑːsk/