Definition of barrister in English:

barrister

(also barrister-at-law)

noun

British
  • A person called to the bar and entitled to practise as an advocate, particularly in the higher courts.

    Compare with attorney, solicitor
    • ‘So both barristers and judges have to be very careful that they deal with juries in a way that helps them to deal with the subject matter.’
    • ‘There is no reason to fear a flood of negligence suits against barristers.’
    • ‘So what is it about politics that attracts so many solicitors and barristers?’
    • ‘Should you be able to sue barristers and solicitors who are negligent in acting for you in a legal case?’
    • ‘You are the first barrister without a solicitor that has ever appeared in front of me.’
    • ‘They may be inclined to agree to suggestions put to them by others, or, indeed, by barristers in the courtroom.’
    • ‘If there is anybody who knows an honest barrister or solicitor that can help me with my defence and so, please let me know.’
    • ‘This is not dissimilar to charges of professional misconduct as a barrister or solicitor.’
    • ‘The Group can also receive payments from panel solicitors, barristers and mobile doctors.’
    • ‘The defendants are represented by a defence team of three barristers and two solicitors.’
    • ‘A decision has been taken that the judge Mr Justice Hooper and barristers are not to wear wigs or gowns.’
    • ‘Instead I started by approaching solicitors and barristers known to me to seek access to their clients.’
    • ‘The barristers, or advocates, wear the garb they would wear in courts in their own homeland.’
    • ‘He was grilled in the witness box for 15 days by the prosecution and defence barristers on the issue.’
    • ‘Francis had used five different firms of solicitors and six defence barristers.’
    • ‘The two sides of the profession, barristers and solicitors, continue to exist, and both have expanded numerically.’
    • ‘The BBC reports that the judge and the barristers removed their wigs and gowns to make the courtroom less intimidating.’
    • ‘A further 50 questionnaires were sent to commercial and construction barristers.’
    • ‘We contend there is available insurance for barristers and solicitor advocates.’
    • ‘They also said there should be reviews of the codes of conduct for barristers and solicitors.’
    advocate, lawyer, professional pleader, counsel, queen's counsel, qc, defending counsel, prosecuting counsel
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from the noun bar, perhaps on the pattern of minister.

Pronunciation

barrister

/ˈbarɪstə/