Definition of barrier in English:

barrier

noun

  • 1A fence or other obstacle that prevents movement or access.

    ‘the mountain barrier between Norway and Sweden’
    • ‘As helicopters buzzed overhead, army engineers erected concrete barriers and razor wire fences in the fields off Drumcree Road.’
    • ‘However, he told council he would like to protect the fence with barriers, to prevent vehicle operators from accidentally running into the fence.’
    • ‘A uniformed cop stands next to the boy and both are enclosed in a space fenced off with four-foot-high barriers.’
    • ‘Special thanks also to Noel Kenny and Cecil Carter for the sound system, Andrew Broderick for organising the power and to Rent a Fence for providing the barriers.’
    • ‘The buried debris then acts as a physical barrier to the movement of water upward and downward.’
    • ‘The mountains provided a natural barrier to allow the settlers to build their own eco-system.’
    • ‘Roads passing the hotel will be blocked, local people issued with photographic identity cards and a five-mile steel fence with a second barrier inside the grounds will cordon off the hotel itself.’
    • ‘A bulldozer blade would be similarly effective today, for use in clearing rabble and barriers during urban movement.’
    • ‘In the western world, the sea has come to be regarded as a barrier, restricting our movements.’
    • ‘They weren't there to keep me away from, Heaven forbid, a Democrat or a protester; those folks were kept safely behind rings of fences and concrete barriers.’
    • ‘The only barrier is to the movement of cars onto the streetcar tracks.’
    • ‘Over the past year their government has set about establishing that separation unilaterally by the construction of a serpentine course of fences, barriers, walls.’
    • ‘They were in talks with the council to replace a wooden fence with a barrier but were told last week it would never happen.’
    • ‘The only real injury that I suffered was when I wrenched my knee jumping down from the barrier fence getting out of the ring.’
    • ‘As security fences and barriers went up, manholes were welded shut and hotels and offices swept by teams of officials.’
    • ‘The tahsildar had to intervene and put up a barrier blocking the movement of people and vehicles.’
    • ‘Summit delegates will hold their air conditioned talks there behind police lines, wire fences, concrete barriers and the sound of percussion grenades fired at protesters.’
    • ‘The security perimeter around the missions of the UK, the US and Turkey was widened and new fences and barriers were installed.’
    • ‘The Oceanlab team discovered that the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is a barrier to the movement of deep-sea fish between the east and west Atlantic Ocean.’
    • ‘It's one thing to put up a security fence, a barrier that is clearly on your property, the dividing line, so to speak, in order to protect yourself.’
    fence, railing, barricade, hurdle, bar, blockade, roadblock
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    1. 1.1British A gate at a car park or railway station that controls access by being raised or lowered.
      • ‘Ticket barriers at stations slow down passenger flow, but the determined non-payer can still vault over them, or sneak through behind a legitimate ticketholder.’
      • ‘You see, they've installed these ticket barriers at Oxford station and today was supposed to be the day upon which these came into use.’
      • ‘He leapt over station barriers and jumped on the tube.’
      • ‘She also says that barrier controlled car parks have to be manned at all times so staff can let disabled people out.’
      • ‘The train is late and there begins a tiny shuffling, like a re-focusing of the group, as we all look up the tracks where the barriers are still raised and the individual traffic is crossing.’
      • ‘The police also raised the barriers at the Riom tollgate in anticipation of the satanic Vel Satis making a break for freedom.’
      • ‘They were finally shifted after the council dug trenches and police escorted the caravans and vehicles off the car park, installing barriers in their wake.’
      • ‘Traffic was controlled and barriers put up by the council to keep pedestrians safe and form a protected walkway on the road.’
      • ‘The extra parking revenue will help pay for a new pay station system instead of putting coins in the barrier to leave the car park.’
      • ‘Road-users were alarmed when the Drypool Bridge started to open without the usual warning signals or barriers being lowered’
      • ‘Think Pret a Manger; think bendy buses; think automatic ticket barriers at Charing Cross station.’
      • ‘Many train stations now have automatic barriers that only allow ticket holders onto the platform.’
      • ‘Last February's disaster exposed the inadequacy of barriers dividing road and railway.’
      • ‘Automatic barriers at the village railway station were controlled by rail staff during the emergency.’
      • ‘Nurses at Wallsend Aged Care Facility have voted to take industrial action if work commences to build barriers or gates to car parking areas.’
      • ‘An investigation has been launched after a minibus full of passengers went through the barriers at Manningtree railway station - just seconds before a train was due to arrive.’
      • ‘I had been to the supermarket, which has a car-park incorporating barriers and tickets.’
      • ‘At other times, the barriers will control access and there will be a Euro2-exit charge.’
      • ‘The boss of a supermarket is to put barriers across its car park to keep out car cruisers who use it as a meeting place.’
      • ‘Instead he panicked, jumping over the station's ticket barriers and running down to a train where he was shot.’
      wicket, wicket gate, lychgate, five-barred gate, turnstile
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    2. 1.2 A circumstance or obstacle that keeps people or things apart or prevents communication or progress.
      ‘a language barrier’
      ‘the cultural barriers to economic growth’
      • ‘How far and how quickly to tear down barriers to world farm trade was a key topic of the discussions, which showed countries were still widely split on the issue.’
      • ‘Through lobbying government, educational workshops, videos and programs, they are working together to remove barriers to women in trades.’
      • ‘With visionaries like this leading the charge, it's hard to conceive of any barriers a hip-hop movement can't break.’
      • ‘The language barrier prevented direct access to the sources of supply of Chinese goods and to their final customers.’
      • ‘A helpful part of this section is an explicit description outlining how the program overcame obstacles and barriers to implementation.’
      • ‘But the remaining barriers to completely liberalized trade lend themselves to be very focused defensive positions.’
      • ‘The Department of Social Development is mandated with break down barriers to equality of opportunity for Canadians.’
      • ‘As for the other subject, elimination of trade barriers to environmental goods and services will facilitate both the expansion of trade and protection of the environment.’
      • ‘Ironically, those people who make the greatest demands on the healthcare system are those facing the greatest barriers to using online communication tools.’
      • ‘Sometimes even the language barrier cannot keep hypocrites apart.’
      • ‘For decades, the women's movement has challenged the barriers created in part by the dichotomies of female vs. male.’
      • ‘Thai TV, apart from the language barrier, has limited international appeal for these kinds of shows.’
      • ‘It would also be informative to track all hospital deaths and discover the obstacles and barriers to obtaining an autopsy.’
      • ‘But the 1970s also witnessed attempts to break down the racial barriers to economic opportunity and home ownership.’
      • ‘Patients with communication barriers (eg, language, hearing, speech) should be provided with an interpreter.’
      • ‘The large food retailers are going global, and as barriers to trade come down, the economics ate determining where the investment and trade take place.’
      • ‘The Europeans in this regards are the worst culprits, with more and more useless regulation being used as barriers to free trade.’
      • ‘What are the barriers to effective communication?’
      • ‘Though volunteers expected all kinds of difficulties the language barrier broke all of Shen's expectations, despite having a good command of English.’
      • ‘They are warm, but the language barrier keeps us apart.’
      obstacle, obstruction, hurdle, stumbling block, bar, block, impediment, hindrance
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Origin

Late Middle English (denoting a palisade or fortification defending an entrance): from Old French barriere, of unknown origin; related to barre.

Pronunciation

barrier

/ˈbarɪə/