Definition of barre in English:

barre

noun

  • 1A horizontal bar at waist level on which ballet dancers rest a hand for support during certain exercises.

    • ‘It also highlights a line of specialty items, such as ballet/stretching barres.’
    • ‘Unlike the other spaces, the Alice offered existing arts facilities, pre-equipped with dance floors, barres, and dressing rooms.’
    • ‘A ballet barre, for example, will get you ready for class by increasing your body temperature, suppleness and muscular control.’
    • ‘I only see barres and mirrors otherwise the ballet class looks rather bare…’
    • ‘They were not furniture to store dance bags, substitute barres, or places to park ashtrays, coffee cups, and soda cans.’
    • ‘Holding on to the barres, they moved into first position as the classical music started.’
    • ‘The exercises at the barre should prepare the students in specific ways for what she plans to present in the center.’
    • ‘All we have to do is pull up the carpets, lay the floors, and install barres and mirrors.’
    • ‘We also incorporated movements on the ballet barre to deeply stretch and target lower-body muscles.’
    • ‘Although she still gets to the gym by six every morning, works out on the machines, submits to a personal trainer and does a ballet barre, she no longer performs.’
    • ‘‘We can add a staff person, we get a faculty/company lounge, a 60’ x 40’ rehearsal space, three studios with sprung wood floors, new mirrors and barres, and space for on-site set, props, and costume storage.’’
    • ‘Still, dancers who are growing can offset injuries, to some degree, by adding floor barres and other body conditioning activities (such as Pilates) to increase strength.’
    • ‘For example, where you once saw a hand rail, see a ballet barre.’
    • ‘The photo shows the company doing their barre exercises.’
    • ‘The first act, art deco in style with black, white, and shining chrome, drew deserved applause when the mirrored walls and barres of the studio magically transformed into a gleaming train.’
    • ‘It's a mixed combination - classical, some modern and some jazz during the ballet barre.’
    • ‘The 19-year-old farm boy gave up the school gym's chin-up bar for the ballet barre in Nancy Hoggins's basement studio.’
    • ‘Marloth guides a series of intensive ballet barre exercises targeting the glutes, hips and thighs.’
    • ‘Stand holding the ballet barre with one hand, other hand at your waist.’
    • ‘Upon walking into the new and impressive complex of CPYB, I was surprised to see the excellent bodies of this young company walking in the hall and standing at the barres.’
  • 2[as modifier] Denoting a chord played using the barré method.

    • ‘Without them, the current crop of people claiming that rock is dead would probably still be trying to master barre chords.’
    • ‘The strings are far easier to push down, and I can now play barre chords at roughly the same speed as standard ones - I need to reposition my hand far less than before.’
    • ‘Rather than the standard barrage of bass and major barre chords, The Banshees offered a sound that was expansive and broad, yet no less claustrophobic and tense than any of their peers.’
    • ‘Hear how they all hit the drum and main barre chord at the same time in the build-up to ‘Bleed Blue’?’
    • ‘Marr offers nothing in the way of inventive guitar on Boomslang, a disc of barre chord throwaways you'd only expect from demos leaked by an unscrupulous associate.’

Origin

French.

Pronunciation:

barre

/bɑː/

Definition of barré in English:

barré

noun

Music
  • A method of playing a chord on the guitar or a similar instrument in which one finger is laid across all the strings at a particular fret.

    • ‘Here are the guitar chord charts for the basic guitar bar chords.’
    • ‘In this lesson, learn the basics of playing barre chords.’
    • ‘Barre chords are some of the mostly commonly used chords in music today.’

Origin

Late 19th century: French, literally barred, past participle of barrer.

Pronunciation:

barré

/bɑː/