Definition of baron in English:

baron

noun

  • 1A member of the lowest order of the British nobility. Baron is not used as a form of address, barons usually being referred to as ‘Lord’.

    • ‘At the funeral of Sir Joshua Reynolds in 1792, his body was borne to its resting place in St Paul's Cathedral by no less than three dukes, two marquesses, three earls, a viscount and a baron.’
    • ‘They all sat in a row, ranged according to their rank - kings and princes and dukes and earls and counts and barons and knights.’
    • ‘Henry III infuriated the barons by favouring foreigners over his own nobility.’
    • ‘Osyth's father, like any responsible aristocrat, consults his barons and arranges a suitable marriage for his daughter in accordance with their advice.’
    • ‘There is an evident resemblance between those barons who humiliated King John and the Whig magnates who invited William of Orange to usurp the throne.’
    • ‘John said he bought the titles to stop them falling in to foreign hands but would not be calling himself a baron.’
    • ‘In the center of the crowds of barons and knights under the king, was Johnathan Steevens.’
    • ‘At the college balls held each summer, the female companion of an Old Harrovian or Etonian would, in all probability, be the daughter of a baron or a duke, wrapped in the best silk.’
    • ‘Beyond that, there were 10,000 further titles of nobility (chiefs, chieftains, feudal barons and lairds), so that one Scot in 45 belonged to a noble house.’
    • ‘Dukes, duchesses, and barons made up the nobility, while the gentry consisted of knights and lords.’
    • ‘Marlborough prospered after Charles's victory over the Exclusionists in 1681, becoming a baron in the Scots peerage and colonel of the Royal Dragoons.’
    • ‘From the Magna Carta, English princes and barons made it clear to the royal crown that they had rights and this ideal became rooted in English custom.’
    • ‘Most of the barons and lords that went up against Arthur, and lost, ended up as his knights and governing heads.’
    • ‘Well, you see, the lords and barons swore their oath to make the king sign the Magna Carta at Bury St Edmunds.’
    • ‘They are being sold by Manorial Auctioneers of London on behalf of Lord Hothfield, a Cumbrian-based baron whose lineage stretches back to the middle ages.’
    • ‘The castles of the rebellious barons were razed and the nobles never challenged the duke's power again.’
    • ‘Her ancestors and relatives include a variety of dukes and barons and her maternal grandmother, Pandora Jones, was a god-daughter of the Duke of Windsor, formerly Edward VIII.’
    • ‘In the summer of 1306, bishops and barons and knights from all around England left their country manors and villages and journeyed to London.’
    • ‘The building had been around since the end of eighteenth century, planned by Lord Radcliffe, an English baron, who also was one of the first settlers of Greenwood.’
    • ‘Attendants of an earl, viscount or baron wore six rows of curls on state wigs and five on house wigs.’
    noble, nobleman, aristocrat, peer, lord
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    1. 1.1A member of a foreign nobility having a rank similar to that of a British baron.
      • ‘During this period, Malta was sold and resold to various feudal lords and barons and was dominated successively by the rulers of Swabia, Aquitaine, Aragon, Castile, and Spain.’
      • ‘What would you expect from a man whose ancestors were barons and dukes?’
      • ‘Even now I hardly care who it is whether it be a baron, a duke, an earl, or a lowly serf.’
      • ‘But as long as I was still a baroness and he a baron, we would have to convince everyone around us that life was perfect.’
      • ‘She was much sweeter than Selina, but still was not good with people (except rich princes, counts, dukes, and barons who came to court her).’
      • ‘He had to swear an oath to the baron, duke or earl, collect taxes when told to do so and provide soldiers from his land when they were needed.’
      • ‘But with the aid of a meddling foreign country, the rebellious and discontent barons of that upper part of the country succeeded in receding from Palasar to create their own kingdom.’
      • ‘The previous baron and baroness retired, and so a new baron and baroness were created by the king.’
      • ‘In the Papal States, the urban nobilities and feudal barons were subject, at least in name, to clerical officials appointed by their overlord the Pope.’
      • ‘‘There is one more thing, baron,’ the Advisor continued.’
      • ‘He pictured the rulers of the countries of the world meeting at the annual Nomari, and countless trembling presidents, kings, barons, and prime ministers declaring him Emperor of Lothos.’
      • ‘In short, the great barons ran Germany, or rather, each baron ran his particular corner of it.’
      • ‘I love going to court parties, but they are rarely formal, and are only for lesser barons and countesses, not official King's court balls.’
      • ‘Today's Kings pay off barons so that the barons will let them retain their thrones.’
      • ‘In pretending to be a baron and a countess, the pair pokes fun at rigid class structures and upper-crust, titled society.’
      • ‘The duke gave these back out to those loyal to him, transforming his barons into an aristocracy that was loyal to him.’
      • ‘‘Your Highness,’ the baron bowed to the duke, stepping aside.’
      • ‘Lords and ladies, dukes and barons, deep in conversation awaited the arrival of King Alexander.’
      • ‘The action centres around a 20-year-old woman who has two loves in life - diamonds and furs - and two lovers - a baron and a maharaja - who provide them.’
      • ‘She was also introduced to several lords, dukes and soon to be counts and barons, who were her age.’
    2. 1.2historical A person who held lands or property from the sovereign or a powerful overlord.
      • ‘Her parents were a baron and baroness and they had an older son as well that was to inherit the fief.’
      • ‘Knights and barons who had formerly controlled their own armies now took orders from the King.’
      • ‘Because they had sworn an oath to their lord, it was taken for granted that they had sworn a similar oath to the duke, earl or baron who owned that lord's property.’
      • ‘Some two hundred Norman barons took the land of over four thousand Anglo-Saxon lords, many of whom were exiled or killed.’
      • ‘He gave fiefs to Norman lords, trying to keep the Saxon barons from becoming too strong.’
  • 2[with modifier] An important or powerful person in a specified business or industry.

    ‘a press baron’
    • ‘In one delightful sequence, Bertie urges Churchill to form a new government, but asks that he leave newspaper baron Lord Beaverbrook out of it.’
    • ‘Since the stock market started to falter, more and more people have been having a go at becoming property barons.’
    • ‘The cattle barons dominated because without property rights the biggest operations gained all the competitive advantage.’
    • ‘All three categories, then - moguls, barons, and stars - existed before such modern mass media as film and radio; all three categories also exist more widely in business and other spheres.’
    • ‘It's known for hot tempers, drug lords and timber barons, none of which you want to mess with.’
    • ‘For instance the Irish linen industry arose because British textile barons successfully lobbied to kill the Irish cotton industry.’
    • ‘Sugar barons appoint their cronies or family members as chairpersons and directors.’
    • ‘He is contemptuous of press barons such as Lord Beaverbrook, who ran ‘the Daily Express merely for the purpose of making propaganda’.’
    • ‘A railroad baron then donated his property on Nob Hill for a diocesan cathedral.’
    • ‘The annihilator of the hereditary peers has succumbed to the trade union barons.’
    • ‘The New York Times reports that the pharmaceutical barons are the most powerful lobby in Washington.’
    • ‘Happy is the press baron whose political and business interests work hand in hand - or fist in glove.’
    • ‘Our heroine goes in search of the fabled Pandora's Box in order to stop a bio-weapons baron opening it up.’
    • ‘Such service has ensured the custom of royal families, business barons and assorted celebrities over decades of dealing with the rich and famous.’
    • ‘Somehow reorder the world so that drugs would be treated in the same way as fags - legal but educated against - and the drugs lords and narcotics barons would lose their power.’
    • ‘All the British press barons have big investments in the United States.’
    • ‘Jay Gould, the railroad baron, ordered sets of photographs and a Gerome album from Knoedler.’
    • ‘But in February 2004, newspaper baron Lord Conrad Black of Crossharbour received an unusually explicit judicial whipping.’
    • ‘Of course the British and the mining barons didn't want to use these materials, and people like Milner didn't want the prefabricated look, so the answer was an architect who could appreciate what was needed.’
    • ‘British and American media barons battled it out, with television broadcasting and production representing the modern Plains of Abraham and the Yanks acting as unrepentant victors.’
    magnate, tycoon, mogul, captain of industry, nabob, grandee, mandarin
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Origin

Middle English: from Old French, from medieval Latin baro, baron- man, warrior, probably of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation:

baron

/ˈbar(ə)n/