Definition of barometer in English:

barometer

noun

  • 1An instrument measuring atmospheric pressure, used especially in forecasting the weather and determining altitude.

    • ‘The atmospheric pressure on each experimental day was recorded using a barometer.’
    • ‘In Frémont's time the connection between weather events and changes in local air pressure were not well understood; barometers were rare and used primarily to measure elevation.’
    • ‘Fortunately, more ships than today sailed along the USA's coasts in the 19th century and their captains generally had barometers and an eye for weather.’
    • ‘The barometer is dropping, so we may be in a blizzard by midday.’
    • ‘Their weather station houses barometers, thermometers, a wind vane, and a rain gauge.’
    • ‘The barometer was not developed to measure atmospheric pressure as it is used for today.’
    • ‘Various instruments like thermometers and barometers are used to measure this.’
    • ‘We have text on how a barometer measures air pressure that you might be interested in.’
    • ‘They had sextants, early microscopes, clocks, thermometers, and barometers.’
    • ‘In Italy, Torricelli did research which led to developing the barometer and the measure of air pressure.’
    • ‘As the barometer had indicated, the storm swiftly arrived, but not from the expected direction.’
    • ‘There is nothing on George's interest in scientific instruments, beyond clocks and barometers, and only one small case on the Queen's patronage of botany and ‘women's’ crafts.’
    • ‘Among the chosen are barometers which can monitor and forecast weather conditions using graphic icons.’
    • ‘In Kendal, Dalton started to keep a metrological journal, he made his own thermometers, barometers and other instruments.’
    • ‘Before departing, the master of the Koombana had noted the low barometer, and had said he expected a slow trip to Broome.’
    • ‘The most frequent weather-tech questions I receive involve the use of altimeters, barometers, and/or track elevation.’
    • ‘Falling barometers are regularly followed by storms, but do not cause them.’
    • ‘The DNS Pro models also have a barometer, altimeter and weather-forecasting capability.’
    • ‘Nor does it count as an explanation of today's rainstorm to claim that it rained because a barometer reading decreased yesterday.’
    • ‘There you should be able to find thermometers, rain gauges, wind vanes and possibly barometers and humidity gauges.’
    measure, indicator, basis, standard, point of reference, guide, guideline, touchstone, yardstick, benchmark, criterion, example, model, pattern, formula, exemplar, sample, test, litmus test
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    1. 1.1 Something which reflects changes in circumstances or opinions.
      ‘furniture is a barometer of changing tastes’
      • ‘Although the amount of time spent on homework is easily measured, using time as the only barometer for success can be deceptive.’
      • ‘Florida in fact provides a useful barometer for gauging the American political mood.’
      • ‘Their treatment has become a barometer by which we can measure the essential justice of the war on terrorism.’
      • ‘This will be the ideal barometer to gauge our strength.’
      • ‘The law and order scenario in a society can, generally, be used as a barometer of good governance and social health.’
      • ‘His mood is a barometer of international politics; his spirits rise and fall with the tenor of each news day.’
      • ‘Leading Internet words may very well be the new electric symbols, barometers (or perhaps lightning rods) for the stormy forces of this new electronic democracy.’
      • ‘It's also a useful barometer for you and us to use in measuring our standards.’
      • ‘Weekend box office numbers have become the barometer by which a film's success is determined.’
      • ‘By studying their calcium carbonate shells, it is possible to determine temperature, salinity and other barometers of the time, she said.’
      • ‘The next week or so will be a barometer of just how far Houllier has travelled in his mission to return Liverpool to greatness.’
      • ‘The odds are a barometer by which to measure your expertise and challenge your sanity.’
      • ‘The restaurant trade might well be a barometer of how the local business community is faring.’
      • ‘Measures that served as barometers of how voters view gay rights and gay relationships were on the ballots in four states, and the results were a decidedly mixed bag.’
      • ‘The way the new leader organizes the inaugural Cabinet will act as a barometer indicating the direction of the new government.’
      • ‘Drinking, and particularly the ability to hold a drink, is traditionally a barometer of masculinity.’
      • ‘She says she began to understand that the voice coming out of her is a barometer of her self-image.’
      • ‘In many ways insurance companies are as good a barometer as any that climate is becoming ever more treacherous.’
      • ‘Black argues that worms should be used, along with predators such as the northern spotted owl, as barometers of forest health.’
      • ‘This is a great barometer for Cork to measure their progress this year.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from Greek baros ‘weight’ + -meter.

Pronunciation

barometer

/bəˈrɒmɪtə/