Definition of bare in English:

bare

adjective

  • 1(of a person or part of thtye body) not clothed or covered.

    ‘he was bare from the waist up’
    ‘she padded in bare feet towards the door’
    • ‘They shared a white sheet covering their bare body from the waist down.’
    • ‘He certainly doesn't look uncomfortable, relaxing back in a reclining chair, one of his bare feet covered by a towel while Sally works on the other.’
    • ‘I looked down at my feet and sure enough, they were bare.’
    • ‘The only bummer is when I look at my bare body in the mirror.’
    • ‘He was bare from the waist up and Maria could see why he was so strong and fast.’
    • ‘David jerked upright in his bed, the sheet falling off of the upper half of his body to reveal his bare torso covered in sweat.’
    • ‘A thin dark-colored membrane of some sort covered his bare body snugly.’
    • ‘It is all right and there is a bare lady in it, so it is well worth a look - though surprisingly the theatre was pretty empty.’
    • ‘As I listened to the man ramble on and on, I envisioned myself on a beach, the waves rolling toward my bare body sprawled out on the soft, powdery sand.’
    • ‘The sheets were gathered around his waist and his upper body was bare.’
    • ‘From now on, in the name of safety, it's a Lycra body stocking and bare feet for me.’
    • ‘She lifted the side of the towel and saw she was bare under it and her eyes widened, pulling the towel tightly back around her.’
    • ‘As Erik rose to his feet in the shallow waters she could see that he was again bare to the waist, except for a white bandage wrapped around his left bicep.’
    • ‘Fabyein's broad back was turned to her; his sun-darkened body was bare beneath the covers.’
    • ‘They wrapped about one leg, leaving the other bare, covered her body, and finally encased her head.’
    • ‘He folded his arms across his chest, drawing my attention to them and making me notice that they were fully bare from the shoulder downwards.’
    • ‘Mr Cunningham stood there, an amused, appreciative look on his face as his gaze swept my almost bare figure.’
    • ‘It'd sound really drastic if I told you they were all bare, but I never realized how much hair I had on my body until I started doing this.’
    • ‘‘I need a cup of coffee, and badly,’ he decided as he got out of bed and threw a robe on, covering his bare body.’
    • ‘Water dripped off of Melissa's bare body, and the woman's clothing soaked some off of her flesh.’
    naked, unclothed, undressed, uncovered, stripped, with nothing on, in a state of nature, disrobed, unclad, undraped, exposed
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Without the appropriate, usual, or natural covering.
      ‘leaf fall had left the trees bare’
      ‘bare floorboards’
      • ‘The walls were painted a warm shade of green and besides a few prints of famous paintings and a single photo of his family they were completely bare.’
      • ‘The trees would normally be thick, and snag with clawing branches and deceptive leaves, but now they were bare and skeletal, and seemed so weak.’
      • ‘I love to watch plants grow, covering fences and bare earth.’
      • ‘Whereas in the other rooms columns formed two symmetrical rows along the sides of the hall, this hall was completely bare.’
      • ‘They were bare, save for bolts and slider pieces that littered the ground.’
      • ‘Usually, performances that are considered brave rely on physical nudity to let the audience know that the actor is emotionally bare.’
      • ‘Beds are set on platforms or suspended from ceilings, bathtubs are hewn from blocks of black granite or pale limestone, and the bare wood floorboards are wide, limed and lacquered.’
      • ‘Goya shows them sitting on rocks under a bare tree, cutting plugs of contraband tobacco, with a coil of rope on the ground, handy for tying up victims.’
      • ‘How the trees looked so naked and bare with no coverings.’
      • ‘The Royal Native Oyster Stores looks exactly the way you have always wanted a fish restaurant to look: all bare bricks and exposed floorboards and battered tables.’
      • ‘At the riverside, hawthorns, oaks, beeches and other trees stand stark and bare.’
      • ‘The servant padded off down the bare wooden floorboards.’
      • ‘The green fields were blackened and the trees had been stripped bare by locusts.’
      • ‘Andrew scoured the bare halls for a possible informant; quickly turning and grasping the arm of a passing soldier.’
      • ‘The deciduous trees were just barely in bud; the aspens were as bare as whisk brooms.’
      • ‘The trees are bare, the land is bleak, closed, unproductive and numb, its furrows seemingly incapable of the new life we hope for in the spring.’
      • ‘The floor was left bare because floor coverings would have been ruined by tobacco spit.’
      • ‘Covering bare soil with a generous mulch of stable manure or compost is usually only practical for small areas.’
      • ‘Roofs seemed to jig unevenly as shingles drooped off of the edges, while many had bare spots with no covering at all.’
      • ‘One time someone ordered this adorable little seaweed that looked like tiny bare tree branches from a winter forest and I missed the name.’
      uncovered, uncarpeted, unpainted, unvarnished
      barren, bleak, exposed, desolate, stark, arid, desert, denuded, lunar
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Without the appropriate or usual contents.
      ‘a bare cell with just a mattress’
      • ‘For better or for worse, the room was Spartan, almost bare.’
      • ‘Griffith looked inside the first window and saw that it was an empty bare room with a single white bed inside, with a heavy metal door inside that resembled a safe door.’
      • ‘Before my eyes was a large, empty chamber, bare save for an interesting pattern etched upon the floor and a weapon rack by the entrance.’
      • ‘She opened the light green fridge, an odd colour but it was just regular by Val's standards, and rummaged through the bare contents.’
      • ‘James lives in a bare cell of a bedroom - only allowed out to do the housework - until he's rescued from his miserable existence by a magical giant peach and ends up famous in New York.’
      • ‘Children told me of having their rooms stripped bare and the contents thrown into the corridor.’
      • ‘Their prison cell was stripped bare because it was assumed that, as protesters, they would destroy everything they could.’
      • ‘The individual cells were tiny, bare closets with no amenities, and were designed to be too short to lie down in.’
      • ‘In the dry season, all life moves north, leaving the southern plains disappointingly bare and empty.’
      • ‘We were at pretty close to 100 percent occupancy of recreational vehicles and now they are bare, those parks.’
      • ‘With a quick glance at the bare cupboards and empty refrigerator, came the realization that John was not used to eating at home.’
      • ‘The stage is bare and empty, it looks like a typical display of Volksbühne churlishness, ingeniousness and fractiousness.’
      • ‘He was in a plain, bare cell with bars and the whole bit.’
      • ‘Behind it was something of a hidden room - bare, empty, but still there.’
      • ‘When I located the store, it looked suspiciously bare, numerous empty displays, etc.’
      • ‘As Meg brought Scott down to the car after the moving men had carried off all the stuff, Julia walked around in the empty and bare apartment.’
      • ‘They were headed farther down, several levels below the room they'd been in the day before, hoping to find more than empty rooms and bare alcoves.’
      • ‘Although the garden is looking spartan it's not bare.’
      • ‘Vulnerable people who have committed no crime and pose no threat to society are regularly forced to wait in bare cells before they get specialist treatment.’
      • ‘After Mass the Blessed Eucharist was brought to the Altar of Repose and the Tabernacle was left open, bare and empty.’
      empty, emptied, unfurnished, vacant, clear, cleared, free, stark, austere, spartan, unadorned, unembellished, unornamented, unfussy, plain
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3bare of Devoid of; without.
      ‘the interior was bare of plaster’
      • ‘The shelf was bare of any decoration, as were the walls.’
      • ‘The house looked just the same as it had when I'd left, except the basketball hoop in the front yard was gone and was replaced by a small oak tree that was bare of leaves.’
      • ‘Cromorsky didn't believe in extravagance and so kept his office bare of anything that would make any other person's office more comfortable.’
      • ‘At the south end, where Alitak Bay is, the windswept hills are mostly bare of trees, covered instead by tundra, bushes, and grassland.’
      • ‘‘Black Mountain poetry is stripped bare of everything,’ an acolyte of Frank O'Hara said.’
      • ‘A second problem is that heavily used Army training areas are becoming bare of vegetation because of constant traffic from heavy equipment and foot soldiers.’
      • ‘Jera couldn't help but notice that her flat stomach and the area below her waistline was also bare of the silky black fur that covered her arms, legs, head, and torso.’
      • ‘Stripped bare of his most elemental weaponry, and left to fend for him - or her - self, the strategic choices appear to be panic, blame gaming, and fatalistic resolve.’
      • ‘It seemed as if everyone was there, within it - there was no need to leave, and so the roads were bare of the cars and life that was apparent less than a mile away.’
      • ‘After three days of waiting, in winds that blew that bottom coastal end of Iceland bare of snow, and anything that wasn't anchored, maintenance was still unable to find a replacement vent.’
      • ‘At a rapid pace, Shun's hand began to curl up and his fingers disappeared, leaving his fist bare of appendages, and the flesh on it suddenly hardened into a sort of bone.’
      • ‘December 9, 1976, was a cold, windy day in Washington County, Ill., though the ground was still bare of snow.’
      • ‘This does not mean that the whole Sierra was bare of trees, only that certain parts of the Sierra nearer to villages were converted to pasture and that some of those areas have reforested since.’
      • ‘His chest was bare of hair and his shoulders were wide.’
      • ‘And he started to sort of to peel away at it, and before she knew it, he had stripped it bare of its golden veneer.’
      • ‘Mountainsides were stripped bare of every tree and sapling.’
      • ‘Two, we'd be propping up a regime that has so many of its 22 million subjects go hungry that the capital city is bare of vegetation, including grass.’
      • ‘Large areas of Vietnam were stripped bare of vegetation, and as much as half of the country's mangrove forests were wiped out.’
      • ‘An overwhelming and almost unbearably pure state of compassion or devotional yearning strips the mind bare of conceptual veils so that awareness is revealed in its most naked state.’
      • ‘Only the west-facing areas of the limestone, marble, and quartz, which get the brunt of the afternoon sunshine, remain dry and nearly bare of vegetation.’
      empty of, emptied of, without, lacking, devoid of, bereft of, wanting, deprived of, destitute of, free from
      View synonyms
  • 2Without addition; basic and simple.

    ‘he outlined the bare essentials of the story’
    • ‘Believed to be crammed with as many as 10,000 inmates at any given time, Insein is perennially short of bare essential supplies.’
    • ‘It is not bare production according to the direction, is it?’
    • ‘McCauley's black and white photographs of sinks and other built-in fixtures show the bare essentials of a home.’
    • ‘For all that, the staging will be simple, a bare set putting the focus on the performers' physical presence.’
    • ‘Nothing covered the doors; they were just bare brown wooden doors.’
    • ‘So appealing to rights communicates more than does the bare appeal to basic capabilities, without any further ethical argument of the sort I have supplied.’
    • ‘It was pretty basic with all the bare necessities and most importantly it had running water and proper loos.’
    • ‘By doing this, Waits has stripped the music down to its bare elements - raw blues, world beats and bare folk - and this does not always work.’
    • ‘Although a mostly bare production, in that it relied almost entirely on acting rather than stagecraft, this Twelfth Night had elements of the spectacular about it.’
    • ‘Their kids would probably be plain, bare and simple-minded.’
    • ‘For the most part, this is a bare basics album with Branch's voice and guitar always very much to the fore.’
    • ‘Jonathan Miller's bare, contemporary production of Cosi Fan Tutte set tongues wagging at its first outing in 1995, for its Armani costumes.’
    • ‘The bare figures, however, conceal the fact that domestic inflation is still stubbornly high.’
    • ‘The most plausible accounts of the Buddha's life before and during the awakening are found in bare and simple narratives in which the Buddha seems to speak of his own experience.’
    • ‘This is fine for the wilderness backpacker, but those who want to carry a little more than just the bare essentials are nowadays more or less confined to official camp sites.’
    • ‘In general he eschewed complicated effects of pulsating or flashing lights, preferring a bare and simple presentation that brought him within the orbit of Minimal art.’
    • ‘Typical of Beckett's later preoccupation with the art of minimalism, this performance cuts the story down to the bare essentials.’
    • ‘Nicole told Tommy that she liked the simple, bare hotel room.’
    • ‘The wooden table was bare and simple here, with only a single fork as a utensil.’
    straightforward, plain, simple, basic, pure, essential, bare-bones, fundamental, stripped down, cut down, stark, bald, cold, hard
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1attributive Only just sufficient.
      ‘the bare minimum of furniture’
      • ‘According to recent opinion polls, a bare majority of the American public believes that the situation in Iraq will not improve in the near future.’
      • ‘It is, your Honour, it is an extraordinary case, but at last the Supreme Court got it right, if by a mere bare majority.’
      • ‘His was a plain room, with white walls and a bare minimum of furniture.’
      • ‘The walls were all white and what furniture there was in the room was kept to a bare minimum, with only two chairs on one side of the bed.’
      • ‘Since I haven't read anybody else saying it yet, I'll jump up and be the first: they should be fired, at a bare minimum.’
      • ‘The kindness I encountered last year is absent; a western face brings a sullen welcome, calibrated to the bare minimum.’
      • ‘Even with the doctor's notes, I was given bare minimum to live on, and was forced to pay for most of the medications I needed to take around the clock in order to breathe.’
      • ‘Granted, some still get by with the bare minimum, but the great majority produce work of much higher quality than 20 years ago.’
      • ‘Even though a rather big ‘I’ features in the major part of the narration, references to the family are limited to the bare minimum.’
      • ‘Households have the bare minimum of furniture, with mattresses spread on the floor at night for beds.’
      • ‘For its part, the health board claims that the applications currently submitted constitute a bare minimum of the health services needed in the community.’
      • ‘A new survey had found that ‘a bare majority’ did see improvements, but just under half thought Edexcel's services were getting worse.’
      • ‘Journalists spend an extraordinary amount of time paring the information in their copy down to the bare minimum, especially in the all-important lead paragraph.’
      • ‘It is laid out in an area the size of a football field and represented with the bare minimum of stage furniture.’
      • ‘In trying to keep council services to a bare minimum, they are yet again lining up another key service for closure.’
      • ‘And yet, for taking the bare minimum steps necessary to save the lives of its citizens in recent years Israel has been mercilessly berated by virtually the entire world.’
      • ‘Yesterday I did less than the bare minimum of work.’
      • ‘By his calculations, the Conservatives need to make 158 gains to achieve a bare majority, and substantially more than 200 seats are up for grabs.’
      • ‘Keep your contemporary furniture choices to a bare minimum.’
      • ‘In the law, God commands the bare minimum of what is required of us; in liturgy he seeks to pour out the riches of what he wishes to give us: himself.’
      trifling, meagre, trivial, paltry, basic, scant, scanty, skimpy, minimal, slender
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2attributive Surprisingly small in number or amount.
      ‘all you need to get started with this program is a bare 10K bytes of memory’
      • ‘I put the bare amount of makeup on with trembling hands… wondering if now would be a good time to take up alcoholism with a vengeance.’
      • ‘He only drank the bare amount of blood he needed to stay alive from Elvadriewyn.’
      • ‘And ran out bare minutes later with generous amounts of local brie, stilton and mature cheddar, plus a box of mixed highland soft cheeses and some oatcakes.’
      • ‘The bare amount of light it cast illuminated the western sky in a gorgeous rainbow of pinks, yellows, and oranges.’
      • ‘Nine's reluctance to issue ratings reports during the Olympics lasted a day, with the channel releasing bare figures this morning.’
      mere, no more than, no better than, just a, only a, simple, sheer, very, basic
      View synonyms

verb

[with object]
  • Uncover (a part of the body or other thing) and expose it to view.

    ‘he bared his chest to show his scar’
    • ‘Now, I have a bit of a problem though - one of the outfits means I will be baring bits of skin that don't usually see the light of day.’
    • ‘Inside the mill dampness is baring the wood made bricks after nearly 150 years, and requires some action.’
    • ‘Why do males get away with baring their chests without coming under fire by critics?’
    • ‘King Mswati III of Swaziland was forced to revoke an edict making it an offence to ridicule the royals by baring buttocks.’
    • ‘Jennifer Lopez scotched rumours that she is pregnant by baring her stomach on live TV yesterday..’
    • ‘My statue of Jesus baring his bleeding heart has everything to do with kitsch and nothing to do with religious fanaticism.’
    • ‘Gaumont never did answer the question of whether she'd be baring it all in the show.’
    • ‘Though what we see is a woman lifting her shift and baring her legs, she is not inviting observation.’
    • ‘These women baring their upper bodies to the sun are a healthy expression of unselfconsciousness.’
    • ‘He grinned rather shyly at us, baring an impressive row of gold teeth, but clearly did not know what to do with the gadget.’
    • ‘On the other hand, they have him baring his chest, and wearing a vest in a song.’
    • ‘He also has gnomes baring their backsides, and a scattering of fake skulls, but he said all of these were just part of who he was.’
    • ‘They watch too much MuchMusic and need to idolise somebody who isn't baring her midriff.’
    • ‘With Britney baring her belly every chance she gets, tummies are getting more attention than ever.’
    • ‘Eighteen months ago Finnigan suffered the embarrassment of baring her bra to the nation during a TV award show.’
    • ‘The Comte rushed to help her, and as she seemed to be stifling, cut her bodice open with his dagger, baring her shoulder.’
    • ‘This means having my winter boots surgically removed and baring my feet to the world.’
    • ‘One of the prisoners bared his back after his initial arrest to reveal open welts allegedly caused by baton and rubber hoses.’
    • ‘It opens with a glistening Moore in skintight, mid-riff baring workout clothes doing yoga.’
    uncover, strip, lay bare, undress, unclothe, denude, unveil, unmask
    View synonyms

determiner

British
informal
  • A large amount or number of.

    ‘my birthday's on the 22nd—I'm gonna get bare cash’
    ‘I've got bare work to do’
    ‘you can't promote your party all over Twitter and then get mad when bare people show up’
    • ‘Happy birthday, hope you get bare cash.’
    • ‘As you can see I write bare tweets when I'm bored.’
    • ‘I put in bare work in the studio today.’
    • ‘I've applied for bare jobs.’
    • ‘I'm just realizing that I have bare shoes.’
    • ‘I feel like this girl invites bare people to her baby shower just for the gifts.’
    • ‘I remember the days I thought £1000 was bare money.’
    • ‘Why are bare peeps I don't know adding me on FB?’
    • ‘Got bare work to do tomoz.’
    • ‘Must take actors bare time to learn lines.’

adverb

British
informal
  • as submodifier Very; really (used as an intensifier)

    ‘you are bare lazy’
    ‘I'm in a bare good mood for once’
    • ‘Last night was bare weird.’
    • ‘Everything was bare cheap back then.’
    • ‘Why is everyone so depressed lately? I'm bare happy!’
    • ‘Got caught in the rain and now am bare wet.’
    • ‘She looks bare pleased with herself!’
    • ‘I wake up bare starving every morning.’
    • ‘My Mum's bare happy today.’
    • ‘I'm getting bare mad at this phone.’
    • ‘He used to make bare good music.’
    • ‘Jessie J's Alive album is bare good.’

Phrases

  • bare all

    • Take off all of one's clothes and display oneself to others.

      ‘she bared all for Playboy in 2005’
      • ‘After walking more than a mile down the side of the dual carriageway, officers in the police patrol car spotted the brothers baring all.’
      • ‘It is telling how little encouragement folk needed to bare all for public display.’
      • ‘Reilly says she and the other four tableau actresses bonded through baring all: ‘When you're up there with no clothes on, you've got nothing to hide behind.’’
      • ‘The girls spilled the beans about which cast member is baring all in the film.’
      • ‘Vanessa Olivarez - First to be voted out of the finalist round, we all know Vanessa quickly shed her clothes to bare all for PETA.’
      • ‘A sculpture of a woman baring all has just gone on show at a North Yorkshire church - and already some indignant worshippers are asking for it to be removed to spare their blushes.’
      • ‘He said it was difficult trying to come up with new ideas for the poses but this time the women were much more professional when it came to baring all!’
      • ‘Mirren and Walters will be baring all in turn when the film is released later this year.’
      • ‘In the news environment I was seldom exposed to nude photography, although one of my first assignments happened to be of supermodels baring all to save Table Mountain.’
      • ‘The show is about innuendo rather than baring all, but for Burnett it still meant holding his breath and taking the plunge.’
      • ‘When I was a girl, I thought nudists were weird and I never imagined it would be me baring all.’
      • ‘Under the leadership of builder Andy Little, they teamed up and presented a Full Monty-style show, baring all in front of two sell-out audiences of women.’
      • ‘For that to continue and make every single show like a naked performance, I think that's what people want in general, they want to see a band that bares all.’
      • ‘I can't say I was too thrilled at the prospect of baring all, but therapist Caroline is obviously well trained in discretion and I soon came to terms with exposing my fatty deposits.’
      • ‘The idea of 12 mature ladies - mostly from the Hamble area - baring all for charity might have sent shockwaves through the marine world.’
      • ‘A fan of baring all in his movies (Wild Things - you don't even need to freeze-frame), it transpires Kevin Bacon also likes to do the same in real life.’
      • ‘There is nothing like the thought of baring all in a bikini to keep your hand out of the biscuit barrel.’
      • ‘Staff at Geraldton Aquarena are baring all to raise money towards more shade provision.’
      • ‘‘It was quite bizarre baring all together, but we just got on with it,’ said Kate.’
      • ‘Credit to the dancer who bares all in a display that is more fitting of the mainstream Hollywood film genre.’
  • the bare bones

    • 1The basic facts about something, without any detail.

      ‘the bare bones of the plot’
      • ‘Tim Albery's serious, academic production is unremittingly dark - and why not, when the bare bones of the tale are those of an unrepentant, murderous rapist?’
      • ‘It cuts the story back to the bare bones but is visually interesting, even for those not very familiar with Shakespeare's text.’
      • ‘This story, to give just the bare bones of it, is told by the sole survivor of a Pacific Ocean shipwreck, who drifts for 7 months in a lifeboat along with a Bengal tiger.’
      • ‘There was a graphic style and a story, or at least the bare bones of one, that were very gripping.’
      • ‘But it's that kind of show, using the bare bones of what went before to create a new series to capture new fans, and with a twist ending which just begs for a new series I think it will do just that.’
      • ‘In these circumstances a biographer might be wise to say as little as possible beyond the bare bones of recorded fact.’
      • ‘And so we move with the times, stripping Twin Peaks down to the bare bones in an attempt to understand why our sense of fondness for it still lingers.’
      • ‘Menus are stripped down to the bare bones for quick navigation, and the hot news topic is always placed at the top of the home page - whether that be football scores or the latest vote counts in elections.’
      • ‘He's based the bare bones of his screenplay on our family!’
      • ‘In general, service was warm and largely efficient throughout our stay, and more than a few members of staff went beyond the bare bones of what was necessary to be helpful.’
      • ‘I wrote a story in early 2001 outlining the bare bones of what was known about the Bank, which was very little.’
      • ‘I had lunch, wrote the bare bones of the piece, e-mailed it to the office, drove to HQ, and rewrote the piece.’
      • ‘Drawing inspiration from strip-cartoon versions of Shakespeare's plays, the two groups began by stripping the stories to the bare bones and building their plays from there.’
      • ‘‘He was happy that the bare bones of the story were right, and that people should know the truth about what happened,’ Kehoe says.’
      • ‘The cropped timespan, 22 minutes in a half hour television broadcast, means that everything must be to the bare bones.’
      • ‘Their reply second time around amounted to no more than 100 words, recounting the bare bones of the Ms deVere's employment history.’
      • ‘He knows audiences expect it, crave it, and gives them the bare bones, in a sometimes naturalistic, sometimes stylised mixture of English, French, Chinese and Japanese.’
      • ‘Harold has whittled the text down to the bare bones.’
      • ‘It describes the bare bones of the plot, if you can call it that.’
      • ‘But maybe I'm just a bit old-school, and think it's better just to show the bare bones.’
      1. 1.1The very lowest level of resources necessary.
        ‘his squad is already down to the bare bones and has now been hit by a flu bug’
        • ‘Robert moved from slide to slide, elaborating on the bare bones ideas on the video screen.’
        • ‘Makeup tips, loads of photographs of cheap fashion ideas, a woman's magazine reduced to the bare bones.’
        • ‘He is the sententious writer of resolutions butchering her beautifies of song to expose the bare bones of an idea.’
        • ‘Your business plan need only be simple, or the bare bones to start off with.’
        • ‘Harold has whittled the text down to the bare bones.’
        • ‘The letter of engagement set out only the bare bones of her contract of employment.’
        • ‘By now, most readers should know the bare bones of the story.’
        • ‘They must put flesh on the bare bones of the law.’
        • ‘Systems thinkers strip away the content to reveal the bare bones of the underlying structure.’
        • ‘She delves deep into their psyches, exposing the bare bones of their thoughts.’
  • bare one's fangs

    • (of an animal) bare its teeth aggressively.

      ‘the snake reared up before her, baring its fangs’
      • ‘She bared her fangs, a small growl emitting from her throat.’
      • ‘The creature opened his mouth, bared its fangs.’
      • ‘Again, Coco bared his fangs and lurched to attack.’
      • ‘The vampire curled its top lip back and bared its fangs.’
      • ‘The fox demon flattened his ears and bared his fangs in a deep snarl.’
      • ‘The tiger snarls menacingly, baring its fangs, its breath heavy in the wintry air.’
      • ‘The other creature wheeled, bared its fangs.’
      • ‘She hissed at me baring her fangs in a sign of a threat.’
      • ‘The werewolf bared its fangs in a mirthless grin and made a low growling sound that sounded chillingly like laughter.’
      • ‘He snapped, baring his fangs at me.’
  • bare one's soul

    • Reveal one's innermost secrets and feelings to someone.

      ‘one feels vulnerable in baring one's soul to another’
      • ‘After all, if someone has bared their soul to you, albeit of their own accord, shouldn't you give a little bit of yourself in return?’
      • ‘What sort of person bares her soul to pollsters for upward of an hour - and during the holiday season yet?’
      • ‘Nevin the wordsmith goes into overdrive as he pours out his heart and bares his soul in songs such as The One I Love, Absent Friend and Turn Around.’
      • ‘Isaac Hayes bares his soul about everything from ‘Shaft’ to Scientology.’
      • ‘Springsteen, on the other hand, with often a simpler music, bares his soul, and tears out your heart.’
      • ‘And for not baring his soul to the media, he surely deserves a merit badge, not a mauling.’
      • ‘Night after night there was someone baring their soul on national TV creating their own live and unplugged soap opera.’
      • ‘Callers find themselves baring their soul almost without knowing it.’
      • ‘The anti-war agitator and an ex-Labour Party MP, George Galloway, bares his soul in an interview with the ‘Guardian’.’
      • ‘Funny, sharp, intelligent, a little bit guarded for someone who apparently bares her soul in her weekly columns for a Sunday newspaper, she's as friendly and down-to-earth as her books.’
      • ‘Apart from baring my soul to the millions of people online - well the half dozen or so who read my thingy at least - I've not really done much.’
      • ‘On that day I bare my soul, make myself vulnerable to friends and family by expressing my feelings.’
      • ‘The reason I am baring my soul about all this is to caution all the parents of primary schoolchildren out there: be careful what you say.’
      • ‘I had extended myself, baring my soul to another who had once done the same for me.’
      • ‘Delving into echoes of his personal history, Campbell resists this alienation and bares his soul to readers and to the land.’
      • ‘Perhaps you think baring your soul so poetically will make you irresistible, but to me it sounds condescending and self-deceptive.’
      • ‘Suddenly the safety of the anonymity is vanished and the person is left feeling somewhat vulnerable and exposed, as if they bared their soul to the world.’
      • ‘In Flavour of the Week, writer/performer Alix Sobler keeps her clothes on but bares her soul, playing a young woman who examines her love life while waiting for the results of her STD tests.’
      • ‘One difficult issue in making an autobiographical work is the fear of baring one's soul only to be told that one is self-indulgent or narcissistic, labels that are often placed on autobiographical works.’
      • ‘He bares his soul before the judge, who holds the fate of his daughter in his hands.’
  • bare one's teeth

    • Show one's teeth, typically when angry.

      ‘he bared his teeth in a grimace’
      • ‘The bride bared her teeth in a rough approximation of a smile; fear radiated from her eyes.’
      • ‘The lovely young woman apologetically bared her teeth, not quite smiling.’
      • ‘Nadine shook her head, and instead pulled her lips apart with her fingers and bared her teeth at us.’
      • ‘The ducklings were also shown pictures of a fox baring its teeth, but were less worried when shown a picture of a fox with its mouth closed.’
      • ‘For the first time during the interview, Butler camps it up, waving his arms above his head and baring his teeth.’
      • ‘Desperate for the off, they pawed the ground, bared their teeth and sank their fangs into each other's necks.’
      • ‘One of them latched on to my leg and wouldn't let go while the others circled around, snapping, growling and baring their teeth.’
      • ‘Fear and aggression can keep us safe - such as the she-wolf who protects her cubs by baring her teeth.’
      • ‘But Mumu is afraid of the landowner and bares her teeth to her.’
      • ‘‘No, TRUST me,’ she hissed, baring her teeth. ‘You REALLY REALLY don't want to know.’’
      • ‘In the red corner sat a butch, dark-skinned, muscleman baring his teeth.’
      • ‘As soon as Sue and I try to approach, the dominant males curl their lips back and bare their teeth.’
      • ‘He saw them watching him and bared his teeth in the manner of an angry dog.’
      • ‘She bared her teeth - not angry, simply contemplative, eyes shining with all the life that Yami's had lacked.’
      • ‘A guard emerged from the watchtower, where a sizable Caucasian shepherd bared his teeth.’
      • ‘Instead, she bared her teeth in a disgusted sneer.’
      • ‘Dace asked, baring his teeth in a fierce, angry grin.’
      • ‘They are a great, big pack of countless mongrels baring their teeth and don't you think for one second that you are safe or that it is George Bush's fault that you are not.’
      • ‘The third was a lively bay gelding and when we tried to saddle him, he reared up and bared his teeth.’
      • ‘She walks off with the show, but not before she clomps around the stage, sways drunkenly, spits, bares her teeth and sits obliviously with her dress hanging open, leaving all other actors in the cast lagging behind.’
  • with one's bare hands

    • Without using tools or weapons.

      ‘he was capable of killing a man with his bare hands’
      • ‘Close up, the news is about voices being heard from beneath rubble, about rescuers digging with their bare hands and sometimes people emerging alive.’
      • ‘Frenchmen should ask themselves how it is possible for a crowd of civilians to demolish a fort with their bare hands while chanting Liberté!’
      • ‘Claw at the roots with your bare hands if you must.’
      • ‘Warriors did not fight with their bare hands, but rather with weapons almost all the time.’
      • ‘And that's not counting all the people who practically ran downtown (no cars or subways) to dig it out with their bare hands.’
      • ‘In earlier years, Chinese action movies did not draw a large Western audience as the action in such movies mostly involved two people fighting with their bare hands for five minutes.’
      • ‘Storming through the library and taking the lift to the top floor they leapt upon the huge wizard's nest perched on top of the library tower and tore it apart with their bare hands.’
      • ‘A group of women - made one by the black mystery of their costume - are scrabbling with their bare hands to dig a grave in rocky earth.’
      • ‘What level are the power generators to the weapon on - I'll destroy that weapon with my bare hands if I have to!’
      • ‘There's a rite of passage in many tribes of taking off all your clothes and going off into the woods to survive with your bare hands.’
      • ‘What's weirder than catching a catfish with your bare hands?’
      • ‘Rescue teams backed by bulldozers and earthmovers worked into the night, using torches and removing concrete chunks with their bare hands in search of survivors.’
      • ‘‘They were there picking up shrapnel with their bare hands,’ says Kenny.’
      • ‘The pages never got to practice with someone, as they were all new to blocking weapons with their bare hands and spent the entire hour trying to get it right.’
      • ‘So whether you're fighting with your bare hands, an edged weapon, an impact weapon, pistol, subgun, shotgun, carbine or rifle - it's all from the same position.’
      • ‘I attacked with my bare hands, rejecting the tools of shellfish eating in favour of the messy approach.’
      • ‘Most of us lack any formal training in self-defense with an edged weapon or even with our bare hands, for that matter.’
      • ‘He said: ‘People have been trying to move big blocks of concrete with their bare hands.’’
      • ‘In dozens of villages, many cut off from rescuers by quake-induced landslides, relatives desperate to find their loved ones dug through rubble with their bare hands.’
      • ‘Meantime, they tear into the pig carcasses with their bare hands.’

Origin

Old English bær (noun), barian (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch baar.

Pronunciation

bare

/bɛː/