Main definitions of bard in English

: bard1bard2

bard1

noun

literary, Archaic
  • 1A poet, traditionally one reciting epics and associated with a particular oral tradition.

    ‘our national bard, Robert Burns’
    • ‘From 1808 to 1834 Moore continued to add to his Irish Melodies, which established him as the national bard of Ireland.’
    • ‘Even two centuries ago, Gotthold Ephraim Lessing scoffed that the bard was perhaps more praised than perused.’
    • ‘These two kinds of periodicity may coincide, as in carefully end-stopped lines, or in the formulae chosen over centuries by the bards of oral traditions.’
    • ‘On a dozen axes of values, then, there is a deep congruity, much of it reflecting the influence of the archaic epic bard on the nineteenth-century novelist.’
    • ‘In the past, Karakalpak bards (performing poets) roamed from village to village, reciting stories and verses.’
    poet, versifier, verse-maker, rhymester, rhymer, sonneteer, lyricist, lyrist, elegist
    laureate
    balladeer
    swan
    poetaster
    troubadour
    rhymist, maker
    metricist, ballad-monger, idyllist, parnassian, poeticule
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Shakespeare.
    2. 1.2The winner of a prize for Welsh verse at an Eisteddfod.
      ‘he was admitted as a Bard at the National Eisteddfod’
      • ‘The Crowning of the Bard is one of the most important events in an eisteddfod’
      • ‘Today the term 'bard' in Wales means the victor at an eisteddfod, whether in poetry or music.’
      • ‘Eisteddfod literally means a sitting (eistedd = to sit), perhaps a reference to the hand-carved chair traditionally awarded to the best poet in the ceremony 'The Crowning of the Bard'.’

Origin

Middle English: from Scottish Gaelic bàrd, Irish bard, Welsh bardd, of Celtic origin. In Scotland in the 16th century it was a derogatory term for an itinerant musician, but was later romanticized by Sir Walter Scott.

Pronunciation:

bard

/bɑːd/

Main definitions of bard in English

: bard1bard2

bard2

noun

  • A rasher of fat bacon placed on meat or game before roasting.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Cover (meat or game) with rashers of fat bacon.

    ‘the venison was barded and marinated’
    • ‘To bard meat, simply lay strips of fat over the surface, or use kitchen string to tie on the fat.’
    • ‘One is to bard meat with fat (cover it with strips of fat, usually pork fatback), an outdated practice but one still taught in cooking schools.’
    • ‘To bard meat, you cover the meat with a thin layer of fat or fatty bacon and secure with butcher’s string.’
    • ‘Pork or other fat can be used to bard meat.’

Origin

Early 18th century: from French barde, a transferred sense of barde armour for the breast and flanks of a warhorse, based on Arabic barḏa'a saddlecloth, padded saddle.

Pronunciation:

bard

/bɑːd/