Definition of baptism of fire in English:

baptism of fire

phrase

  • A difficult introduction to a new job or activity.

    ‘the summer tour to Australia was truly a baptism of fire’
    • ‘I think it was a baptism of fire in terms of an introduction to fun on two wheels; I really don't think I'll ever experience weather as bad as that again.’
    • ‘It looks like being another difficult week for Sandy Crombie, who is having a baptism of fire since assuming the top job at Standard Life.’
    • ‘These days, Phuc enjoys talking to the journalists who once tormented her, because they are part of her professional life; but the relationship is tinged with the indelible memory of her baptism of fire.’
    • ‘‘It was a baptism of fire last year,’ admits Gass.’
    • ‘Professional cycling is a tough business that demands extremely high levels of fitness and resolve and the Sligo man is making significant strides in his baptism of fire in this highly competitive sport.’
    • ‘Very few teams recover from being 3-1 down inside English football's most imposing atmosphere, but Ranieri's did on his so-called baptism of fire.’
    • ‘The Happy Scrubbers got a real baptism of fire at the opening of the Golf season at Doors Golf Club on Saturday, with absolutely horrendous climatic conditions prevailing.’
    • ‘The experience proved a classic baptism of fire for MacArthur, who got little sleep and had to force herself to eat, all the time fretting about the record.’
    • ‘Latham's first big test, his baptism of fire, has shown a man who fights best with his back to the wall.’
    • ‘Patel had a baptism of fire on the Test stage in 1996, from which he was never given a chance to recover.’
    • ‘Allardyce tells it like it is and neither Okocha nor Bernard Mendy can contradict the manager after their baptisms of fire at Loftus Road.’
    • ‘Blanc, though, faces a baptism of fire against Duncan Ferguson and Ferguson has warned the ex-French international what to expect from the towering Everton striker.’
    • ‘Without injured captain Jon Petrie and his predecessor Gordon Bulloch, who retired last month, the new Scotland boss faces a baptism of fire in his first outings as the full-time coach.’
    • ‘And in a baptism of fire, she took to the catwalk at the Gharani Strok show during London Fashion Week, alongside Naomi Campbell, and other top models including Olivia Inge and Jamie Gunns.’
    • ‘Waterford ladies face a baptism of fire when they take on champions Harlequins in the opening round of the AIB Bank sponsored Munster Ladies Hockey Division One League on Saturday.’
    • ‘If yesterday's attack was a parent's nightmare, the incident also proved a baptism of fire for new head teacher Richard Kelly who, at 38, is one of the youngest school bosses in the country.’
    • ‘Mr Savory's first show was a baptism of fire: ‘The very first show was in Hyde Park in London in front of one and a half million people over four days in 1994,’ he said.’
    • ‘Many amateurs jumping to the ‘big show’ encounter extreme difficulties during their baptism of fire.’
    • ‘With the Fianna Fáil organisation in Kerry North riddled with dissent, young McEllistrim's introduction to national politics is something of a baptism of fire.’
    • ‘But Election 2004 will be somewhat of a baptism of fire for her daughter Dawn who, at 21, is the youngest candidate seeking a seat in Kerry.’
    painful experience, unpleasant experience, trial, tribulation, test, nightmare, trauma, baptism of fire, hell, hell on earth, misery, trouble, difficulty, torture, torment, agony
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