Main definitions of bank in English

: bank1bank2

bank1

noun

  • 1The land alongside or sloping down to a river or lake:

    ‘willows lined the bank of the stream’
    • ‘Beyond that, a narrower but more fertile inner plain slopes down to the bank of the Delaware River.’
    • ‘Each year, hundreds of thousands of spectators line the banks of the River Thames to support the two crews.’
    • ‘Winter Wrens breed in moist coniferous forests and nest in dense brush especially along stream banks.’
    • ‘They were standing on the banks of the lake in the forest, watching the sunlight glisten off its silver surface.’
    • ‘He and a girlfriend moved into an old hunting shack on the banks of Lake Superior, about eight miles from the nearest town.’
    • ‘All these cities are built alongside rivers whose banks provide major recreational spaces.’
    • ‘Russian villages were typically situated near the bank of a lake, river, or stream.’
    • ‘The Glasgow plan aims to quicken the pace of development at Atlantic Quay and surrounding land on the north bank of the river.’
    • ‘Lighting effects have been put up in trees and rafts lie alongside the banks of the lake suggesting that fireworks could be launched from the water's surface.’
    • ‘Willow will be planted to shore up the banks of the River Devon and wetland created to soak up water on neighbouring hilltops.’
    • ‘We chugged along the river, its banks lined with shabby wooden huts.’
    • ‘Ahead of me a row of pollarded willows lines the bank of the stream, beyond which the ground slopes gently upwards towards leafless woodland, appearing sombre grey.’
    • ‘Wooden lodges and log cabins are usually found on the banks of a lake or river.’
    • ‘Santo said the flooding was triggered by torrential rains over the last three days, which caused several rivers to overflow their banks.’
    • ‘The river overflows its banks and floods the land with fresh water and deposits a thick layer of rich alluvial soil.’
    • ‘Welcome to the sunny banks of Lake Victoria in Tanzania - one of the world's largest lakes and, according to some, the cradle of humankind.’
    • ‘Massive housing projects are springing up on the banks of lakes.’
    • ‘When we finally arrived at the rather pretty camp-site on the banks of a blue lake, we had been travelling for more than 24 hours.’
    • ‘The poplar and willow trees line the opposite bank of the River Kennet from the Town Mill homes.’
    • ‘These figures for the most part do not include freshwater wetlands along the shores of lakes, banks of rivers, in estuaries and along the marine coasts.’
    edge, side, embankment, levee, border, verge, boundary, margin, rim, fringe, fringes, flank, brink, perimeter, circumference, extremity, periphery, limit, outer limit, limits, bound, bounds
    View synonyms
  • 2A long, high mass or mound of a particular substance:

    ‘a grassy bank’
    ‘a bank of snow’
    • ‘The grassy banks, constructed about 150 years ago, have never been treated with pesticides or fertilisers.’
    • ‘We learned that boulders hurt even when covered by snow banks.’
    • ‘On either side, cliffs tower upwards with dark cloud banks masking their peaks; small waterfalls cascade down the abyss and onto the windscreen.’
    • ‘She started falling sideways and ended up flat on her back in a snow bank!’
    • ‘Once you got into the stadium, there were no seats, only grassy banks.’
    • ‘Dead ahead, blue sky is visible, a bank of clouds farther on.’
    • ‘Behind, a saffron-tinged bank of clouds rises above a shadowy fringe of trees.’
    • ‘If you hang them below the bumper, they can easily get knocked out of adjustment or even broken by curbs or snow banks.’
    • ‘Heavy banks of clouds covered the sky, only a pale glow seeping through.’
    • ‘It got rather too hot for outdoor comfort by lunch time but not long after that a bank of rain cloud appeared as if by magic, giving us a short, sharp shower that served to cool the whole landscape.’
    • ‘The shop occupies a prominent and elevated position on a grassy bank next to the Market Cross.’
    • ‘As we begin our descent I am able to catch a glimpse of a magnificent peak penetrating the cloud bank near Portland.’
    • ‘The main runway will be put back to arable land and a bank of trees will be planted on the outside.’
    • ‘I stood up and Jordan and I walked over to the grassy bank by the playground.’
    • ‘At the top I encountered my first daffodils on the grassy bank in front of a house.’
    • ‘Turn left and cross two bridges before taking a path to the right, along the top of a grassy bank.’
    • ‘It was an especially severe New England winter; snow banks were our foremost obstacles.’
    • ‘The snow banks are enormous because they keep stacking it and stacking it all winter.’
    • ‘I peer over one shoulder to see a bank of dark cloud menacingly close, and I can feel the temperature beginning to drop.’
    • ‘Hedgerows with grassy banks can shelter primroses, orchids and other wildflowers.’
    slope, rise, incline, gradient, ramp, acclivity, tump
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 An elevation in the seabed or a riverbed; a mudbank or sandbank.
      • ‘This is definitely so for small juvenile fish, but the bigger adults prefer a mix of clean and broken ground, often seeking out gravel banks and sandbanks adjacent to much rougher ground.’
      • ‘It is a great sight, with ant-like streams pouring across long pontoons over the river's shallow sandy banks to innumerable craft moored midstream.’
      • ‘At the mouth the shallow banks of the creek slanted sharply down around a large, flat boulder protruding from the lake, creating a miniature canyon of mud.’
      • ‘The rope lands on a shingle bank in the streambed.’
      • ‘Flat banks of white sand covered with tall grasses stretched into the distance.’
      • ‘The floor was a soft bank of gravel and sand underneath half a metre of scum topped water.’
      • ‘Far from the island we waded through a waist deep channel of fast flowing ebb tide, then climbed onto a hard bank of rippled sand.’
      • ‘It is an altogether different kind of wreck, with the broken remains well scattered and partly buried by a 2m-high bank of sand.’
      • ‘The route goes up and down, deepest point 18m and as shallow as 6m over some sand and gravel banks.’
      • ‘So obviously when you have a tremendous coral reef and the combination of shallow banks, you have a fantastic habitat for all types of marine life.’
    2. 2.2 A transverse slope given to a road, railway, or sports track to enable vehicles or runners to maintain speed round a curve.
      • ‘I learned firsthand how these Olympic competitors use the steep banks to reach top speed.’
      • ‘Sometimes, as we rode the bank of a curve, the wheels became slightly airborne, momentarily escaping the pull of gravity.’
      • ‘This week I make the swap from climbing the banks of the track to climbing the mountains in California.’
      • ‘So we need a good baseline setup for a great car for the weekend because it is a pretty flat track, and the bank doesn't help the car turn.’
      slope, rise, incline, gradient, ramp, acclivity, tump
      View synonyms
    3. 2.3[mass noun] The sideways tilt of an aircraft when turning in flight:
      ‘a rather steep angle of bank’
      • ‘Sensing the danger, Dan eased off his angle of bank and pulled up slightly, barrel rolling away from the direction of turn.’
      • ‘A hard bank to starboard broke the lock quickly enough but the enemy pilot was still on him.’
      • ‘As I reduced my left hand bank angle to shift my circle I was pitched violently over.’
      • ‘This action made the situation even worse, because the left cyclic only put us into a sharp angle of bank before impact.’
      • ‘Another option would be to roll the helicopter into a high angle of bank to stay over the airfield and to avoid the trees.’
      • ‘I made my power pull into the wind for take-off and found myself excessively nose low, with an increasing angle of bank.’
      • ‘He indicated that the angle of bank decreased periodically, but that the aircraft was always in a right wing-low attitude.’
      • ‘Maybe the low altitude intimidates the pilot and the bigger bank angle seems threatening.’
      • ‘Back-stick pressure must also be released as bank decreases or the aircraft will climb.’
      • ‘It would be of value to calculate the exact stall speeds for the actual wing loading at various appropriate bank angles.’
      • ‘Your handling has started to degenerate and you are having trouble holding bank angles.’
      • ‘Unless there's a specific pitch or bank error you actively want to correct, don't touch the controls.’
      • ‘If there is too much bank for the crosswind, excess lift is deflected to the right, and the airplane actually moves sideways into the wind.’
      • ‘Guessing he knew best, I once again pulled power and rolled the aircraft to a 45-degree angle of bank.’
      • ‘I know this because throughout the roll into the unwanted bank, she was literally shouting at me for help!’
      • ‘We were still in a 30-degree angle of bank turn to the left, but my senses were telling me I was straight and level.’
      • ‘As we cruise by the water bird colony at 300 feet, I roll the aircraft into a rather steep angle of bank.’
      • ‘It has been speculated that it was in this bank that the left wing hit terrain, beginning the crash sequence.’
      • ‘All aerobatics, spins and banks in excess of 60 degrees are prohibited.’
      • ‘The aircraft rolls a bit to the left and he compensates by adding some right aileron to hold the 30-degree bank angle.’
  • 3A set of similar things, especially electrical or electronic devices, grouped together in rows:

    ‘the DJ had big banks of lights and speakers on either side of his console’
    • ‘Two banks of four electric smoke grenade dischargers are fitted either side of the front turret.’
    • ‘That engine featured three banks of four cylinders each.’
    • ‘Its English news studio sports a bank of TV monitors just as CNN does.’
    • ‘By the time both beds were wheeled to the end of the hallway near a bank of elevators, Jared was able to see both kidnappers more closely.’
    • ‘Off to one side of the lobby now, I spied a bank of elevators.’
    • ‘It consisted of a bank of electronic tone generators and an associated array of processing devices that regulated the nature of the sounds.’
    • ‘At the front of the vehicle he saw a bank of large video monitors that gave an astonishing real-time view of the terrain outside.’
    • ‘Whenever I saw him standing at the bank of elevators, I'd quickly turn and scurry away.’
    • ‘There was a pool table, a small bank of computers and a corpulent Italian speaking loudly into a mobile phone.’
    • ‘There are banks of electronic gizmos of unknown origin and purpose.’
    • ‘It is powered by a conventional electric motor with a bank of batteries to run it.’
    • ‘It is not the mast but the bank of aerials at the top that radiates microwave energy.’
    • ‘Check for sources of electromagnetic interference such as banks of modems on web servers.’
    • ‘Across the room, mounted above a bank of exercise machines, are five television monitors, each set to a different station.’
    • ‘He goes to work at his bank of electronics, and yes - twiddles some knobs.’
    • ‘He rounded a bank of lockers and almost got a Glock 9mm shoved up his nose.’
    • ‘There was smoke in the hall near the bank of elevators.’
    • ‘My flickering flashlight swung across a bank of overhead stowage.’
    • ‘Once again I was thwarted in my attempt to understand how to tune in to the audio on the bank of TVs mounted above the treadmills.’
    • ‘In that grey box you see by the railroad crossing lights there is a bank of batteries.’
    array, row, line, tier, group, series
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 A tier of oars:
      ‘the early ships had only twenty-five oars in each bank’
      • ‘The starboard banks of oars dipped hard into the water, and the trading ship swung abruptly to the left and slowly glided to the dock.’
      • ‘If there were 100 oars per bank, that would have required 15000 oarsmen.’
      • ‘The standard galley or galere ordinaire, had twenty-six banks of oars per side, with five men at each oar.’
  • 4The cushion of a pool table:

    [as modifier] ‘a bank shot’
    • ‘Roy sank 3 more and snookered Dave but he played a bank shot potting his ball in the centre!’
    • ‘His surprise victory was completed with a well-taken length of the table bank shot on the 8 ball.’
    • ‘I have been known to go to my bank shots when I am not seeing the cut shots.’
    • ‘Got any pointers on the diamond system or some good way of practicing bank shots?’
    • ‘I can only stop the cue ball and take a chance on the bank shot.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Heap (a substance) into a mass or mound:

    ‘the rain banked the soil up behind the gate’
    ‘snow was banked in humps at the roadside’
    • ‘In Europe, particularly France, Germany, and Belgium, they cultivate a white asparagus by gradually banking the soil over the shoots as they grow.’
    • ‘The muck was banked up so high in places that we couldn’t rescue some of the horses until the doors had been removed from their hinges.’
    • ‘In places, snow was banked up more than 3m either side of the road.’
    make a pile of, make a heap of, make a stack of
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[no object] Form into a mass or mound:
      ‘purple clouds banked up over the hills’
      • ‘The cottage was quiet, almost buried in the drifts banked up against the walls.’
      • ‘When the traffic banked up and a driver braked, car wheels could get hooked up in the ruts.’
      • ‘He said there had been several instances where traffic had banked up after objects were placed on the city's train tracks.’
      • ‘That rubble now lay banked up around the ship, covering perhaps two meters of the lower hull; more towards the stern.’
      • ‘Outside, the crowds had now thronged Parliament Square and banked up alongside the prime real estate bordering the abbey itself.’
    2. 1.2 Heap up (a fire) with tightly packed fuel so that it burns slowly:
      ‘she banked up the fire’
      • ‘The water was heated by the coal range and we would bank up the fire before going to bed and have plenty of hot water in the morning.’
      • ‘Back in my room, I banked up the fire until I had a roaring blaze going.’
      • ‘They'd stoked and banked the fire for the night, drawn the purple drapes, and put a hot bedpan in between her sheets to warm it ready for her.’
      • ‘Greg, who was the only one who knew how to do it properly, had been banking the fire every night so they would have embers to start the morning's fire with.’
      • ‘She took his hand, leading him around the room as she turned off lights, banked the fire.’
      smother, stifle
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 Edge or surround with a ridge or row of something:
      ‘steps banked with pots of chrysanthemums’
      • ‘In summer, umbrella-topped tables line a terrace banked with flowers, creating a romantic spot for dinner under the stars.’
      • ‘‘Let's have a seat shall we,’ the two walked over to some chairs that were banked along the wall and sat down.’
      • ‘She pulled her IV stand behind her as she walked over to the sofa in the corner of the room, banked by large bookcases filled with novels of all genres.’
      • ‘This addition can be as simple as a wall spigot dripping musically into a trough banked with pots of bright flowers.’
  • 2(with reference to an aircraft or vehicle) tilt or cause to tilt sideways in making a turn:

    [no object] ‘the plane banked as if to return to the airport’
    [with object] ‘I banked the aircraft steeply and turned’
    • ‘Everyone was soon out and with a nod, a very cool nod, the pilot banked the aircraft sideways and downwards away from the wall and roared off up the gorge.’
    • ‘He performed a tactical approach to the airfield, banking the plane 45 degrees in a tight downward spiral to the left.’
    • ‘He took over the flight controls and banked the airplane to the right.’
    • ‘However, panic began to set in amongst the passengers when the aircraft suddenly banked to one side before plunging 10,000 feet in four seconds.’
    • ‘I watched from the rooftop as the the aircraft banked and swooped and burst into bright flames which showered to the ground like fireworks.’
    • ‘As the aircraft continued to bank to about 80 deg, ground contact became more positive and the left wing started to buckle.’
    • ‘He said the plane banked steeply on its approach.’
    • ‘As the plane was banking around the city, he could clearly see the downtown section and the building his lab was in.’
    • ‘The plane felt fine, no observable damage, so I banked around and went in for another quick pass.’
    • ‘Most aircraft except for helicopters will bank to make a turn.’
    • ‘The plane lurched up, banked to its left and started to fall off in our direction.’
    • ‘He gently banked his aircraft forty-five degrees west to make a wide circle around the burning vehicles.’
    • ‘Then the plane started to bank to the side and go into a rather sharp turn.’
    • ‘At the end, I swoop up again and bank left, taking the aircraft in a steep climb over the surrounding hills.’
    • ‘Afraid the soldiers had seen the package, Ian ducked down instinctively, but the aircraft banked steeply and slid down into the valley.’
    • ‘The plane had to turn and come right, banking around the tower.’
    • ‘The fun was over, and I slowed and banked up to a safer altitude.’
    • ‘The engine thunder came to them as the plane banked away over the sea.’
    • ‘The aircraft banked sharply over Mangrove Cay before leveling out as the pilot made his final approach to the runway.’
    • ‘The aircraft carrier banked sharply, turning to port, tilting the whole world thirty degrees.’
    tilt, lean, tip, slant, incline, angle, slope, list, camber, pitch, dip, cant, be at an angle, put at an angle
    View synonyms
  • 3Build (a road, railway, or sports track) higher at the outer edge of a bend to facilitate fast cornering:

    ‘the track was banked to allow a train to take curves faster while maintaining passenger comfort’
    • ‘One of the corners is also going to be slightly banked, which will be interesting.’
    • ‘The tight, banked bends on indoor tracks mean a tall athlete with a long stride length will struggle in the 200m and 400m.’
    • ‘It cost £3.5m to build and adjoins the Sportcity indoor facility which boasts a four-lane, banked 200m track.’
    • ‘Five miles of twisting, turning, banked track with just enough adrenaline to keep you interested but not enough to make you throw up.’
    • ‘These turns are usually banked, constructed at an angle, which allows the cyclist to ride in a straight line with the track banking navigating the direction.’
    • ‘The counterclockwise racing of the greyhounds on a banked track may have predisposed their uphill foot to increased stress.’
    • ‘On to an indicated 190 mph and I have exceeded my personal best; now the banked bend approaches and we are gaining on the car in front, so I have to slow.’
    • ‘This event features four racers at a time taking a downhill course full of jumps, turns and banked corners in a race to the finish.’
    • ‘The teammate then moves to the top of the circular banked track and coasts while he recovers for his next stint.’
    • ‘In Japan, where top riders earn fortunes, the tracks are less steeply banked and they race on all-weather asphalt, rather than wooden surfaces.’
    • ‘Exeter is a track a lot of riders don't like because it is very fast and banked.’
    • ‘It doesn't have as much clearance underneath it for this kind of a banked race track.’
    • ‘The banked corners are a feature of the Indianapolis circuit and are a one-off in Formula One.’
    • ‘It really all depends on what you're wanting to do and how banked the track is.’
    • ‘Confidence grew as riders got used to the banked track, but the day was sadly marred by a serious injury to one of the Lancaster CC contingent who landed heavily on the hard surface in the track centre.’
    • ‘And imagine that situation not on a flat highway, but on a narrow, one-groove racetrack with banked corners.’
    • ‘The 1.51-mile infield road course includes part of the banked oval track used for NASCAR stock-car races.’
    • ‘Since the tracks are banked, the advantage usually goes to the driver on the inside - the outside car is more vulnerable.’
    • ‘Cycling on banked tracks is one of the oldest forms of the sport, dating back to the track-racing boom of the 1890s in Europe.’
    • ‘Cyclists contest a variety of events on an inside oval track banked at 42 degrees.’
  • 4often as noun bankingBritish (of a locomotive) provide additional power for (a train) in ascending an incline.

    • ‘A banking locomotive was often used to assist trains up particularly steep or long banks, or gradients.’
    • ‘Mr Elson said because banking locomotives were put on at Tebay to get the trains up the hill, and were taken off at Askrigg Bank, the two layouts made a fascinating pair to display together.’
    • ‘The train would have stopped in the adjacent Victoria station to collect a banking locomotive to assist up the stiff climb to Miles Platting.’
  • 5(of an angler) succeed in landing (a fish):

    ‘it was the biggest rainbow trout that had ever been banked’
    • ‘Even whilst these fish were being weighed and photographed, Joe and Chris banked further fish of 37 lb 8oz and 34 lb 6oz.’
    • ‘Yes, this is pike heaven all right and it won't be long before one day somebody banks that magical sixty-pound fish.’
    • ‘This is about as close to the weir as you can bank fish.’
    • ‘Several roach over that magical 2lb barrier have been banked recently with anglers prepared to sit it out on bread flake being rewarded with the better fish.’
    • ‘In all I banked sixty-one fish in about forty sessions.’
  • 6North American (in pool) play (a ball) so that it rebounds off a surface such as a cushion:

    ‘I banked the eight ball off two cushions’
    • ‘I've reverse banked many an eight ball to give my opponent a ‘hopeless’ feeling.’
    • ‘You can shoot the safe by banking the 7-ball to the center of the rail, but the better choice is not to let your opponent shoot at all.’
    • ‘He banks the seven just to show off.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse bakki, of Germanic origin; related to bench. The senses ‘set of things in rows’ and ‘tier of oars’ are from French banc, of the same ultimate origin.

Pronunciation

bank

/baŋk/

Main definitions of bank in English

: bank1bank2

bank2

noun

  • 1A financial establishment that uses money deposited by customers for investment, pays it out when required, makes loans at interest, and exchanges currency:

    [as modifier] ‘a bank account’
    • ‘It also included the interest rates on the bank loans that the winner would take.’
    • ‘That begs the question as to whether our money would be safer under the mattress or in a bank deposit account than invested in shares, unit trusts or pension schemes.’
    • ‘We've regularly - almost religiously - deposited money into our bank savings account.’
    • ‘‘Because of the exchange risk, banks assume that local currency loans are best,’ Rumenov added.’
    • ‘When you are financing such investments, bank charges and any interest payments are typically deductible in the year in which they are paid.’
    • ‘To make the investments Helmersen borrowed large sums of money from Danish banks and financial institutions.’
    • ‘The banks must pay a substantial portion of the Army escort service in light of the huge profits they are making, the Minister said.’
    • ‘Should I be looking for a bank loan or alternative finance, perhaps through an outside investor?’
    • ‘It is common sense that citizens will not deposit money in banks for such minimal interest earnings.’
    • ‘Retained earnings are just as much money as a bank loan or new equity.’
    • ‘My current bank deposit account interest rate has just been cut again.’
    • ‘Most people have a current account and most banks pay virtually no interest on this money.’
    • ‘However, there was one clear distinction between giving and taking interest on loans and bank deposits.’
    • ‘This amount of money could be supplemented by a loan received from a bank - high interest, but easily accessible as a last option.’
    • ‘The easiest way to do so will be to deposit the money into banks or invest it in stock and bond funds and life-insurance policies.’
    • ‘Portfolio investment also includes deposits in banks and financial investment in government or private securities.’
    • ‘There is no denying that in Zambia many such establishments, especially the banks, operate money markets that are under serious pecuniary constraints.’
    • ‘His unorthodox government has not helped to attract investors, and foreign banks lowered corporate credit ratings for new loans.’
    • ‘The company will finance half of the planned investment through a bank loan.’
    • ‘It's in how the money is spent - long after the offerings are counted and safely in the bank.’
    financial institution
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A stock of something available for use when required:
      ‘a blood bank’
      figurative ‘Britain has a bank of highly exportable skills’
      • ‘A job bank computer is also available at the office and helps those looking for work to see what is available.’
      • ‘The value of the seed bank in the species pool at GCB was estimated to be greater than any other species establishment mode.’
      • ‘Already artists, scientists, musicians and communities have together created a bank of songs, stories, choirs and artworks.’
      • ‘The building settles into contours, spreading out horizontally over a vast buried chamber - the seed bank itself.’
      • ‘Time banks, where members build up credits by giving up an hour of their time to provide a service for another person in the scheme, are a more recent phenomenon.’
      • ‘The number of eggs stored in the egg bank varied within and among species but was usually lower in the temporary pond species.’
      • ‘For example, seed dormancy, leading to the production of soil seed banks, allows escape from unfavourable conditions in time rather than in space.’
      • ‘Also, these figures are based on me submitting articles to various article banks on the Internet myself.’
      • ‘For an egg bank to maintain its value as a historical record, the sediments should have little or no disturbance.’
      • ‘Each question in the test bank is referenced to its original source in the textbook, making it easy to verify or modify questions and answers.’
      • ‘Xenografts derived from animal sources might also be used and could be stored in tissue banks for use when required.’
      • ‘The organization now has an image bank of stock images that clients can view and contact the photographers.’
      • ‘Further, tissue banks are only required to test donated human tissue for HIV and hepatitis viruses.’
      • ‘There is a bank of volunteer drivers available although many groups prefer to use their own.’
      • ‘The eye bank is accessible round the clock through a dedicated hotline 1081.’
      • ‘That is a good idea, and Work and Income is ensuring that its job bank is available across the country and provides a wider range of information.’
      • ‘These banks are maintained for all those in need, not to store blood for any particular potential recipient.’
      • ‘Many were tested on the huge bank of prepared specimen slides Joyce had assembled in the deep freezes in Newcastle.’
      • ‘We are also concerned about the emergence of essay banks on the Internet.’
      store, reserve, accumulation, stock, stockpile, inventory, supply, pool, fund, cache, hoard, deposit
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 A site or receptacle where something may be deposited for recycling:
      ‘a paper bank’
      • ‘On an ongoing basis, there are bottle and can banks near the library, so you can recycle those materials as often as suits your needs.’
      • ‘The Salvation Army is hoping it will be able to re-use many of the items deposited in its recycling banks.’
      • ‘There has been an alarming increase in illegal dumping at the recycling banks at Merville.’
      • ‘Limerick Community Council has advised that recycling banks are now in place at the car park at Twohig's Supervalu, Killarney Road.’
      • ‘It is first time that aluminium foil has been collected at the council's recycling centres, though Eden Community Recycling already has banks at its own sites.’
      • ‘Christmas cards should not be put in recycling boxes or paper banks.’
      • ‘A total of 20 shoe recycling banks have been introduced by South Lakeland District Council across the district to encourage more people to put their old shoes to a good use.’
      • ‘A paper recycle bank is placed at the amenity site.’
      • ‘But can, paper and textile banks will remain at the site near the Buck Inn unless a new home can be found for all the recycling bins.’
      • ‘The public is also reminded not to leave bags or boxes at the recycling banks.’
      • ‘There are also recycling banks for glass, paper and clothing as well as an area for fridges and freezers.’
      • ‘He said it had also been agreed to have a book bank at the site.’
      • ‘To find out more, or for details of your nearest bottle or paper banks, contact the city council's special recycling helpline on 01904 636000.’
      • ‘The other new recycling banks are located in Aughagower, Manulla and Westport.’
      • ‘The council capitulated and had the paper bank moved to a ‘safer’ site - the car park near Acomb Park shops.’
      • ‘If you do not compost at home the shredded paper can be put in the paper bank at your nearest recycling facility.’
      • ‘Under the scheme, people take bottles to the banks for subsequent re-cycling.’
      • ‘People can dispose of it in a paper bank or household recycling centres.’
      • ‘Villages currently not part of the kerbside recycling scheme all have access to paper recycling banks.’
      • ‘The provision of ten recycling banks was commended by the judging panel but they saw weed control as a problem at Barrack Street near the junction with the Tullow Road.’
    3. 1.3the bank The store of money or tokens held by the banker in some gambling or board games.
      • ‘The bank can also change hands after any hand if the existing banker wishes to sell the bank to another player at a mutually agreed price.’
      • ‘If everyone has played and there is money in the bank, the banker deals a new hand in the opposite direction from the hand that has just ended.’
    4. 1.4 The person holding the bank in some gambling or board games; the banker.
      • ‘Agreed, Mark, they do charge a five percent commission when you bet the bank hand in baccarat, but only when you win.’
      • ‘Here the bank would take half the money that had been staked on the paired cards.’
      • ‘Additionally, you can only be the banker for one hand, after which the bank reverts to the dealer for the next hand.’

verb

  • 1[with object] Deposit (money or valuables) in a bank:

    ‘she may have banked a cheque in the wrong account’
    • ‘This includes people required to conduct collections in local supermarkets, count and bank the money.’
    • ‘A £10,000 cheque will be banked by Sunday's victors from the FA's prize fund with the prospect of much more to follow if Saturday's draw proves favourable.’
    • ‘All we need now is for people to place the boxes during the last two weeks of February then collect them in at the beginning of April and bank the money.’
    • ‘His vendor will then bank the money - and it may be loaned to someone else.’
    • ‘It was only obvious to me because I have been banking money for many years, but I think nine out of ten people would be fooled by it.’
    • ‘The money is banked in the form of commuter credits, which employees can use to buy bike parts at a 10% discount.’
    • ‘Minimise idle cash balances by banking money quickly and seeking best investment rates.’
    • ‘Sell our home now, bank our profit, and rent a property until the local market looks attractive once more.’
    • ‘‘If they banked that money the government would have cut their grant for the following year,’ John explained.’
    • ‘Obviously, we banked the money because we didn't know whether or not it was a donation.’
    • ‘We need people to collect in local supermarkets and count and bank the money.’
    • ‘It was only too clear that a few of them were simply banking the salary from the Observer and then getting extra work from TV, radio and other publications.’
    • ‘That was replaced by ‘bills of exchange’ except that there is evidence that the money was banked for the $10 initial capital of each of the funds.’
    • ‘Rather we mean those who spend the morning banking their dividend cheques and the afternoon at the gym, on the tennis court or at the club.’
    • ‘By the time the cheque has been banked, the PO box has closed and the ‘company’ has moved on.’
    • ‘The first recommendation I would make is that the Minister stops banking the money that he thinks he will get from the department, because he is very unlikely to get it.’
    • ‘Street kids in Nepal are now being given the opportunity to bank their money, so that bigger kids won't beat them up and steal it.’
    • ‘Crackdowns by the Criminal Assets Bureau have made criminals reluctant to bank their money in the republic.’
    • ‘You filled in various documents of a minor nature, banked money and signed cheques.’
    • ‘The only problem is, normal economic dealings use high-powered supercomputers and economic analysts to make sure that the money is banked correctly.’
    have an account at, deposit one's money with, use, be a customer of, deal with, do business with
    deposit, pay in
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[no object] Have an account at a particular bank:
      ‘the family has banked with Coutts for generations’
      • ‘And oh no, the poor bank had to give out some free coffee to someone who doesn't bank with them.’
      • ‘Mr Gibson also checked Bryant family accounts at Lismore after I mentioned that my father banked with the ANZ.’
      • ‘Unfortunately most of us bank with the four main banks and we just can't be bothered to switch.’
      • ‘The two farmers banked with the Limavady branch of Ulster Bank where a Mr Sparks and a Mr Wallace were manager and assistant manager respectively.’
      • ‘Having recently arrived from the UK, where I banked with HSBC, I could see many ways for the Bank of Bermuda to improve their service.’
      • ‘It is usual for the parents to bank with the financial institution granting the mortgage and they may be asked to have part of the guarantee on deposit.’
      • ‘I bank with Coutts and I have a personal banker who is really good.’
      • ‘Does this mean that in the future we will all have to bank with ‘The Bank of Safeway’ in order to buy groceries?’
      • ‘I bank with Alliance & Leicester, which offers travel insurance as part of its account service.’
      • ‘Early stage and start up companies that bank with AIB will qualify for a 30 per cent discount on Sage products.’
      • ‘We regret very deeply the anxiety it will cause a large number of patients who have banked with us.’
      • ‘Lance Armstrong has the friendship of the President of the United States, an adoring, bright-eyed family and millions banked with Chase Manhattan.’
      • ‘The majority of these respondents now banked with a non-bank financial institution or a community bank.’
      • ‘I would still like to say, proudly, that I bank with the Bank of Scotland.’
      • ‘Like my father, I've always banked with Barclays.’
      • ‘In fact, the newly-merged charity Cancer Research UK continues to bank with the Royal Bank of Scotland among others.’
      • ‘Around a third of people have banked with the same institution for more than 20 years and almost half have stayed loyal to the same account for life.’
      • ‘It's possible these days to bank with an institution for years and only enter a branch once.’
      • ‘I have banked with Cahoot for several years, and this incident will not change my opinion about the value of online banking.’
      • ‘Consider getting your card through the financial institution you bank with.’
    2. 1.2informal Win or earn (a sum of money):
      ‘he banked £100,000 for a hole-in-one’
      • ‘Like Locke, Rodriguez also banked the most cash in his category, earning $523,445.’
      • ‘This suggests that South Africans are not banking any of the gains being offered from our interest rate bonanza.’
      • ‘A candidate who can bank those sums is not only a threat to win, but a threat to disrupt the rules by which campaigns are run, paid for, and won.’
      • ‘They moved to Nevada, built a beautiful new dream home, which they paid off completely, and still banked a hefty sum after taxes.’
      • ‘Nigel thankfully revealed a year later that had he cooled his affair with Baltimore and had banked some ‘significant gains’.’
    3. 1.3 Store (something, especially blood, tissue, or sperm) for future use:
      ‘the sperm is banked or held in storage for the following spring’
      • ‘It is known that we can safely collect sperm samples for sperm banking up to twenty days after the start of chemotherapy.’
      • ‘We typically recommend checking every 3 months, and we offer sperm banking based upon the quality of the sample.’
      • ‘A third patient explained that, like me, he had no desire to father children but felt that by banking sperm he was in some way ‘preserving his masculinity.’’
      • ‘It would also help men too ill to bank sperm before chemotherapy.’
      • ‘Part of the work we do as a charity is to reassure men that they can have sperm banked, but now there will obviously be a fear that it won't work.’
      • ‘There are smaller satellite clinics that might do limited sperm banking.’
      • ‘Many in the field of reproductive medicine shared his hopes and fears as well as his fascination with the eugenic potential of sperm banking.’
      • ‘Trevor, 42, an engineer, banked the sperm in 1979, at the age of 17.’
      • ‘The sperm they banked would be the difference between having a family or not now that radiation therapy has destroyed their body's healthy cells.’
      • ‘Program review should be performed at least annually to ensure ongoing compliance with regulations and safe tissue banking practices.’
      • ‘In spite of what my logical brain was telling me, I think there was a nagging doubt that if I did not bank some sperm I might later regret the decision.’
      • ‘Previously banked cord blood samples were identified for both patients, however were too small to be used.’
      • ‘My feeling is that the patient should be adequately counseled regarding the risks and benefits as well as the possibility of sperm banking.’
      • ‘Hunter will undergo a CT scan to assess the extent of his cancer on Tuesday, and also said he planned to bank sperm before beginning his chemotherapy.’
      • ‘CCF has been collecting male cheetahs since 1996 and has sperm banked over 90 male cheetahs.’
      • ‘He was a very successful business man who turned to sperm banking, and he realized he had to sell to this customers.’
      • ‘Tissue and bone banking poses significant risks to recipients if errors are made.’
      • ‘Administrative personnel should be familiar with this document and its application to the components of tissue banking performed.’

Phrases

  • the bank of mum and dad

    • informal (especially in the context of property purchase) a person's parents regarded as a source of financial assistance or support:

      ‘they face a lifetime of renting unless the Bank of Mum and Dad is willing to help out’
      • ‘Regarding the flat, it's a combination of the bank of Mum and Dad, some inheritance money, a large mortgage, and my savings.’
      • ‘The 'Bank of Mum and Dad' never closes.’
      • ‘The business of the Bank of Mum and Dad is fraught with moral and practical questions.’
      • ‘However, increasingly poor affordability and likely cutbacks at the Bank of Mum and Dad may cause the rate of house price growth to move back into single digits in the latter part of the year.’
      • ‘Parents stumping up all or some of the money for their children to put down on a property is the most common way the Bank of Mum and Dad is coming through for first-time buyers.’
      • ‘Furthermore, the bank of mum and dad carries on well into adulthood, it seems.’
      • ‘They borrow money from the Bank of Mum and Dad, which most will never repay.’
      • ‘Children or grandchildren like the Bank of Mum and Dad because they have to jump through fewer hoops to get their money and the repayment terms may be easier.’
      • ‘According to the survey, most students will not be able to count on help from the Bank of Mum and Dad.’
      • ‘Few people can expect the 'Bank of Mum and Dad' to bail them out if borrowing costs rise.’
  • break the bank

    • 1(in gambling) win more money than is held by the bank:

      ‘winning the pools was the equivalent of breaking the bank at Monte Carlo’
      • ‘He breaks the bank, but when he offers Paulina the money to buy off the marquis, she is ashamed and hurls it back at him in disgust.’
      • ‘On the drive home, I kept chuckling and whistling, ‘He's the man who broke the bank at Monte Carlo’!’
      1. 1.1informal [usually with negative]Cost more than one can afford:
        ‘at £30, the shirts won't break the bank’
        • ‘One might argue that some of the existing members just wouldn't be able to afford it but would £1 per week really break the bank?’
        • ‘The cost of fitted shelves and units can break the bank.’
        • ‘Four important players were making next to nothing, allowing the team to win without breaking the bank.’
        • ‘However, a week in the fjords in summer or cross-country skiing in winter doesn't have to break the bank, and many tour operators offer affordable packages.’
        • ‘You could still afford an exclusive bridal service without breaking the bank!’

Phrasal Verbs

  • bank on

    • Rely on confidently:

      ‘the prime minister cannot bank on their support’
      • ‘Instead, it says simply, ‘Trust us,’ and banks on our fear of terror and ambivalence toward the rules of justice to ensure we do exactly that without asking too many hard questions.’
      • ‘Dr Greenspan professes to being ‘deeply distressed’ to learn accountants are ratifying dodgy figures because he always banked on their integrity.’
      • ‘His 12 league goals have earned a huge chunk of the 25 survival points they have already amassed and they are banking on him securing a fair few more before the season is out.’
      • ‘Terry Dolan is banking on the York City faithful to raise the roof at Filbert Street and roar the Minstermen on to success in tomorrow's FA Cup clash with Leicester City.’
      • ‘This means taking measures that do not bank on doctoring figures and introducing cosmetic measures, as was done in the case of poverty reduction figures.’
      • ‘I beat the pre-holiday rush to the temple of gadgets to buy some paint and ended up buying a bargain hammock instead - but I'm not banking on much relaxation.’
      • ‘But its producers are banking on the Chardonnay becoming the miracle longed for by the calorie-counting female wine-bar generation.’
      • ‘I have had them before in the past and never done anything about it so I'm banking on the fact that as I'm still here, it's just something that happens now and then.’
      • ‘Strong trial results sent the Nasdaq-quoted shares flying last week, causing pain to a bunch of short-sellers who were banking on a price collapse.’
      • ‘Others were banking on more modest pensions, such as £16,000 or £7,000.’
      • ‘Now he is one of only 11 players to earn a central contract and England are banking on him to be a central figure in their World Cup plans.’
      • ‘Microsoft no doubt knows this, but is presumably banking on most users going along with the process, as they've tended to do in the past.’
      • ‘The space could be let for £5,000 - £6,000 a year, but it is the capital growth that investors are banking on.’
      • ‘Talk about such novel ventures and you sure can bank on the support of Revathy Menon, film actress.’
      • ‘Spice 21, nice though the food was, never seemed overly busy whenever I walked past, so it would seem the new owners are banking on the buffet to bring in the business.’
      • ‘The number seven seed will have her work cut out against seed Fionna Geaves, but like Taylor will be banking on the support of the home crowd.’
      • ‘Other parts of Scotland will see their fire cover reduced even more substantially as the government banks on the country's 4,000 part-time and volunteer firefighters to resist the strike call.’
      • ‘Mr Burr, who has already invested £250,000 of his own money in the project, was banking on Didcot power station buying his processed crop.’
      • ‘Red Hat and Mandrake are clearly banking on support contracts and installations of their advanced server products to generate revenue.’
      • ‘Instead, Microsoft are banking on the triple-core to handle those kinds of calculations.’
      rely on, depend on, count on, place reliance on, bargain on, plan on, reckon on, calculate on, presume on
      anticipate, expect, pin one's hopes on, hope for, take for granted, take as read, take on trust
      be confident of, have confidence in, have every confidence in, place confidence in, place one's confidence in, be sure of, pin one's faith on, trust in
      figure on
      View synonyms

Origin

Late 15th century (originally denoting a money dealer's table): from French banque or Italian banca, from medieval Latin banca, bancus, of Germanic origin; related to bank and bench.

Pronunciation

bank

/baŋk/