Definition of banana in English:

banana

noun

  • 1A long curved fruit which grows in clusters and has soft pulpy flesh and yellow skin when ripe.

    ‘a bunch of bananas’
    • ‘The main goods produced for sale are agricultural products such as corn, sweet potatoes, bananas, and citrus fruit.’
    • ‘The procedure should make artificial chemical ripening less necessary for apples, bananas and most stone fruits now treated with ethylene.’
    • ‘Apologies to Marcia for not bringing the agreed birthday present of a bunch of overly ripe bananas.’
    • ‘There were two large, pastel yellow clusters of bananas on the counter.’
    • ‘Now I have a pint of hot water with a touch of lemon, then two pieces of fruit like a banana and apple.’
    • ‘They also love ripe melons and bananas and grapes.’
    • ‘You may also eat one or two pieces of fruit, such as bananas, cantaloupe or pears.’
    • ‘Towers started a fruit farm, growing bananas and avocados.’
    • ‘For fresh fruit, bananas, apples and pears will be high on the list of priorities, but consider chopping up fresh mango, papaya or peaches into a small pot.’
    • ‘Oranges, apples, and bananas comprise half the fruit consumed.’
    • ‘Rice, bananas, and citrus fruits replaced the traditional crops of sugar, coffee, and cocoa.’
    • ‘Farmers grow corn, cassava, peanuts, bananas, and citrus fruits for their own consumption.’
    • ‘Carpeted by rich volcanic ash, the region's moist and misty vales cradle Panama's coffee industry and also produce some of the country's finest citrus fruits and bananas.’
    • ‘You might also want to mix in some slices of ripe bananas or the fruit of an avocado for a better deep conditioning treatment.’
    • ‘Her eyes widened when she saw the bright orange pumpkins, the ripe yellow bananas, silks with colors that she had never before seen.’
    • ‘You will feel the warmth of the sunshine, the smell of the salty sea, blending and mixing with the fragrance of flowers and the essence of bananas and ripe fruit.’
    • ‘Choose low-fiber foods such as ground meats, ripe bananas, soft cereals or refined bread.’
    • ‘The favorite fresh fruits of Canadians are bananas and apples.’
    • ‘There is a vast range of specific color truths: ripe bananas are yellow; certain sunsets are golden; claret wine is claret red and so on.’
    • ‘He said when students are finished eating apples or bananas in the school they bring the cores and skins to the composter.’
    severely mentally ill, mentally ill, insane, mad, certifiable, deranged, demented, of unsound mind, out of one's mind, not in one's right mind, not together, crazed, maniac, maniacal, lunatic, unbalanced, unhinged, unstable, disturbed, distracted, stark mad, manic, frenzied, raving, distraught, frantic, hysterical, delirious, mad as a hatter, mad as a march hare
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  • 2The tropical and subtropical palm-like plant which bears bananas, having very large leaves but lacking a woody trunk.

    • ‘Here, people cultivate the ensete plant, which looks like a banana tree, but its trunk pulp is prepared and eaten.’
    • ‘As it is we only lost a banana tree, a few shrubs and a section of the fence.’
    • ‘A banana plant in our back yard has produced green fruit about 7 inches long.’
    • ‘Leaves of the drumstick plant and the core stump of the banana plant, which are available locally, are a rich source of nutrients and fibres.’
    • ‘The dough is wrapped in the broad leaf of the banana plant, which is singed in boiling water and allowed to steam until cooked.’
    • ‘I've read on one website that in the Stone Age, magic properties were concealed in the leaves of a banana tree.’
    • ‘The effigy is usually a banana tree trunk dressed up in expensive clothes and made to look like a real human figure wearing a hat or crown, though the face is covered with cloth.’
    • ‘I take one plant that has a really good, striking form and then design around it, such as my banana tree.’
    • ‘The whole scene takes place beneath the boughs of a pine tree, the trunk of which, along with a garden rock and a banana tree, fills the left half of the composition.’
    • ‘Pinzote, the stalk of the banana tree, was once dumped into Costa Rican rivers, but is now made into smooth, faintly speckled paper.’
    • ‘I heard of one gardener in North Carolina who protected his banana plant in his front yard by surrounding the plant with bags and bags of leaves.’
    • ‘The ceremony included the setting up of a very colourful tree - resembling a banana tree, which had a number of colourful dolls hanging from the leaves.’
    • ‘Vivienne's smile turned wistful and she turned to snap a picture of sunlight filtering through the leaves of a banana tree.’
    • ‘Konglang taught the crew to cook rice in a length of bamboo and how to hollow out the core of a banana tree for fresh water.’
    • ‘For some reason the Spaniards saw a likeness between the banana tree and the totally different plane tree, which is how the plantain got its confusing name.’
    • ‘He would cut the leaves off the banana tree and place them on the ground.’
    • ‘The banana plant is actually a giant weed of the tropical jungle that grows with incredible speed.’
    • ‘At the side of the house I had a pomegranate tree that bore more than thirty fruit every season and a banana tree that never produced a thing.’
    • ‘A few years ago the former policewoman, who once lived in Arizona, US, planted a banana plant in a pot.’
    • ‘In the cemetery complex, a banana tree stands, but it is not an ordinary banana tree.’

Phrases

  • go (or be) bananas

    • 1informal Become (or be) mad or extremely silly.

      ‘everyone's beginning to think I'm bananas’
      • ‘And back in his old stomping grounds of Graz the politicians went bananas.’
      • ‘A Burnley headteacher has gone bananas and accused the Government of letting down needy children by leaving them out of a scheme to provide pupils with free fruit.’
      • ‘Have they all gone bananas at the Banana Warehouse in Piccadilly, York?’
      • ‘This is a case of political correctness gone bananas and I have appealed against the committee's decision.’
      • ‘My parents thought I'd gone bananas and were on the point of taking me to a psychiatrist.’
      1. 1.1Become extremely angry or excited.
        ‘she went bananas when I said I was going to leave the job’
        • ‘And remember how the sophisticated world media went bananas over the Californian gubernatorial election circus?’
        • ‘A woman standing on the bank was going bananas and screaming.’
        • ‘I never really got close to executing the plan because the market was pretty much going bananas over the low mortgage rates.’
        • ‘The Polynesian grappler immediately went bananas and came after me, but I slipped into the locker room, shut the door, and locked it.’
        • ‘Sections of the farming community are going bananas about quarantine today.’
  • top (or second) banana

    • informal The most (or second most) important person in an organization.

      ‘a top banana of the Mafia’
      • ‘Now he'll be the second banana on a team that won't be nearly as good.’
      • ‘He also had a daytime series in the style of Dave Garroway, for whom he once worked as second banana and comedy relief.’
      • ‘She's far better at a lead role like this than as a second banana, and that's probably the key to why So Close is such a good film.’
      • ‘I continued to hone my second banana routine that started in high school and has served me faithfully ever since.’
      • ‘This longtime second banana is finally a leader for the improving Thrashers.’
      • ‘But once she starts working in Los Angeles, she may become the movies’ or TV's next great second banana.’
      • ‘Do you miss the media referring to you as ‘a second banana with appeal’?’
      • ‘Can the second banana deliver a rousing partisan stump speech guaranteed to excite the party faithful?’
      • ‘Perry, as far as films goes, is a born second banana.’
      • ‘In the De Niro flick, his second banana is Edward Burns, a serious young actor with a fairly good track record, but very little audience recognition.’
      • ‘There's a huge difference in being a second banana all your career and in being the No.1 option having to adapt to a secondary role.’
      • ‘Gira's originals play second banana, occupying the record's back third.’
      • ‘It's real easy for a second banana, as he was with Gleason, to get typed at that level and in those kinds of roles, but Carney made it out.’
      • ‘I have to say that I did my best as second banana during the Elsinore affair.’
      • ‘From now on he accompanied his new lord through numerous adventures and battles as the faithful vassal and second banana.’
      • ‘They are the stars, and they're going to talk with SHOWBIZ TONIGHT about their breakout roles and what it's like to play second banana to a great ape.’
      • ‘Here we have Enon, the band of guitarist/vocalist/keyboardist John Schmersal, former second banana in a little outfit called Brainiac.’
      • ‘His statistics as a second banana indicate that he may regain the No.1 throne someday soon.’
      celebrity, famous person, very important person, personality, name, big name, famous name, household name, star, superstar, celebutante, leading light, mogul, giant, great, master, king, guru
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Origin

Late 16th century: via Portuguese or Spanish from Mande.

Pronunciation

banana

/bəˈnɑːnə/