Definition of baloney in English:

baloney

noun

informal
  • 1[mass noun] Foolish or deceptive talk; nonsense:

    ‘I don't buy it—it's all a load of baloney’
    • ‘The explanation that the public isn't really interested is pure baloney.’
    • ‘Our ‘content’ should be at all times inept, obscure, bluff, diatribe, baloney, codswallop or at worst irrelevant.’
    • ‘‘Clump of cells’ is baloney, as I have argued in my article ‘What Does It Mean to Be Human?’’
    • ‘Based on my own experience, I think that's a load of baloney.’
    • ‘Their decision tells my critics, ‘You're full of baloney!’’
    • ‘Essentially, the charter is just a load of baloney.’
    • ‘It has failed, it is a hoax, and it is a load of baloney.’
    • ‘The mainstream media swallow spin and purvey it according to the adage, ‘If you can't dazzle them with brilliance, baffle them with baloney.’’
    • ‘I'm filling in any factual gaps w / baloney, but the story goes something like this: maybe something like 200 healthy laboratory rats were inadvertently thrown out at the dump.’
    • ‘Just when it looked like the magic of the cup was being exposed as a load of old baloney, the substitute required only three minutes to underline his faith in it.’
    • ‘‘That's the biggest load of baloney,’ Cantor said.’
    • ‘It's called postmodernism and, among other things, it claims that all ideas are relative, that all science is baloney and that pretty much any reality is just a ‘social construct.’’
    • ‘Well I don't quite get Ancram's point, but I do get the Indy's, and it is a typical piece of baloney.’
    • ‘When the truth comes out about these charges against me, people will find out all this baloney doesn't stand.’
    • ‘‘The argument's baloney,’ Scott snaps, displaying a rare flash of irritation.’
    • ‘Economists who claim it is already the second largest in the world are talking baloney and not using real dollars to measure the economy but an economist's dream called parity purchasing power.’
    • ‘This thing about them not going well is a load of baloney.’
    • ‘I might consider myself a spiritual person - if someone could offer me a coherent definition of the term - but I'm basically an atheist, and feel wholly detached from all this heated baloney.’
    • ‘No nonsense, no baloney, not a lot of fanfare, and it's proceeding very quickly.’
    • ‘All that Architectural Space Social Engineering stuff that was so optimistically babbled about back when I sweated through my lectures all those years ago was, and always will be, baloney.’
  • 2

    North American term for bologna
    • ‘My position was put at risk after I put a baloney sandwich into, what I seem to be aware of now, a ‘dairy only’ shared toaster, near which there are no signs of warning.’
    • ‘Some of the entries are several-page stories, while others are simply five-word lists that say it all: ‘Beer, meat, dog food, baloney.’’
    • ‘C'mon, he threw baloney on her kitchen ceiling!’
    • ‘Paula and Cindy made up little songs about white bread and baloney; Daphne hummed the same Outkast line ad nauseam, and I rhapsodized about the Indian food I'd eat when I left.’
    • ‘Unwrapping my baloney sandwich and taking a bite, I tried peeking over the stone edge, trying to get into a good position where I could watch Oz in peace without his friends spotting me.’
    • ‘Joe ordered two packs of baloney from the store with the intention that we could save big money and use some for lunchmeat, so earlier this week I obligingly made myself a sandwich to take to work.’
    • ‘She was eating her usual meal, a baloney sandwich, an apple, a soda, and a two-pack cupcake.’
    • ‘Mortodella (from which we get our boloney) comes from Bologna.’
    • ‘And provided you don't come foisting your legumes on me, I won't slap you with my baloney.’
    • ‘If you are lucky, you may have had the rough equivalent of a baloney sandwich a day.’
    • ‘Then, what is required is that the guest munch on a small hunk of baloney, toss back a shot of screech (a local alcoholic beverage that warms the belly fast), and, to seal the deal one must kiss a cod.’
    • ‘We'll split the baloney sandwich, but I got dibs on the chips!’
    • ‘The bread was dark and thick, baked by an Italian mother in Brooklyn, bread firm enough to hold slices of a rich baloney, layered with slices of tomato, onions and peppers, drizzled with olive oil and charged with a tongue-dazzling relish.’
    • ‘Mr. Watson is dead now but I still love this record, especially the part where he's in the baloney section of the grocery store complaining about the prices.’
    • ‘I didn't realise that everybody else was eating baloney sandwiches.’
    • ‘Well, folks, it's nowhere near as hard as trying to unwrap a baloney and cheese sandwich or open a bag of Fritos.’
    • ‘If I give you a pound of baloney, a loaf of bread and a table to eat it on, I don't hold you anymore.’
    • ‘The one mistake I made was actually tasting some of the baloney.’

Origin

1920s: baloney said to be a corruption of bologna.

Pronunciation:

baloney

/bəˈləʊni/