Main definitions of bail in English

: bail1bail2bail3

bail1

noun

  • 1[mass noun] The temporary release of an accused person awaiting trial, sometimes on condition that a sum of money is lodged to guarantee their appearance in court:

    ‘he has been released on bail’
    • ‘Matysiak, who gave the court her mother's address in Axbridge Close, Park North, was released on bail by the crown court so reports can be compiled on her.’
    • ‘The young man was finally released on bail when a Supreme Court judge ruled that he posed no risk to the community.’
    • ‘The defendants were released on bail at Cork District Court yesterday for sentencing on February 15.’
    • ‘A Kirkwall man was released on bail from Kirkwall Sheriff Court on Tuesday after pleading guilty to assault and breach of the peace.’
    • ‘Charged with credit-card fraud and identity theft, most of the suspects arrested that day have been released on bail pending trial.’
    • ‘Magistrates adjourned sentencing for reports and released him on bail, with conditions he must not enter Leisure World or any public changing cubicles.’
    • ‘The appellants were released on bail having spent approximately 7 months in custody.’
    • ‘Howley was charged with the first of these alleged offences on Friday - two days after he was released on bail from Kirkwall Sheriff Court for a catalogue of admitted crimes.’
    • ‘Johannes allegedly has a history of petty crime and was out on bail awaiting court proceedings against him.’
    • ‘The Court of Appeal yesterday released Mr Sheikh on bail to await its decision next month on whether the case against him should go before a new jury.’
    • ‘When Kemmache sought release on bail once again, this was refused by the Assize Court.’
    • ‘The vast majority of the defendants pleaded not guilty and were released on bail with strict conditions.’
    • ‘Wally, who was still on bail awaiting trial for unlawful possession of firearms and ammunition, got away with a small fine.’
    • ‘All the motorists were detained and released on bail and appeared in court in Umtata yesterday.’
    • ‘The girl is charged with manslaughter and is on bail awaiting trial.’
    • ‘A child or young person may be either released on bail or remanded to local authority accommodation.’
    • ‘He was released on bail and made one appearance at the local magistrates' court, but was not seen after that.’
    • ‘I think it was made clear that after their arrest they were on bail and their bail conditions prevented them having any contact with her.’
    • ‘However, there is an increasing tendency to free the indictee on bail, provided guarantees are given by the relevant State authorities that he will not be allowed to escape.’
    • ‘A man who struck his wife during the course of a row was released on bail at Carlow District Court on February 28.’
    surety, security, collateral, assurance, indemnity, indemnification
    bond, guarantee, warranty, pledge
    gage, earnest
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Money paid by or for someone in order to secure their release on bail:
      ‘they feared the financier would be tempted to forfeit the £10 million bail and flee’
      • ‘The great grandson of the famed make-up artist was supposed to be wearing an electronic tracking device while free on $1 million bail.’
      • ‘The couple's bail money, totalling HK $1.25 million, was forfeited and warrants issued for their arrest.’
      • ‘He has pleaded not guilty and is free on almost €3 million bail.’
      • ‘Cullen said he did not want a lawyer, and was held on US $1 million bail.’
      • ‘He is currently being held at Salem County Correctional Facility in lieu of $1.8-million bail.’
      • ‘He was briefly arrested last month before being released on US $3 million bail.’
      • ‘He was charged with sexual abuse and freed on £1.87 million bail.’
      • ‘High bail - reaching as much as $1 million - was imposed for those arrested by police.’
      • ‘I would think they should set a bail - probably the bail schedule calls for a $1 million bail.’
      • ‘He is free on £1.87 million bail and at an ‘undisclosed location’, believed to be in Las Vegas.’
      • ‘Two days later he was spotted again at the tournament and taken into custody, his bail set at $2 million.’
      • ‘His family today confirmed they cannot pay the five million drachma bail money which has been set by the judges presiding over his case.’
      • ‘If one of the world's most famous entertainers did not show up in one hour, he would be sent to jail, losing $3 million bail.’
      • ‘By Friday, he had not lodged security for his R2 million bail and remained confined to his plush home.’
      • ‘He's on $1-million bail, after police corruption allegations delayed his committal hearing.’
      • ‘He was later arrested and is in prison with bail set at three million euros.’
      • ‘The group has been arraigned, with bail for one member set at $10 million.’
      • ‘He said he'll sentence Mathis to thirty years with bail at about five million.’
      • ‘He is free on $3 million bail but must attend the court hearings daily.’
      • ‘The men are expected to be retried, although Cazares has been free on $1 million bail since August.’
      surety, security, collateral, assurance, indemnity, indemnification
      bond, guarantee, warranty, pledge
      gage, earnest
      View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Release or secure the release of (a prisoner) on payment of bail:

    ‘nine were bailed on drugs charges’
    [with object and infinitive] ‘he was bailed to appear at Durham Crown Court’
    • ‘All six men have been bailed to appear before Bradford Magistrates' Court on Friday.’
    • ‘Prisoners being bailed to return to the station will also be dealt with separately from those being kept in custody.’
    • ‘We see no necessity for a defendant who is bailed to be expressly warned that, if he absconds, he may be tried in his absence, for that has been the English common law for over a century.’
    • ‘He was bailed to appear at Swadlincote Magistrates' Court on 12 th October.’
    • ‘He has been bailed to appear at Swindon Youth Court on May 4.’
    • ‘The three were bailed to appear at Croydon Crown Court on June 10.’
    • ‘He was bailed to appear at his trial on 1 June 1998.’
    • ‘Two boys, aged 12 and 13, have been charged with criminal damage and have been bailed to appear at Salford youth court tomorrow.’
    • ‘The only reason we, the public, can think of as to why that man was bailed and not remanded in custody is that the prisons are full and there are not enough prison or remand beds to keep a man like that in custody for a length of time.’
    • ‘Both men have been bailed to appear at Bow Street Magistrates Court on March 2 when they will have an opportunity to enter a plea in the case.’
    • ‘He denied the charge and was bailed to appear on 10 June.’
    • ‘He was bailed to appear before Cheltenham magistrates on Wednesday.’
    • ‘A 20-year-old Lancaster man has been bailed to appear before magistrates in January in connection with a burglary at the park last month.’
    • ‘She was not charged but was unconditionally bailed to appear at Harrogate Police Station tomorrow.’
    • ‘Both were charged and have been bailed to appear at Ballina local court on February 22.’
    • ‘He was bailed to appear at York Crown Court for sentencing on the week beginning November 8.’
    • ‘Magistrates bailed the couple to appear before magistrates for committal proceedings on Monday, March 14 this year.’
    • ‘Six were cautioned, one was released without charge and three were bailed.’
    • ‘A spokesman said 16 of them would appear before magistrates in Grimsby and Cleethorpes today while another two were bailed to appear before magistrates tomorrow.’
    • ‘The girl has been bailed and will appear at Blackburn Youth Court on January 25.’

Phrases

  • go bail (or stand bail)

    • Act as surety for an accused person:

      ‘offering to stand bail for a guy who had been involved in a vicious attack’
      • ‘In the original classical legend it is Phintias (of which ‘Pythias’ is a corruption), not Damon, who is sentenced, and Damon goes bail for him.’
      • ‘For years I was cross-examined whenever I offered to stand bail.’
      • ‘The bail set can be substantial and there is, therefore, a financial incentive for the person who goes bail to ensure that the charged person turns up for trial.’
      • ‘His name had been linked to “Red Rioters” in the Providence Journal as a result of his having stood bail for Marx.’
      • ‘I stood bail for him and the other defendants at the Oz trial.’
      • ‘She posted herself outside the Marylebone Magistrates' Court and announced she would stand bail for anyone who needed it.’
      • ‘The men were taken to Inverness and held without trial, but Highlanders from all over Scotland rallied to their cause, standing bail for them and eventually paying their fines.’
      • ‘He cannot speak of integrity and loyalty when he did not even appear to stand bail for the No 1 couple in this country, Mr and Mrs Panday.’
      • ‘Many thanks also to the lawyers who did a good job and to the churchman who stood bail.’
      • ‘In the 1840s, Augustus stood bail for select offenders and promised to monitor their activities and report to the judge.’
  • jump bail

    • informal Fail to appear for trial after being released on bail:

      ‘he jumped bail and was on the run until his arrest’
      • ‘He also faces a charge of jumping bail and has been considered a fugitive since 1974.’
      • ‘After jumping bail to look after his terminally ill girlfriend, things change.’
      • ‘He was placed on a witness protection scheme but has now jumped bail and vanished.’
      • ‘In fact, it was probably you who told Mitchell to put Tris under arrest for jumping bail.’
      • ‘An east Yorkshire man who jumped bail after being arrested for drug smuggling eight years ago was jailed for six months yesterday.’
      • ‘Police have made a television appeal to find a Bedford accountant who jumped bail two years ago facing a £100,000 theft charge.’
      • ‘When both of them are set after the same slimy car thief who has jumped bail things get out of hand.’
      • ‘Nail was later sentenced to more than 20 years' jail for his part in the crime; the police believed King probably jumped bail.’
      • ‘Just last week, a California appellate court turned aside the appeal of Luster's conviction, saying he had forfeited his right to appeal by jumping bail.’
      • ‘He jumped bail right after the murders and was on the lamb for more than 20 years.’
  • post bail

    • Pay a sum of money as bail:

      ‘if a defendant can post bail and presents no threat, he should be allowed to await trial at home’
      • ‘Instead he has been detained since last Monday without any opportunity to appear before a judge or post bail.’
      • ‘So when his family posted bail after several months of pretrial detention, Tyson went looking for a reporter.’
      • ‘The two were taken into custody after failing to post bail of 50 million Nepalese rupees each, the reports said.’
      • ‘As news of the arrest spread, bail bond representatives crammed into the Soi 8 immigration office, looking to post bail for the Korean.’
      • ‘The singer, also famous in Japan, was arrested at his home in a Quezon City suburb but later freed after posting bail of 6,000 pesos.’
      • ‘The second time, at 11 p.m., they were able to post bail for Jennifer but were told that it would be several hours before she was released.’
      • ‘Failure to appear has tripled her posted bail, made them issue another warrant for her arrest, and gave even more cannon fodder to the media.’
      • ‘Prosecutors declined to comment on a judge's decision to release him after posting bail of just $15,000.’
      • ‘The construction worker was arrested and released after posting bail.’
      • ‘He was released after his lawyers assured the court he would post bail by September 8.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, literally custody, jurisdiction, from bailler take charge of, from Latin bajulare bear a burden.

Pronunciation:

bail

/beɪl/

Main definitions of bail in English

: bail1bail2bail3

bail2

noun

  • 1Cricket
    usually bailsEither of the two crosspieces bridging the stumps, which the bowler and fielders try to dislodge with the ball to get the batsman out:

    ‘the Lancashire captain was at full stretch as the wicketkeeper took off the bails’
    • ‘But something was wrong with the picture - the bails remained firmly on the wicket, despite the leaning leg stump.’
    • ‘With no batsman the aim is simply to hit the stumps or knock the bails off.’
    • ‘The ball jagged back viciously to shatter the stumps and send the bails flying.’
    • ‘The globe is presented in the form of a stylised cricket ball while the columns, styled as stumps and bails, represent the three essential pillars of the game - batting, bowling and fielding.’
    • ‘Only then did the umpires march out, remove the bails and stumps, and declare that England had won the Ashes.’
  • 2A bar on a typewriter or computer printer which holds the paper steady.

    • ‘The paper bail will be moved back to grip the paper against the platen.’
    • ‘The paper bail holds the paper down on top of the cylinder, or platen, that it's wound around.’
    • ‘Does the Paper Bail on the Mountbatten need to be used all the time?’
    • ‘One moves the paper bail and the other retracts the friction rollers and displaces the paper bail by about 3mm.’
    • ‘If not, it will catch on the bail arm as it advances.’
    • ‘Close and snap the carriage latch, and pull the bail arm back.’
    • ‘This Star model also happens to be a stripped version with no tabs, no see-through paper table (for margin set position,) no paper arms, and no paper bail.’
    • ‘A paper bail in a printer having a platen includes two bail levers rotatably mounted on the printer and pressed toward the platen by a spring.’
    • ‘Pull the bail arm toward the front of the printer.’
    • ‘Move the bail lever on top of the printer forward to open the paper bail.’
    • ‘Return the paper bail and the paper should now be positioned at the tear.’
    • ‘My folly was in thinking that the problem was that I was not getting the paper positioned properly under the paper bail.’
    • ‘The bail arm on this printer raises whilst the machine is printing.’
    • ‘When it is difficult to open the paper bail because of the position of the print head, close the printer.’
    • ‘The bail arm squeegees on your Gerber Digital Color Printing System may stick to the surface of Static Cling.’
  • 3Mountaineering
    A fastening that secures a crampon to the sole of a boot.

  • 4A bar or pole separating horses in an open stable.

    1. 4.1Australian, NZ A movable framework for securing the head of a cow during milking.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]Australian, NZ
  • 1usually bail someone upConfront (someone) with the intention of robbing them:

    ‘they bailed up Mr Dyason and demanded his money’
    • ‘Tom bails up Rupert and the two of them fight hard over who is most loyal to Rob.’
    • ‘It was a different story in the streets where, at least once, they were bailed up by police, summarily accused and punished, without any opportunity of putting their case.’
    • ‘John is then bailed up by the principal, who seems to enjoy this little power game with the always-late-to-school student.’
    • ‘At least I think that's what he's doing when he surges off to bail up bewildered passers-by.’
    • ‘I have seen a cat with an injured paw bail up strangers in the street, mewing and obviously demanding that she be treated.’
    1. 1.1 Detain (someone) in conversation, especially against their will:
      ‘students will bail up Canberrans on Friday for donations for the Royal Blind Society’
      • ‘A man bailed me up in a car park years ago, after a talk I'd given about war, to tell me his story.’
      • ‘Serena goes back to school where she is bailed up by Susan and questioned about her behaviour, especially in the teacher's class.’
      • ‘Before he can finish the call he's bailed up by a teacher, and sent to the office.’
      • ‘A deep-thinking man in our area bailed me up in January to give me a long dissertation about why this year was going to be wet.’
      • ‘One of our readers recently bailed me up and asked why we didn’t get into more investigative journalism.’
  • 2Secure (a cow) during milking.

    • ‘It's no good crying over spilt milk; all we can do is bail up another cow.’
    • ‘It is preferable not to bail the cow for insemination, so use a chain or rail.’
    • ‘Cows are bailed quietly and smoothly under close supervision.’
    • ‘He spent his time cattle herding and bailing the cows for the milkers.’

Origin

Middle English (denoting the outer wall of a castle): from Old French baile palisade, enclosure, baillier enclose, perhaps from Latin baculum rod, stick.

Pronunciation:

bail

/beɪl/

Main definitions of bail in English

: bail1bail2bail3

bail3

(British bale)

verb

  • 1[with object] Scoop water out of (a ship or boat):

    ‘the first priority is to bail out the boat with buckets’
    • ‘Until that happens, its like bailing a leaky boat to stay ahead of rising cost.’
    • ‘When they arrived, the sailors helped to bale out the 26 foot vessel and they were able to identify the cause of the problem as a leaking cooling pipe which was letting in the sea.’
    • ‘The original showed two men, without war gear, baling out a boat.’
    • ‘This feeling grows, too, from involvement in the work of maintaining camp - pitching in when cookout fires should be built, sailboats require bailing, and cabins need cleaning.’
    • ‘The race had ended and this crew was waiting to get out of the boat when I noticed the woman bailing.’
    • ‘Working deep in the hold we find the faithful ones who keep bailing the bilges without regard for the Mate's view on whether they should be doing it or not.’
    • ‘The storm increases, making it impossible to bail out the swamped boat.’
    1. 1.1 Scoop (water) out of a ship or boat:
      ‘I started to use my hands to bail out the water’
      • ‘The first time, the boat swamped with water and they had to race back to dry land along Lincoln Avenue to bail the water.’
      • ‘I had a pump going and I bailed water for 2 hours straight.’
      • ‘The woman sitting in the middle constantly bailed water out of the boat during the commute.’
      • ‘They flooded the cabin over and over, and bailed water constantly for 24 hours.’
      • ‘David held his tongue, started a quick search for something which would hold water, grabbed an old rusty bucket from the back locker and began bailing the water which was beginning to accumulate over the floorboards.’
      • ‘During the next three months 56 million gallons of water were bailed from the shaft while rehabilitation of the workings continued.’
      • ‘It is like Team New Zealand bailing water out of the boat - it did not matter.’
      • ‘On a fatal journey back to England a storm rocked his ship and as the crew and dismal captain bailed water from the ship, an amazing thing happened for John.’
      • ‘With your ice bucket, bail the water from the bath onto the door to keep it cool.’
      • ‘Meanwhile Blackburn, frantically seeking to empty the boat after a wave had swamped it, accidentally bailed his own mittens over the side.’
      • ‘They could control, for example, a character who stood in a pit in the pouring rain and had to bail the water from the pit with a bucket or drown.’
      • ‘Instead of turning off the tap, we're going to use pots and pans to bail water out of the tub.’
      • ‘The desperate men especially the oiler and the correspondent moved quick as they bailed water from the little boat.’
      • ‘Several members of the assisting-boat crew boarded the sinking fisher and helped bail the rising water.’
      • ‘Others were forced to bail water out of their properties.’
      • ‘Staff frantically tried to bail water out with buckets flowing the downpour yesterday afternoon.’
      • ‘That left the rest of the group to use their hands and a small rubber container to bail water out of the boat as they struggled to stay afloat.’
      • ‘When all the pumps failed, the five started trying to bail the water by hand.’
      • ‘Herel bailed water with one hand and clenched the ship’s side with the other.’
      • ‘‘The first phase was plugging the leaks, the second phase was to bail the water and now we are high in the water and going places,’ Shelton said.’
  • 2North American bail oninformal [no object] Let (someone) down:

    ‘he looks a little like the other guy that bailed on me’
    • ‘Their match seems to be one made in heaven, until Winslet mysteriously bails on the bond.’
    • ‘You know, I felt bad for bailing on New York today because of the transit strike.’
    • ‘So it turned out that Mieko's date had bailed on her.’
    • ‘At the stroke of 12: 00 she was just certain we had bailed on her and they would be without food for the wedding.’
    • ‘Seems D's blog buddy bailed on him, so I sent him a set of silly questions for this week, and he sent me ten sillier questions.’
    • ‘I bailed on Thursday's column, and tomorrow I'll have to go to the office, grab some letters, and write it at home.’
    • ‘We are not long away from hitting the sack and although my compatriots have bailed on me, I'm still going to go take pictures of cute alpacas in the morning before I have to face this meeting from hell.’
    • ‘I just think it's rather interesting that he seems to keep bailing on his relationship with her.’
    • ‘For anyone who's not aware, it's the story of a guy, Rob, who owns a record shop and has a tendency to bail on relationships before they bail on him.’
    • ‘I know that repeat business is earned on a daily basis, so don't bail on me yet.’
    • ‘Anyways… I'm still sorry about bailing on you guys at lunch… except well, Simon was there.’
    • ‘Jane bails on her career, becomes a temp and eventually lands a job in advertising.’
    • ‘Many noted that while the company had closed fewer than 40 stores in its 40-year history, it was closing a store in a similar part of Detroit on the same day it was bailing on the Hawthorne neighborhood.’
    • ‘So after bailing on the mass market DVD's, I went out and got me a copy - in the interest of journalistic research, you understand - of Cremaster 2 to watch at home.’
    • ‘It's the runaway bride, the Georgia woman who bailed on her wedding and took a bus to New Mexico, leaving behind her family and fiance, who feared the very worst.’
    • ‘This could be an option if your climbing partner bails on you and the traverse or boulder routes are a little too difficult.’
    • ‘She was not the kind of girl to bail on a meeting for a guy.’
    • ‘In fact, I'm more worried that you would choose to bail on me now, when I'm finally happy.’
    • ‘Guys who bail on a workout program conveniently allow themselves to forget why they started one in the first place.’
    • ‘Sorry for bailing on you folks so early in the evening.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • bail out

    • 1Make an emergency parachute descent from an aircraft.

      • ‘In spite of this heroic effort, Risner's friend drowned after bailing out of the stricken F - 86 and becoming entangled in the parachute lines.’
      • ‘Captain Heily believes he must have been at 250-or 300-ft when he bailed out.’
      • ‘This training is more commonly associated with fighter pilots forced to bail out over enemy territory.’
      • ‘He bailed out of the P - 51 and it was destroyed in the crash.’
      • ‘It was obvious to the airmen that, with its fuel almost spent, the aircraft had been set on automatic pilot and the crew bailed out.’
      • ‘Gilmore wore a parachute, and a cable from the trapdoor ran back to the control panel so that in an emergency both Turner and his pet could bail out.’
      • ‘Drill after drill had taught us that three short rings meant an emergency - one long continuous ring meant bail out!’
      • ‘When a young airman miraculously survives bailing out of his aeroplane without a parachute, he falls in love with an American radio operator.’
      • ‘The aircraft commander alerted the crew for possible bail out but did not get a response from the tail gunner.’
      • ‘Since the tail gunner could not possibly survive bailing out, I asked him to crash land if he could.’
      • ‘I hit him good and the pilot bailed out at 200 feet.’
      • ‘Homer, Bob, and Chet bailed out of the flaming B - 24.’
      • ‘It was just like in the movies when the Corsair takes a hit from the Zero, and the aircraft trails smoke just before the pilot bails out - except we didn't have parachutes, and this wasn't a movie.’
      • ‘The terrain was too rough for an emergency landing so I started to bail out.’
      • ‘The friendly territory added another dimension, since bailing out (if necessary) meant friends on the ground for a change.’
      • ‘Chief Arp asked the pilot for parachutes so we could bail out.’
      • ‘The Germans had recently begun equipping their pilots with parachutes, allowing them to bail out and, if they landed in friendly territory, return to fight another day.’
      • ‘It was on the 19th nine years ago, right to the hour, that I bailed out of the Super Corsair.’
      • ‘He was flying Spitfire R6614 and was able to bail out of his stricken aeroplane but was later found dead.’
      • ‘All ten men aboard Heaven Can Wait bailed out after an enemy fighter attack damaged the radio room with its 20 mm cannon, starting a fire - probably in the oxygen tanks.’
      • ‘The opening scenes of A Matter of Life and Death find squadron leader Peter Carter about to bail out of his burning aircraft.’
      rescue, save, relieve, deliver, redeem
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Withdraw from an obligation or commitment:
        ‘she felt ready to bail out of the corporate rat race’
        • ‘None of this means that we need to bail out of stock markets today.’
        • ‘Last week it emerged that the leases had get-out clauses allowing companies to bale out of commitments.’
        • ‘He wants to bail out of the airline, but may not get the government to pay the price he wants for his stake.’
        • ‘The flakiest clients are the most apt to bail out of a project, and so are the ones for whom we most need a written termination clause in our contracts.’
        • ‘As a consequence, many women writers bail out of the business.’
        • ‘You know you're in at the deep end in the world of rock and roll when two of your potential interviewees bail out of the interview in order to move the van so they don't get a ticket in Broad Street.’
        • ‘Many homeless people choose to bail out of our cosy little society and live on the streets, seeking shelter wherever they can, and doing what they have to do to stay alive.’
        • ‘If foreigners want to bail out of Asia, they are going to be selling out of Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan.’
        • ‘Given the political realities, anyone under the age of 50 should be agitating to bail out of the sinking ship and obtain the right to save money, rather than relying on the whims of the political process.’
        • ‘Because now he's done the time, Joe is ready to bail out of EastEnders and try his hand at something other than quivering his bottom lip and having bad facial hair.’
        • ‘Should I bail out of this line right now, or should I stick it out a bit longer and hope that the lady finds a working credit-card soon?’
        • ‘They didn't bail out of the covert program around the world because it's too valuable for us.’
        • ‘If you bail out of a B share within five years, you'll forfeit 0.5% to 2.5% of your money.’
        • ‘Problems arose with the pension fund eventually because the benefits kept expanding but the capture of prizes was highly variable, so that Congress had to bail out of the funds.’
        • ‘Ms Manners said women who feel isolated and puzzled by complicated legal talk are much more likely to bail out of cases.’
        • ‘And as the markets crash and investors bail out of equities, bigger players like ISIS, one of the host of erstwhile independents who have flown into the arms of beefier peers, also begin to look pathetically small.’
        • ‘What this does is save your virgin lungs for the long haul, because you can't bail out of a hotbox without getting the aforementioned teasing.’
        • ‘‘I am not suggesting we are going to bail out of any project but, as a business, you have to look at where your opportunities are,’ he said.’
        • ‘At this point Zack began to deliberately bail out of the sled, half to three-quarters of the way down the hill, pitching himself out and lying immobile in the snow.’
        • ‘Colina is essentially raising the premiums of their medical plan so high, that it will force them to bail out of it.’
        sell up, sell out, sell
        View synonyms
  • bail someone/thing out

    • Rescue someone or something from a difficulty:

      ‘the state will not bail out loss-making enterprises’
      • ‘It was a fantastic effort from a conference team which has to be baled out by unselfish fans who dug into their own pockets to keep the show on the road, and an example to all that the improbable is sometimes possible.’
      • ‘Narrow margins baled us out many days, and he questioned it all players made themselves available for the senior county panel.’
      • ‘Desmond had bailed him out of financial difficulties by lending him £46,000.’
      • ‘And if property prices are stagnant or falling, we cannot rely on the wealth in our homes to bale us out.’
      • ‘Not to mention he also had a pension for bailing the Agency out of it's roughest spots.’
      • ‘But they must know to what extent you will be able to bail them out if they get into financial difficulties.’
      • ‘For his part, the defendant repeatedly proclaimed his innocence, insisting he had dug deep into his own pockets to bail the church out of financial difficulties.’
      • ‘He had waded too far into the murky ocean that was her personal life, and was desperately searching for a lifeboat or rescue helicopter to bail him out.’
      • ‘Despite all the control, the Kleinites have been bailing health and school authorities out of deficits for years.’
      • ‘Were we dating, or were we just good friends who danced together, bailed each other out of trouble, fought constantly with one another and just happened to kiss every now and then?’
      • ‘Residential ratepayers, taxpayers, and employees are thus to bail the industry out of its difficulties.’
      • ‘She bailed herself out by going ahead, against her inclinations, with a television series Melcher had secretly signed her to and put herself through five years of sit-com paces on the little box.’
      • ‘Rather than bailing the recent college grad out of debt, the elder Wright suggested he find a second job.’
      • ‘Here they again work alongside Amy, who has also made the switch, and are baled out, financially, by their former boss Ruth, who becomes a sleeping majority shareholder in the firm.’
      • ‘They also passionately looked out for each other, bailing each other out and financing each other's debts.’
      • ‘Suzy found him there and bailed him out, bringing him home to all the other broken-winged inmates to sleep on the verandah until a bedroom came vacant.’
      • ‘Is it not a fraud, to pretend that Argentina can be bailed out, by saving the present obligations imposed upon Argentina?’
      • ‘Parents who bail their children out in difficult times are wonderful but wouldn't teaching them how to budget be better?’
      • ‘The overpowering love of Subhadra for her son and her efforts to bale him out of the mess makes for the rest of the story.’
      • ‘I couldn't believe I was actually bailing that little witch out.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from obsolete bail bucket, from French baille, based on Latin bajulus carrier.

Pronunciation:

bail

/beɪl/