Definition of badger-baiting in English:



  • [mass noun] A sport in which dogs draw a badger from its sett and kill it, illegal in the UK since 1830.

    • ‘At the end of the day all these reasons are just excuses for a ‘sport’ that should be classed with Bull-fighting, cock-fighting, dog-fighting, and badger-baiting, all of which are illegal in the United Kingdom.’
    • ‘Experts say badger baiting, outlawed since 1835, is on the rise in the Lothians, with at least one report a month.’
    • ‘Perhaps we should bring back badger-baiting, cock-fighting, the bear pit, and all of those other traditional English pursuits we ignorant townies have put a stop to.’
    • ‘The purpose: to put a stop to badger-baiting, a form of sport with dogs first outlawed in 1835.’
    • ‘West Yorkshire Police wildlife officer PC Steve Downing says intelligence gathered shows crimes such as badger-baiting, the theft of parrots and other species are often being carried out by those with links to the drugs world.’
    • ‘A wildlife group says that incidents of badger baiting in south east Wales have doubled in the last year.’
    • ‘It soon becomes clear that he has been married six times and his personal passions include musical theatre and badger-baiting.’
    • ‘The badger, a poem by John Clare, describes a badger baiting session in the early 1800s.’
    • ‘Police investigating alleged badger baiting in Lancashire arrest three men on suspicion of animal cruelty.’
    • ‘Badger baiting is a cruel and barbaric form of “blood sport”.’
    • ‘I've just worked on a badger-baiting for the RSPCA, and that to me is as important as any other case.’
    • ‘Badger baiting was made illegal in the UK in 1835, but still continues.’
    • ‘His work has encompassed everything from badger-baiting to the illegal trade in elephant ivory.’
    • ‘For centuries badgers have been victims of persecution by man, and in the old days, badger baiting was a popular spectator sport.’
    • ‘It's a bit like badger-baiting / cock-fighting etc from the point of the participant in my eyes.’
    • ‘Pain can be inflicted for punishment, sport (stag or fox-hunting), or amusement (bear or badger-baiting, dog or cock-fighting), or as an overt outlet for energy or sadistic gratification.’
    • ‘Most people in this country consider badger-baiting a horror and cock-fighting an abomination, but most of them think that fishing is mostly OK.’
    • ‘The second type of badger baiting involves gambling where large sums of money can change hands.’
    • ‘This has always been a black and white scenario for me, in the same league as clubbing seals or badger-baiting.’
    • ‘But I hope they can see that it is an emotive topic, but one which is qualitatively different to cockfighting, bull-fighting or badger-baiting.’