Definition of aviator in English:

aviator

noun

  • 1dated A pilot.

    • ‘Wildlife sightings reported by aircrew could save the lives of aviators on later flights.’
    • ‘Fighter management is a tool that keeps aviators and aircraft safe to fly another day.’
    • ‘We said no; our Air Force aircrews and naval aviators would do the job.’
    • ‘In order to do this for Air Force aviators, we need to transform our process for shaping future leaders.’
    • ‘In less than a month, we've lost two training aircraft and four aviators.’
    • ‘And with this new melding of pilots and drivers, we aviators should be able to continue as blind as many motorists.’
    • ‘The Air Force currently suffers from a critical shortage of aviators for manned aircraft.’
    • ‘In May of that year, several aviators were aggressively contending to be the first to get airborne in pursuit of this prize.’
    • ‘However, your routine instrument scan must be altered from aircraft to aircraft, which aviators know is not good.’
    • ‘Soon, we drifted into the comfort of two experienced aviators, and basic definitions weren't necessary.’
    • ‘An unidentified pilot could be no more than a private aviator who unknowingly sends out a wrong signal on his transponder.’
    • ‘Thus, the airline began training their aviators to become the world's finest pilots.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, the first Cirus Design entry continues to make friends among new pilots and old aviators alike.’
    • ‘The first enlisted aviators were trained by pilots who learned from the Wright brothers.’
    • ‘Although he was obviously a submariner, he was also a qualified aviator who frequently piloted the Flying Sub.’
    • ‘The Dutch pilot decided to stay with the other aviators, and they began to look around the field.’
    • ‘The American aviator Richard Byrd flew over the South Pole in 1929.’
    • ‘Launched in 1936, she took part in the one-month search for the lost aviator Amelia Earhart.’
    • ‘First, we expect them to master an aircraft system, since aviators fly to fight and lead from the front.’
    • ‘He was not the first aviator to bring a powered aircraft to Saigon.’
    airman, airwoman, flyer, aeronaut
    View synonyms
  • 2trademark in UK [as modifier] Denoting a style of sunglasses having a thin wire frame and large lenses.

    ‘he has a short grey beard and wears a flannel shirt, jeans, and aviator glasses’
    • ‘With his gold-rimmed aviator glasses, gray hair, trim beard and friendly face, he almost looked like Santa Claus.’
    • ‘He is incognito, with a blond wig, shaggy mustache and large gold-framed aviator glasses.’
    • ‘Aviator shades are still flying high on the fashion scale, so find a pair that suits you best.’
    • ‘If Joe Sixpack on the latest cover of Men's Health can't pull them off, I doubt you and your cheap aviator glasses can.’
    • ‘The other one was Jeffrey, a short pudgy guy with wire framed aviator glasses, bushy eyebrows and a penchant for wearing flip flops even when it was cold out.’
    • ‘Hardy removed his cloak, putting it in a box behind the seat, pulling out a pair of goggles that reminded Sasha of aviator glasses she had seen in old magazines her father once had.’
    • ‘ATP sells products to pilots from its website, including books, videos, aviator glasses and flying accessories.’
    • ‘In the case of a live lineup, this can mean finding six identical pairs of aviator glasses, or six men with a birthmark the shape of Paraguay on their left cheek.’
    • ‘For the fellas, the most important accessory this season appears to be the aviator glasses.’
    • ‘We saw a deeply tanned, muscular young man wearing aviator glasses.’
    • ‘Anthony is wearing aviator sunglasses, a sweat band around his arm, and a hooded tank top vest.’
    • ‘Behind the man who looks like a man who resembles an actor, is a man wearing what is probably the only pair of aviator glasses.’
    • ‘In the picture, Ford is dressed in a white turtleneck and a white velvet jacket with huge lapels, and he is wearing aviator glasses.’
    • ‘Litter, halternecks, flicked hair, aviator glasses, embroidered denim, lip gloss and even hot pants are the latest trademarks of the Seventies to be enjoying a revival of fortune.’
    • ‘A pair of shattered aviator glasses were found at the site of a 1968 helicopter crash in Laos.’
    • ‘I was feeling sexy despite the facial hair and the super-sized aviator glasses.’
    • ‘If you really want to stand out, you can wear a fisherman hat or a glitzy cowboy hat with tinted aviator glasses.’
    • ‘An example of metal frame shades are aviator glasses, which are among Spring's Must-Haves, made popular by Ray-Ban.’
    • ‘The 82-year-old former history professor is an elf-sized fellow with gold-rimmed aviator glasses and a halo of gray hair.’
    • ‘It makes you wish you'd seen the real Bob Crane at the end, with his smoked aviator glasses, sideburns, stratofortress shirt collar and belted leisure suits.’
    1. 2.1A pair of aviator sunglasses.
      ‘I wear aviators, but it's purely because they are practical sunglasses as opposed to being fashion accessories’
      • ‘However, the optimist in me says there's nothing that can happen that can't be remedied with a large hat and cover-all-sins Aviators.’
      • ‘The most stylish sunglasses this season are military chic aviators, but wrap-arounds and 50s style shades are cool too.’
      • ‘For sunglasses, oversized Aviators are essential to block UV rays and look cool.’
      • ‘Get in the shade with the best shields, wraparounds, aviators, and rimless frames, and all eyes will be on you.’
      • ‘Men's styles are trending toward Top Gun -esque aviators and sporty wraparound frames.’
      • ‘Starting from the top and moving down - the hottest sunglasses a girl can wear this year are over-sized, round frames also known as aviators: not only do they protect your eyes from the sun, they also make you look super retro!’
      • ‘For something more subtle and different from the classic plastic frames, there are these Toreadior aviators with swarovski crystals on the side.’
      • ‘Give me a man in a suit and aviators over a shirtless male model with bulging biceps any day!’
      • ‘For sunglasses junkies, for whom no less than half a dozen pairs will do, Ardene's has a good selection of trendy glasses, from pink graded lenses to mirrored aviators, all for less than fifteen dollars.’

Pronunciation:

aviator

/ˈeɪvɪeɪtə/