Definition of auspice in English:

auspice

noun

archaic
  • A divine or prophetic token.

    • ‘Cultural genealogy, more so than ordinary genealogy, depends on a belief in the magical and usually divine auspices of lineage.’
    • ‘The name sounds right for exchanging marriage vows and what better auspices could there be for starting a nuclear family?’
    patronage, aegis, umbrella, protection, guidance, support, backing, guardianship, trusteeship, sponsorship, supervision, influence, control, charge, responsibility, keeping, care
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • under the auspices of

    • archaic With the help, support, or protection of.

      ‘the course is run under the auspices of the Anglican Church’
      • ‘This was usually done under the auspices of local youth committees.’
      • ‘The past year has seen a number of initiatives completed under the auspices of the community council.’
      • ‘Our board of directors agreed, given that this is done under the auspices of the British National Theatre.’
      • ‘The globalisation process in Europe has taken place under the auspices of the European Union.’
      • ‘The congress is being held under the auspices of the President of Bulgaria.’
      • ‘The truth is that the war was undertaken under UN auspices.’
      • ‘The recent Indian fashion shows in Paris have been held under the auspices of the Indian Embassy there.’
      • ‘Two thirds of all monies that come from Europe to Ireland come under the auspices of the Common Agricultural Policy.’
      • ‘But this should only be done under the auspices of the United Nations.’
      • ‘New national standards will also be introduced and they will come under the auspices of a new government-funded trust.’
      • ‘These students come from nine European countries under the auspices of the Erasmus exchange programme.’
      • ‘Many private gardens are open during the summer under the auspices of Scotland's Gardens Scheme.’
      • ‘The brilliant young pianist was in the city to give a solo concert under the auspices of the Russian Cultural Centre.’
      • ‘However, this body is not independent, because it is under the auspices of the Ministry of Transport.’
      • ‘These courts are not separate courts - they are still under the auspices of the Supreme Court.’
      • ‘It was originally set up under the auspices of a Business Enterprise Centre, as a way of promoting the region, as an entity.’
      • ‘This is happening on their watch, under their auspices.’
      • ‘The fact that they have been published under the auspices of the UN, however, lends them additional weight.’
      • ‘A six-month course for 10 nurses will be held at the hospital under the auspices of the University of Essex.’
      • ‘In situ investigations of human rights situations have been carried out under the auspices of all the regional organizations.’
      • ‘Their dispute ended following agreement reached under the auspices of the Labour Relations Commission.’
      patronage, aegis, umbrella, protection, guidance, support, backing, guardianship, trusteeship, sponsorship, supervision, influence, control, charge, responsibility, keeping, care
      View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century (originally denoting the observation of bird flight in divination): from French, or from Latin auspicium, from auspex ‘observer of birds’, from avis ‘bird’ + specere ‘to look’.

Pronunciation

auspice

/ˈɔːspɪs/